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Howard Community CollegeOnline Cataloguehcc catalogue '11-'12
 
General and Academic InformationPrograms of Study
hcc catalogue '11-'12




Course Descrptions

All course descriptions are alphabetized by category, not by course code. Courses with numbers less than 100 are developmental courses which are non-transferable. Courses numbered in the 100s are first-year level college courses. Courses numbered in the 200s are second-year level courses (Networking courses may be numbered higher than 200). Prerequisites are listed for all courses requiring them. No prerequisite is necessary where none is listed. Developmental courses require a minimum grade of “C.” Nursing and Allied Health programs have special admission and progression requirements. 


ACCOUNTING

ACCT-111 Principles of Accounting I
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, the student will have a comprehensive understanding of basic accounting theory, practice covering the accounting cycle, and a knowledge of basic accounting for partnerships. With emphasis on accounting concepts and principles, the student will perform the fundamentals of recording, summarizing and analyzing the transactions of a business. The student will be involved in the preparation and inter­pretation of working papers and financial statements. The fundamentals of accounting for payroll and assets (cash, notes and accounts receivable, inventories, plant and equipment, and intangibles) will be performed by the student. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-112 Principles of Accounting II
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, which is a continuation of ACCT-111, the student will have a knowledge of basic accounting for corporations, for interpretation and modifications of financial statements, for managerial accounting of costs, and for planning and controlling business operations. Prerequisite: ACCT-111. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-114 Managing Finances with QuickBooks
1 Credit

Upon completion of this course, the student will have basic knowledge of setting up company books including: creating chart of accounts, creating vendor, customer and employee lists, managing lists, managing cash receipts and payments, creating purchase orders, setting up inventory, creating sales invoices, creating reports such as: financial statements, budgets, customized reports, and the exporting and printing of reports. Function accounting and computer skills required. (1 hour weekly)

ACCT-179 QuickBooks® for the Professional
3 Credits

This course teaches students to create and edit financial information for both service and merchandising business using the QuickBooks® Pro accounting software package. Students learn to use QuickBooks Pro to establish a company and enter specific data to complete the accounting cycle. An emphasis is placed tracing accounting principles to the QuickBooks® Pro software. Through an extensive experiential learning approach, students create a fictitious company and produce accounting records such as payroll, bank reconciliations, and financial statements. Credit will only be granted for one of the following: ACCT-114 or ACCT-179. Prerequisite: ACCT-111. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-190 Certified Bookkeeper Review Course
3 Credits
This course serves as a final review for students preparing to sit for the certified bookkeeper exam. Using materials produced by the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers (AIPB), this course examines and practices all of the topics found directly on the exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-111. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-201-202 Accounting Work Experience I and II
3 or 4 Credits

See COOP-201–202 Cooperative Education Work Experience I and II.

ACCT-230 Cost Accounting
3 Credits

This course covers fundamentals of cost accounting including terminology; cost-volume-profit analysis; costing systems; operating, financial, and flexible budgets including variances; and other topics such as transfer pricing and performance measurement. This course prepares students for business decisions in cost accounting and for the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-112. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-231 Intermediate Accounting I
3 Credits

In this course, the student will study and review the foundations of accounting theory and preparation of classified financial statements. The concepts of future and present value and the effects of changing prices on financial reporting will be studied. The student will apply current accounting standards to account for cash, short-term investments, receivables, liabilities, income taxes, inventories, and property. The completion of a comprehensive practice set is required. Prerequisite: ACCT-112. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-232 Intermediate Accounting II
3 Credits
In this course, the student will complete an intensive study of accounting for long-term liabilities, long-term investments in equity and debit securities, corporations, revenue recognition, pension costs, leases, accounting changes and error corrections, financial statements including the Statement of Cash Flows, and analysis of financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT-231. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-233 Advanced Accounting
3 Credits
Students will study business combinations including methods of consolidating affiliated firms into a consolidated set of financial statements. How to account for transactions involving different currencies and the use of hedging strategies are studied. Translating a foreign entity’s financial statements from a foreign currency into a domestic currency is covered. U.S. GAAP and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) are discussed and differences highlighted. Interim and Segment reporting are covered. Study includes partnership characteristics, formation, accounting for activities, ownership changes, and liquidation. This course is to prepare students for business decisions in accounting and for the Financial Accounting and Reporting (FAR) section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-232. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-234 Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting
3 Credits

This course covers governmental and not-for-profit accounting and reporting. Study includes governmental accounting concepts, content and format of the comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR), accounting and reporting transactions for governmental and not-for-profit organizations, and budgeting for these entities. This course prepares students for decisions relating to governmental and not-for-profit accounting and the Financial Accounting and Reporting (FAR) section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-232. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-235 Tax Accounting
3 Credits

This course covers current tax laws governing recognition of items of gross income, exclusions, deductions, capital gains and losses, credits, estimated taxes, employment taxes, and the calculation of taxable income for an individual and sole proprietor. This is the first of three tax courses that prepare students for individual and business decisions relating to federal taxation, the IRS Tax Return Preparer Competency Exams, and the Federal Tax Regulation Section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-112. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-236 Tax Accounting II
3 Credits
This course continues Tax Accounting for federal income tax for individuals and business taxpayers. Topics include federal tax research, tax practice and ethics, tax written communication, tax accounting methods and periods, reconciliation of tax and financial methods, tax elections, current tax laws governing alternative minimum tax for individual and corporate taxpayers, and property transactions. This course is the second of three tax courses that prepare students for individual and business decisions relating to federal taxation, the IRS Tax Return Preparer Competency Exams, and the Federal Tax Regulation Section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-235. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-237 Taxation of Corporations, Partnerships, Estates, and Trusts
3 Credits
This course continues Tax Accounting for federal income tax for individuals and business taxpayers. Topics include federal tax research, tax practice and ethics, tax written communication, tax accounting methods and periods, reconciliation of tax and financial methods, tax elections, current tax laws governing alternative minimum tax for individual and corporate taxpayers, and property transactions. This course is the second of three tax courses that prepare students for individual and business decisions relating to federal taxation, the IRS Tax Return Preparer Competency Exams, and the Federal Tax Regulation Section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-235. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-238 Auditing
3 Credits
This course is the study of auditing and other audit engagement services. The audit process is examined including auditor and management responsibilities, audit objectives, evidence accumulation, documentation, planning, analytical procedures, materiality and risk, and effective internal controls. Types of audit reports are studied, including the report on internal control. Organizations with audit standard setting responsibilities are discussed along with regulation and ethical standards that apply to auditors. This course is to prepare students for business decisions relating to auditing and the Auditing section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-231. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-239 Auditing II
3 Credits

This course continues the study of auditing and other audit engagement services. The audit process is reviewed and applied to various business cycles including sales and collection, acquisition and payment, payroll and personnel, inventory and warehousing, capital acquisitions and repayment, and cash balances. Study includes concepts of an auditor’s legal liability to clients, third parties, federal securities laws, and the profession’s response to legal liability. This course is the second of two courses to prepare students for business decisions relating to auditing and the Auditing section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-238. (3 hours weekly)

ACCT-240 Business Environment for the CPA Candidate
2 Credits
This course covers various business topics from the Business Environment and Concepts (BEC) section of the Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Exam. Topics include corporate governance, economic concepts and analysis, financial management, information systems and communications, strategic planning, and operations management. This course prepares students for business decisions and the BEC section of the CPA exam. Prerequisite: ACCT-230. (2 hours weekly)

AGING SERVICES

AGNG-160 The Aging Process: Gerontology
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will focus on the physiological, psychological, and social changes that impact the aging population. In addition, the student will focus on assessment and counseling skills relevant to preserving independence in the aged and meeting the health needs of the aging population. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as SOCI-160.

AGNG-250 The Psychological Aspects of Aging
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview and understanding of the aging processes in adulthood and later life. Students will examine the basic theoretical models, research methods, and current information on the psychology of adulthood and aging and show how these concepts can be applied to understanding and helping older adults. An emphasis is placed on strategies for successful aging. Emphasis will be on the normal aging process as well as psychological issues and pathologies that affect the elderly. (3 hours weekly)

AGNG-290 Aging and Health
3 Credits

This course will examine the biopsychosocial processes and aspects involved with normal aging. An emphasis will be placed on examining the effects of age changes and health deviations on the functional capacity of older persons. The student will also have the opportunity to explore issues related to aging and health including chronic disease, health promotion, health care systems, long-term insurance, and death and dying. (3 hours weekly)


AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

AMSL-101 Elementary American Sign Language I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply American Sign Language skills – handshape, palm orientation, location, movement and non-manual signals – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare the practices, perspectives, and products of Deaf culture to those of hearing culture; to connect ASL to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using ASL outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

AMSL-102 Elementary American Sign Language II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply American Sign Language skills – handshape, palm orientation, location, movement and non-manual signals – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information; to compare the practices, perspectives, and products of Deaf culture to those of hearing culture; to connect  ASL to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of ASL outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

AMSL-201 Intermediate American Sign Language I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply American Sign Language skills – handshape, palm orientation, location, movement and non-manual signals – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of the practices, perspectives, and products of Deaf culture to those of hearing culture; to connect  ASL to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of ASL outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

AMSL-202 Intermediate American Sign Language II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly  advance their ability to apply American Sign Language skills – handshape, palm orientation, location, movement and non-manual signals – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information in complex structures  and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of the practices, perspectives, and products of Deaf culture to those of hearing culture; to connect  ASL to other relevant  disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of ASL outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)


ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH-104 Introduction to Physical Anthropology and Archaeology
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be able to describe the evolution of humankind from early hominids through present day Homo Sapiens. The student will be able to identify and assess the role of archaeology in discovering, preserving and analyzing fossils and artifacts. The student also will be able to identify the physical traits, behaviors and tool technology necessary for diverse populations to evolve into modern forms. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ANTH-105 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

Through this introduction to cultural anthropology, the student will be able to identify the basic concepts anthropologists use in describing the economic, family, political and religious systems of preliterate cultures. Students will use these concepts in analyzing the specific preliterate culture and will apply the anthropological perspective to their own culture. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ANTH-110 Global Archaeology
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences/Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course examines ancient sites and cultures from around the world. As an introductory class, students will evaluate the theories, techniques, methodologies and biases involved in the recovery and interpretation of archaeological data. Case studies will be used to illustrate this discussion, including the European ‘Celts,’ the Greeks, the Romans, the Aztec and Mayan, the Indus, and regional American Indian groups. Emphasis will be given to the identification, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological data, and the value of different perspectives that have been taken on the study of other cultures over time. Students will also be provided with a worldwide perspective on the role and position of archaeology and cultural heritage in the creation and reiteration of national and ethnic identities. ‘CRM’ (cultural resource management) and the legal protection of archaeological sites and remains in the USA will be discussed. Methods and techniques learned will be applied to the examination of a local archaeological site. A visit to the Maryland Archaeological Conservatory Laboratory and/or local historical archives will also be included. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ANTH-120 Comparative World Cultures
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

This course is a study of several non-western European societies. Its emphasis is on the comparison of the various facets of these societies; their history, customs, economics, religions, and values. Students will have the opportunity to do individual research and thereby gain an understanding and appreciation of a major culture other than their own. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ANTH-220 Cultures of the Middle East
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

ANTH-220 is an introduction to the culture and society of the Middle East. Students will study the geography and history of the Middle East and Northern Africa as they apply to the development of various cultures, attitudes, and beliefs. They will compare and contrast various institutions, both governmental and social, among the countries of these regions. Students will also look at the expression of the culture through art, music, food, dress, and literature. This course is taught in English. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ARAB-220.


ARABIC

ARAB-101 Elementary Arabic I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Arabic-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Arabic language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Arabic language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

ARAB-102 Elementary Arabic II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information; to compare Arabic-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Arabic language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Arabic language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

ARAB-201 Intermediate Arabic I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Arabic-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Arabic language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Arabic language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

ARAB-202 Intermediate Arabic II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information in complex structures  and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Arabic-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Arabic language to other relevant  disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Arabic language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

ARAB-203 Advanced Intermediate Arabic I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

Emphasis in this intermediate course will be on acquiring proficiency in comprehension and on speaking Arabic as a second language. The course utilizes previously acquired grammar, vocabulary, writing, and reading skills in communication-based activities, interactive learning techniques, daily listening and speaking assignments to expand students’ conversation abilities and broaden their comprehension knowledge. The students will apply their speaking skills mainly in conversation, group discussions, debates, presentations, and interviews. (4 hours weekly)

ARAB-204 Advanced Intermediate Arabic II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

Emphasis in this intermediate course will be on developing skills in reading and writing Arabic. The course utilizes previously acquired grammar, vocabulary, writing, and reading skills in communication-based activities, interactive learning techniques, daily listening and speaking assignments to expand students’ conversation abilities and broaden their comprehension knowledge. The students will apply their reading and writing skills mainly in writing of formal letters, emails, short essays, and presentations. (4 hours weekly)

ARAB-205 Arabic Through the Media
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this content-based, advanced intermediate course, students will further develop skills in comprehending and speaking Arabic. Learning will be based on current authentic Arabic media, including news from satellite channels, broadcast news, printed pan-Arab newspapers, computer-based materials, public lectures and current events. Grammatical concepts introduced in elementary and intermediate classes will be re-examined with the intention of expanding them for use in conversation. Students will apply their speaking skills in activities such as summarizing, rephrasing, transcribing and presenting. The fundamental goal of this course is to build fluency in all skills while developing an extensive vocabulary through media exposure. (4 hours weekly)

ARAB-220 Cultures of the Middle East
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is an introduction to the culture and society of the Middle East. Students will study the geography and history of the Middle East and Northern Africa as they apply to the development of various cultures, attitudes, and beliefs. They will compare and contrast various institutions, both governmental and social, among the countries of these regions. Students will also look at the expression of the culture through art, music, food, dress, and literature. Taught in English; this course does not fulfill the world languages sequence requirement. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ANTH-220.


ARCHITECTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

ARCM-101 Architectural Materials and Methods I
3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the basic materials and terminology used in construction. Students will become familiar with the types of materials and supplies used in light construction and their assembly into a completed construction project. Topics include site analysis, site design and structural components such as concrete, masonry, steel and wood frame materials. Pre- or corequisite: CADD-100. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ARCM-102 Architectural Materials and Methods II
3 Credits

This course is the second semester of a two semester architectural methods and materials course. Students will continue to learn about the basic materials and terminology used in construction. The course will address the types of materials and systems required for a controlled environment. Topics include plumbing, heating, cooling and electrical systems. Prerequisite: ARCM-101. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ARCM-200 Construction Management
3 Credits

This course will introduce the student to construction project management. The student will gain an understanding of the skills, procedures, methodology and techniques required to manage construction projects. Topics include construction and design roles, company organization, construction contracts, and cash flow management. This course provides a basic introduction to the use of computers in construction management. Prerequisite: ARCM-102. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ARCM-205 Construction Documentation
3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the technical and legal documents that are used in the construction industry. The course includes a review of plans, designs, specifications and construction contracts, and incorporates a detailed examination of the parts of a contract and associated liabilities. An overview of construction law as it relates to construction documentation is included. Prerequisite: ARCM-102. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ARCM-210 Construction Mechanical and Electrical Systems
3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the mechanical and electrical systems utilized in building construction. Topics covered include plumbing and HVAC systems and a basic introduction to heat loss and environmental control. Fire protection systems will be introduced as well as other life safety systems. The components that make up the electrical system will be introduced and the coordination of these components with the other building systems. Green building systems will be introduced. Prerequisite: ARCM-102. Pre- or corequisite: ARCM-200. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ARCM-215 Construction Operations
3 Credits

This course emphasizes the corporate structure and basic principles required to operate and manage a general contracting company. Project management, from the executive perspective, will be emphasized. Topics include an overview of construction law and a review of the bonding and insurance requirements of a construction project. Prerequisite: ARCM-200. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ARCM-220 Construction Cost Estimating
3 Credits

This course introduces the role of cost estimating into the construction process with an emphasis on the basic components of a construction estimate. Competitive versus negotiated process will be introduced as well as an analysis of general conditions and roles of the subcontractors and vendors. Content will include preparing takeoffs for site work, concrete, masonry, and structural steel components and applying labor, material, and equipment unit prices. Other topics covered include coordinating construction documents, risk analysis, and an introduction to computer estimating programs. Prerequisite: ARCM-102; Pre- or corequisite: ARCM-200. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ARCM-225 Construction Scheduling
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the Critical Path Method (CPM) of construction project scheduling. The emphasis is on preconstruction planning, project procurement, construction sequencing, schedule preparation and reporting. Prerequisite: ARCM-200. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)


ART

ARTT-101 Two-Dimensional Basic Design
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Students completing this course will possess a visual knowledge of art and will recognize the use of the individual two-dimensional design elements that make up a work of art. Students will gain a visual ability and an awareness and sensitivity to the observation of the visual world and to works of art. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-102 Three-Dimensional Basic Design
3 Credits

This course explores the unique problems of designing objects that occupy or delineate three-dimensional space. Students experience various media and approaches and learn to resolve construction problems as well as conceptual problems. Materials may include clay, cardboard, foamcore, wood, paper mache, wire, plaster, and found objects. ARTT-101 is not a prerequisite to ARTT-102; however, students with a background in Two-Dimensional Basic Design (ARTT-101) will find the communication of visual ideas easier. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-103 Art Appreciation
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

The overall purpose of this course is to encourage an appreciation of Western Art. This is a highly visual course in which the student will examine and discuss works of art from the prehistoric to the contemporary periods. The student will be looking at and analyzing many images in order to gain an understanding of their form and content. The student will be analyzing the formal structure of various works of art as well as considering them in the context of the historical period and cultural framework in which they were produced. Recommended for non-art majors. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-104 Art History I
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)
This course is an overview of Western Art that will familiarize the student with prehistoric, Mesopatamian, Egyptian, Minoan/Mycenaean, Greco-Roman, and medieval traditions. The student will come to recognize the major styles, monuments, and artists for each period and develop a theory of the relationship of artistic style to the rest of the cultural formulation. Art historical contexts include considerations of gender and other categories of diversity. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-105 Art History II
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Art from the Renaissance through the Baroque, Neoclassical, Romantic, Modern and Post-Modern periods will be studied in this course. The student will come to recognize the major styles, artists and monuments of each period. Culminating in a study of our own time, the course will emphasize the relationship of artistic style to a cultural period. Art historical contexts include considerations of gender and other categories of diversity. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-106 History of Western Architecture I
3 Credits

An examination of the development of Western architectural styles from the ancient world through the late Middle Ages. Parallel developments in the Eastern world will also be considered. Architectural design and city planning are studied as responses to religious, political, economic, and cultural needs, as well as for an understanding of their structural principles. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-107 History of Western Architecture II
3 Credits

An examination of the development of Western architectural styles from the Renaissance through the 20th century and an introduction to contemporary problems in architecture and urbanism. Parallel developments in the Eastern world will also be considered. Architectural design, landscape architecture, and city planning are studied as responses to religious, political, economic, and cultural needs. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-108 Environmental Design: Introduction to the Built Environment
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Students will be introduced to the conceptual, perceptual, behavioral, and technical aspects of architecture and environmental design including methods of analysis, problem solving, and project implementation. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-109 Drawing I
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an introduction to the theories, practices, and techniques of drawing as a descriptive tool and as a mode of personal expression. The emphasis is on perception and the traditional conventions of representational drawing, including perspective, proportion, and composition. Students will work in line to emphasize accurate shapes and values to develop form and the effect of light. Previous drawing is helpful but not necessary. Experienced students will find that this course will improve their ability to handle the fundamental concepts of representational drawing. Subjects may include still life, interiors, portraits, and figures. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-110 Drawing II
3 Credits

This course will review and expand upon the concepts, skills, and subject matter covered in Drawing I. The emphasis is on perception and the traditional conventions of representational drawing, including perspective, proportion, and composition. Students will work in line to emphasize accurate shapes and values to develop form and the effect of light. The use of space and the difference between depiction and suggestion will be emphasized. Previous drawing experience is absolutely necessary. Subjects may include still life, interiors, portraits, and figures. Prerequisite: ARTT-109. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-112 Introduction to Digital Media
3 Credits

This course focuses upon the use of the computer as a creative tool for the visual arts. Working with various painting and drawing programs, such as CorelDraw, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop, students will learn how to create images by drawing and painting directly with the computer and by capturing, altering, and processing images using the many transformation tools available in different software. In addition to exploring the possibilities and limitations of digital media, students will explore the philosophical and ethical issues that electronic image making presents. Prerequisite: ARTT-101. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-120 Three-Dimensional Modeling and Animation
3 Credits

This course is to introduce the student to the concepts of 2D/3D computer animation. The student will develop and apply traditional animation techniques using computer software. The applications of computer animation will include engineering, visualization, advertising, and multimedia. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly) NOTE: Also listed as CADD-120.

ARTT-121 Introduction to Gaming and Simulation Design
3 Credits

This course is designed for students in the gaming and simulation design curriculum, individuals currently working in the gaming industry, and people interested in exploring an up-and-coming technology. This course will expose the student to the fundamentals of gaming and simulation design from concept to forming strategies and development. The course will cover topics such as gaming genres, simulation conventions, design strategies for gaming and simulation, interface design, storytelling, and selling concepts in formal proposals. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-122 History of Modern Art
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course introduces art as a reflection of humanity our diversity and our creative processes. The History of Modern Art will root the cultural achievements of the 20th Century in their historical settings, showing how the political, social, and economic events of the period influenced artistic creation. This course is a survey of the most important movements in Western Art from the late 19th Century to the early 21st Century. The impact of Modernism on painting, sculpture, printmaking, and mixed media will be covered. The student will learn the major artists and the influence that each art movement has on the next generation of artists. This is an important course for those who want to understand contemporary art. It also meets the oral presentation requirement for graduation. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-123 African Art and Architecture
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is a survey of traditional African art and architecture. Students will gain a broad knowledge of African forms and learn the distinct styles of a diverse selection of ethnic groups and countries across the continent, while gaining a general understanding of the meaning and use of art in African societies. The course will also examine the dislocation and presentation of African art in the West from the 19th century to present-day. Theoretical issues will be approached through reading assignments, class discussion, museum visits and guest speakers. There will be in-class presentations. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-130 Introduction to Video I
3 Credits

This course will include the basic skills of video: direction, camera techniques, lighting and sound techniques, and editing techniques. The emphasis will be on producing short video segments using television field production techniques and design principles. (4 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as TVRD-130.

ARTT-131 Introduction to Video II
3 Credits

This course will include the intermediate skills of video: producing, directing, camera techniques, lighting and sound techniques, and editing techniques. The emphasis will be on producing television shows using field and studio production techniques and design principles. Prerequisite: ARTT-130 or TVRD-130. (4 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as TVRD-131.

ARTT-140 Photography Appreciation
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is a study of photography as a fine art form from its beginnings to contemporary times. Early photography, pictorialism, modernism and contemporary works will be discussed. Genre considerations such as portraiture, documentation, landscape, and the nude will be discussed. Various photographers’ works will be studied in some depth. Emphasis will be placed on the meaning, aesthetic qualities and the context of photographs in history and in relation to other art. Parallels will be drawn to painting and sculpture and to more recent photographs. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-141 Basic Photography
3 Credits

This course will focus on developing the skills necessary to identify and produce a good photograph and on acquiring a thorough knowledge of appropriate photographic equipment. In addition, the student will learn the basic elements of design, composition and lighting, as well as, develop an understanding of the technical skills in photography including cameras, films, exposure meters, depth of field, film development and print processing. Students must have access to a fully adjustable 35mm SLR FILM camera. (4 ½ hours weekly)

ARTT-142 Intermediate Photography
3 Credits

This intermediate film photography course will expand on the concepts learned in ARTT-141. Students will apply the skills learned in the basic course while continuing to learn more intermediate concepts in composition, lighting, camera techniques and printing techniques. In addition, the student will begin concentrating on creative self expression. Students must have access to a fully adjustable 35mm SLR FILM camera. Prerequisite: ARTT-141. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ARTT-143 History of Photography
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an examination of the development of photography from its beginnings to the present day. It will include the study of the interrelationships between photography and other visual arts, the effects of changing technologies on the photographic image, and the contributions of major photographers and art movements, as well as historical perspectives. (3 hours weekly)

ARTT-146 Digital Photography I
3 Credits

In this basic digital photography course, students will study digital camera operation exposure challenges, composition, and lighting. Students will learn about photo editing software, image archiving and digital printing. With an emphasis on content as well as craft, students will learn to create images for visual communication and self-expression. A digital camera with manual capabilities is required for the course. Prerequisite: ARTT-101. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-147 Digital Photography II
3 Credits

This intermediate digital photography course, which will work with image files in the raw format, will expand upon the concepts and techniques introduced in ARTT-146. Students will master digital image creation and production in black and white and color. Digital asset management and post production will be emphasized. A digital camera with manual capabilities and raw format ability is required. Prerequisite: ARTT-146. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-148  Digital Imaging, Raster Program I
3 Credits

Using Photoshop, the current industry standard program, students will attain a comprehensive knowledge of digital image creation and production. Using a raster-based graphic image production and editing software program, the student will gain a working knowledge of painting and editing tools, selection techniques, color correction, special effects, scanning, prepress preparation and print options, digital photography techniques and more. With an emphasis on technical skill as well as craft, students will learn to design, retouch, and composite images for effective visual communication and self‑expression. Basic computer literacy is required. Prerequisite: ARTT-112. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-149 Digital Imaging, Raster Program II
3 Credits

This course is an in-depth exploration of the concepts and techniques introduced in ARTT-148. Students will further their mastery of digital image creation with Photoshop. Students will create and design images that take advantage of the unique power of the emerging digital technology medium. Prerequisite: ARTT-148. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-151 Ceramics I
3 Credits

This studio ceramics course incorporates information about clay, clay preparation, glazes and glazing techniques, and kiln technology. The course emphasizes handbuilding techniques and clay as a medium of expression. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-152 Ceramics II
3 Credits

The student will continue to explore handbuilding techniques and clay as an expressive medium. There will also be an opportunity for a limited number of interested students to work on the potter’s wheel. Students in Ceramics II will have more freedom to identify and pursue their own areas of interest. Prerequisite: ARTT-151. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-153 Wheel Throwing I
3 Credits

This studio ceramics course incorporates basic information about clay, wheel throwing for the beginner, glazes and kiln technology. The course emphasis is on centering clay and throwing bowls and cylinder forms such as mugs and vases. Students will also learn and apply the basics involved in finishing their works using a wide palette of classroom glazes. Prerequisite: ARTT-151. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-154 Wheel Throwing II
3 Credits

This studio ceramics course is a continuation of Wheel Throwing I and reviews basic information about clay, wheel throwing, glazes and kiln technology. Starting with basic forms such as cylinders and bowls, this course will focus on the student’s aesthetic and technical development in the creation of larger and more complex wheel-thrown functional pieces. Variations of attachment, such as lids, spouts, handles and footing devices will be covered. Students will conduct clay and glaze-making tests and carry out different firing range experiments. Students will also continue to explore various decoration methods that compliment the new forms. Prerequisite: ARTT-153. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-158 Digital Imaging, Vector Program
3 Credits

Using an industry standard vector-based program, students will focus on the use of the computer as a creative tool for visual communication. Using this vector‑based graphic image production and editing software program, the student will gain a working knowledge of image design, creation and transformation, color selection, special effects, prepress preparation, print options and more. With an emphasis on the commercial application of technical skill and craft, students will learn to design and composite images for effective visual communication and artistic self-expression. In addition to exploring the possibilities and limitations of digital media, students will also explore the legal and ethical issues that digital image creation presents. Basic computer literacy is required. Prerequisite: ARTT-112. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-171-173 Art Gallery Practicum
1 Credit

Students will learn exhibit design, lighting, and promotion while working in a gallery setting. Working with the gallery director, students will help install the exhibits and design the informational materials. Proper handling, exhibit philosophy, press releases, and gallery management will be covered in this course for those interested in arts administration, gallery management, or museum studies. Students may take this course up to three times for credit by registering for the class in numerical sequence starting with ARTT-171. (Minimum 45 hours per semester)

ARTT-200 Graphic Design
3 Credits

Students will acquire practical introductory knowledge of commercial art and advertising design. They will be able to solve formal problems dealing with fundamental principles and will ­develop the basic skills necessary to work with specific types of media, especially computer­generated graphic design. The primary objective of this course is to teach students to prepare advertisements and commercial designs from concept to visual communication. Prerequisite: ARTT-148 or ARTT-158. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-201 Advanced Color Design
3 Credits

This course provides an in-depth analysis and practical application of two dimensional design concepts through independent projects. Students will explore all aspects of color as an element of the design process, as well as learn to develop designs from simple units to more complex modules, exploring theme and variation forms. Students will gain a visual knowledge, awareness and sensitivity to the visual world and to works of art. Prerequisite: ARTT-101. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-202 Introduction to Relief Printmaking
3 Credits

The student will be exposed to the relief printmaking process. The student will prepare, use and care for tools, blocks and plates, cut blocks and plates and print in numbered editions. The student will also study the history of relief printmaking. Prerequisite: ARTT-109. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-204 Digital Publishing
3 Credits

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the process of creating documents that combine typography and graphics from initial design conception through production to final output. The students will learn the proper use of the features and commands in the software currently utilized in the digital printing industry to create and format a variety of documents that are in demand by today’s businesses and publishing companies. Prerequisite: ARTT-148 or ARTT-158. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-208 Environmental Design: Contemporary Issues in Architecture
3 Credits

Students will study green technology in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Planning. They will do scaled working drawings, make models, and create advanced proposals and project designs using computer-aided design. Using the principles of Energy Efficient Building, students will design Green Architecture that focuses on low cost prefabricated homes for the expanding population of America and the world. Prerequisite: ARTT-108. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-211 Painting I
3 Credits

The student will learn the materials, tools, and approaches to painting in oil or acrylic. Color mixing and theory as it applies to painting is a central concern of the course. The emphasis in the course is on technical mastery and direct observation from life. Subjects may include still life, interiors, landscape, portraiture, and figures. Prerequisites: ARTT-101 and ARTT-109. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-212 Painting II
3 Credits

This course is a continuation of ARTT-211, Painting I. Students continue to polish their technical skills, and there is more emphasis on conceptual concerns. Contemporary approaches to representational painting are studied, and students have more latitude for stylistic exploration. Problems will challenge students’ imaginations as well as their technical expertise. Prerequisite: ARTT-211. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-213 Portraiture I
3 Credits

This course will include the basic skills of portrait drawing: proportion, line, form, and the anatomy of the head and neck. The emphasis will be on anatomical knowledge, observation, and the use of traditional design principles. Prerequisite: ARTT-110. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-214 Portraiture II
3 Credits
This course is a continuation of ARTT-213. The student moves on to color work and portrait painting, using the combined knowledge of anatomy, drawing, color theory, and painting techniques. Prerequisites: ARTT‑211 and ARTT-213. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-215 Pastel Drawing
3 Credits

The student will use pastels as a color medium in drawing. Fundamental drawing skills will be combined with color mixing and color design to explore traditional and contemporary approaches to pastel. The variety of subject matter will include still life, interiors, landscape, portrait, and figures. Students will explore the influences of other artists and styles as they develop their own individual expression. Prerequisite: ARTT-110. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-221 Art Museum Field Trips
1 Credit

This course involves student exposure in the form of approximately eight prearranged, organized field trips or tours to the art museums of the Baltimore-Washington area. Museums may include the Walters, Baltimore Museum of Art, National Gallery East and West, Hirshhorn, Freer Gallery of Oriental Art, Corcoran, Renwick and Phillips Collection. Lectures and discussions will be arranged on site at these various museums. Field trips are required. There will be a fee assessed to cover the bus transportation based on the number of students enrolled in the course. Museum connoiseurship includes consideration of gender and other categories of diversity. (8 hours bi-weekly)

ARTT-223 Motion Graphics
3 Credits
This course will include basic skills in motion graphics: color, form, typography, design and movement of design elements. Students will utilize software such as Adobe Photoshop and After Effects to create compositions. Prerequisite: ARTT-112. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-225 Life Drawing I
3 Credits

In this course, students learn the descriptive and expressive drawing of the human body by working from live models and studying human anatomy. Students consider proportions, the skeletal and muscular systems, surface anatomy, foreshortening, drapery, and the expressive use of lighting. Traditional and contemporary approaches to the presentation of the human figure are explored. Prerequisite: ARTT-110. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-226  Life Drawing II
3 Credits

This course is a continuation of ARTT-225, Life Drawing I. The student will continue to work from the live model and develop the perceptual skills necessary to life drawing. Advanced projects related to the study of anatomy and traditional drawing conventions will be required. Drawing II students will analyze the structure and the anatomy of old master drawings. Prerequisite: ARTT-225. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-227 Watercolor Painting I
3 Credits

This course is for students with no watercolor experience. Fundamental techniques like washes, dry-brush, controlled strokes, and wet-into-wet applications will be covered. This course will introduce pigment properties, composition, and color design. There will be an emphasis on the representational conventions of form and space, covered with a variety of subject matter including still life, landscape, interiors, and figures. Prerequisites: ARTT-101 and ARTT-109. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-228 Watercolor Painting II
3 Credits
This course is for students with previous watercolor experience. Fundamental techniques like washes, dry-brush, controlled strokes, and wet-into-wet applications will be reviewed. This course will introduce pigment properties, large-scale composition, advanced color design, and the development of a more personal approach. In addition, there will be more emphasis on the representational conventions of form and space, covered with a variety of subject matter including still life, landscape, interiors, and figures. Prerequisite: ARTT-210 or ARTT-227. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-229 Chinese Brush Painting I
3 Credits

Chinese Brush Painting is a unique art form, reflecting the principles of Chinese aesthetics, specialized materials and techniques. In this course, students will learn the basic principles of Chinese art and their relationship to universal design principles. The subjects for the paintings will be the traditional flora and fauna typical of this art form. The techniques include the use of bamboo brushes; the creation of ink washes in five gradations, the use of Chinese liquid transparent and opaque colors, and working on absorbent rice paper. Overall, students will express themselves in a Chinese form of art, learn a new artistic medium, and see the relationship to western principles and techniques. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-230 Chinese Brush Painting II
3 Credits

This course is the continuation of ARTT-229. In this course, students will continue their study of the fundamental principles of Chinese art. The student will focus on “Six Principles” of Chinese Painting for a more theoretical approach to the course. More comprehensive study on technique in the using brush stroke, ink, color, and variations on absorbent/non-absorbent paper will be the key for students that want to acquire mastery of this art form. The subject matter will be expanded beyond ARTT-229 to include landscape and atmosphere. Prerequisite: ARTT-229. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-231 Sculpture I
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the basic elements, materials, and techniques of sculpture. Approaches may include modeling such as with clay, addition such as assemblage, or subtraction such as carving wood or stone. The student learns how to approach the basic elements of three-dimensional form including scale, mass, color, movement, and use of space in a sculptural manner. Prerequisites: ARTT-101 and ARTT-102. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-232 Sculpture II
3 Credits
This course is a continuation of ARTT-231 with an increased emphasis on conceptual concerns. Students learn about contemporary approaches to sculpture and have more latitude for stylistic exploration. Prerequisite: ARTT-231. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-241 Advanced Black and White Photography
3 Credits

This course will continue to focus on skills developed in Intermediate Photography using the camera as a means of creative self-expression and communication. The student will master the design and composition elements that are an intrinsic aspect of photography, and will learn to work independently in developing his or her photographic sense of sight. Extensive lab work will be required with emphasis on experimental darkroom techniques, and mastery of darkroom skills. Prerequisites: ARTT-141 and ARTT-142. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ARTT-242 Creative Darkroom Techniques
3 Credits

This course will examine and apply the materials and elements of experimental photographic techniques to enhance the student’s artistic self-expression. Extensive lab work will be required with emphasis on experimental darkroom techniques. Prerequisites: ARTT-141 and ARTT-142. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ARTT-246 Photographic Studio Lighting
3 Credits

An introduction to the principles of artificial lighting and camera work as they are applied in studio photography; teaches studio lighting for still lifes, products, portraits, and figure photography. Students must have a 35 mm fully adjustable SLR camera. The use of medium format cameras will be covered. Prerequisite: ARTT-142 or ARTT-147. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ARTT-247 Photojournalism I
3 Credits

This course will focus on taking photographs with a photojournalistic perspective. A portfolio of images will be the end result. Types of photojournalism applications involve news photos, feature photos, sports photos, weather photos, humor photos, environmental portraiture and the photo essay. Fundamental principles of photojournalism such as the history of photojournalism, freedom of the press, ethics in journalism and the power of the image in society will also be addressed. This is NOT a writing intensive course; the emphasis will be on photography. A digital camera and basic computer literacy are required. Prerequisites: ARTT-142 or ARTT-146. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-250 Art Portfolio Assessment
1 Credit

This course is designed to prepare advanced visual arts students for the portfolio review process at transfer institutions. Acceptance and placement into programs of advanced study are most frequently based upon a review of a portfolio of the student’s work. Each student’s portfolio will be reviewed, and strengths, deficiencies, and omissions will be noted. In working sessions during the course of the semester, those deficiencies and omissions will be corrected. Students will learn how to make slides, mat, mount, and otherwise prepare work for the transfer portfolio review. They will review sample portfolios and learn about the transfer review process from admissions officers, alumni, and art instructors. At the end of the class students will have an exit portfolio review where they will have a final assessment of their preparedness for the transfer process. (1.5 hours weekly for 10 weeks)

ARTT-252 Painting III
3 Credits

This course is designed to further challenge the student who has completed Painting II. Each semester there will be a specific focus, such as, Landscape, Still Life, The Portrait, etc. There will be an emphasis on the student finding and developing their own style in responding to each specific focus. Prerequisite: ARTT-212. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-254 Landscape Oil Painting I
3 Credits

Landscape Oil Painting I is a basic introduction to the theories, practices, and techniques of painting outdoors and on-site as a tool for understanding the representation of the form, space, suggestion, and simplification of the natural environment. Prerequisites: ARTT-101 and ARTT-109. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-255 Landscape Oil Painting II
3 Credits

This is a continuation of Landscape Oil Painting I. This course will review the basic theories, practices, and techniques of painting outdoors and will introduce alla prima painting, a variation in surfaces, and the development of a personal approach. Composition and color for expression and personal directions in contemporary painting will also be covered. Prerequisite: ARTT-254. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-260 Designing for Interactive Environments
3 Credits

This course studies interactive design principles through analysis and creation of interface designs for websites, multimedia presentations, DVD menus, and other forms of interactive media. Design applications, architecture, navigation, usability, and content are explored, as well as typography, imagery, and layout techniques. Prerequisite: ARTT-112. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-261 Digital Video
3 Credits

This course will include the skills in acquiring audio and video for new media distribution: direction, camera techniques, lighting and sound techniques, and editing techniques as well as codecs and compression techniques. The emphasis will be on the video production for new media. Prerequisite: CMSY-126 or CMSY-129. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-270 Multimedia Authoring and Design I
3 Credits

This course is an overview and introduction to creating multimedia animations and presentations. Taught from a design perspective, students will use Adobe Flash to draw and animate vector-based art, import and animate raster-based images, and storyboard and implement basic interactivity using ActionScript. Projects will be exported for publication on the web and CD-ROM. Prerequisite: ARTT-112. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-271 Multimedia Authoring and Design II
3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Multimedia Authoring and Design I. The underlying scripting language in Adobe Flash, ActionScript, is emphasized. In addition to vector and raster-based art, students will use sound and video in presentations, games, and animations. Taught from a design perspective, students will employ ActionScript to produce dynamic content, interactive animation, and advanced interaction components, providing a richer, more involved presentation and user experience. Prerequisite: ARTT-270. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-280 Web Design and Production I
3 Credits

This course is an overview and introduction to creating websites. Taught from a design perspective, students will use Adobe Photoshop and Dreamweaver to create detailed sitemaps, design interfaces, produce web graphics, and construct complete websites ready for publishing on the web. Emphasis is on a thorough understanding of HTML and solid, reliable site construction using Adobe Dreamweaver. Prerequisite: ARTT-112. (4 hours weekly)

ARTT-281 Web Design and Production II
3 Credits

This course is a continuation of Web Design and Production I. Taught from a design perspective, students will explore basic multimedia production in Adobe Flash and include multimedia components, as well as advanced behaviors and Javascripts, into websites using Adobe Dreamweaver. Students will also examine CSS layout, template-driven websites and dynamic content using PHP. Prerequisite: ARTT-280. (4 hours weekly)


ASTRONOMY

ASTR-104 Elementary Astronomy
3 Credits (Science Core)
Elementary Astronomy is a one-semester elementary course in descriptive astronomy, especially appropriate for non-science students. The student will become knowledgeable in the areas of historical astronomy, basic tools and methods of astronomy, earth and celestial body motions, characteristics of the sun and its planets, composition and evolution of stars, nature and distribution of galactic systems, role of the space program, and the possibility of life in the universe. For astronomy lab, see ASTR-114. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH-070. (3 hours weekly)

ASTR-114 Elementary Astronomy Lab
1 Credit (Science Core)

In this course the student will acquire elementary observational, measurement, and experimental experiences in astronomy. The student will utilize the metric system to measure given objects, make a simple telescope, plot the moon’s orbit from phase photos, identify spectral lines, use a microcomputer for simulations and CAI, make and record observations of the sunset location and moon’s phases for several weeks, etc. Experiments will be performed to demonstrate scientific concepts used in astronomy. At least one night time observation is required. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH-070; Pre- or co­requisite: ASTR-104. (2 hours lab weekly)


BIOINFORMATICS

BFMT-200 Bioinformatics
3 Credits

Bioinformatics is the science of storing, extracting, organizing, analyzing, interpreting, and utilizing biological information. This course provides an introduction to bioinformatics, the combined field of biology and informatics (information science and technology). This course integrates biological concepts with computer and database methods to study biological systems. The Associate of Arts Informatics Degree program prepares students for undergraduate schools or a career in the fast-paced pharmaceutical or biotechnology industries. Prerequisite: BIOL-101. (4 hours weekly)

BFMT-204 Intermediate Bioinformatics
3 Credits
Course integrates biological concepts with computer and database methods to study biological systems. Concepts covered include modeling complex biological systems, mechanisms and integration of molecular and organism evolution, introduction to web-based biological databases, and computational tools for analysis of genomic and protein data. The Associate of Arts Bioinformatics Degree program prepares students for undergraduate schools or a career in the fast-paced pharmaceutical or biotechnology industries. Prerequisite: BFMT-200. (4 hours weekly)


BIOLOGY

BIOL-101 General Biology I
4 Credits (Science Core)

Following successful completion of Biology 101, the student will be able to describe the characteristics of living things at all levels of organization-from the atomic through the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. The study of human genetics, development, and anatomy and physiology will enable the student to relate the chemical activities of the cell to the overall function of man. Prerequisite: ENGL-096 or ENGL-086. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-102 General Biology II
4 Credits (Science Core)

This course will enable the student to understand and recognize the evolutionary and environmental relationships that exist between all organisms. The student will be exposed to and will work with representative organisms of all five kingdoms to establish the concept of interrelatedness of all living organisms. Topics such as animal behavior and ecology will be utilized to develop this concept. Prerequisite: BIOL-101. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-103 Human Heredity
3 Credits (Science Core)

Human Heredity is an introductory life science course designed for students who are not majoring in the life sciences. Topics in the course include the basic principles of inheritance, a survey of human hereditary characteristics and disorders, and genetic technology and gene manipulation. Current scientific and bioethical questions regarding the present and future applications of genetic analysis and genetic engineering will be considered. (3 hours weekly)

BIOL-104 Oceanography
3 Credits (Science Core)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the four major disciplines in ocean sciences: biological, chemical, geological and physical oceanography. These areas are studied by describing the composition of the oceans and then by examining the major processes which are active there, such as plate tectonics, ocean circulation, wave and tidal action and food webs. In addition, the course will cover man’s use of the ocean as a natural resource and as a waste disposal site. (3 hours weekly)

BIOL-105 Environmental Science
3 Credits (Science Core)
Following the successful completion of Biology 105, the student will be able to describe the energy, chemistry and climate that make up the earth and its atmosphere. The student will be able to differentiate among the various biomes on earth and recognize the diversity of organisms living in these ecosystems. The study of pollution, natural resources, conservation, and the impact man has had on his environment will enable the student to relate environmental science to how our world works, and what we can do to protect it. Prerequisite: ENGL-096 or ENGL-086. (3 hours weekly)

BIOL-106 Basic Anatomy and Physiology
4 Credits

This course is designed for students who need one semester of science which provides a learning sequence of the human body systems, fluid-electrolyte balance and tissues. The integrated approach to studying biological, chemical and physics relationships is stressed. Special emphasis, however, is given to the physics concepts applicable to human physiology. The laboratory program will develop an understanding of the interrelationships of the human body systems. Prerequisite: PHYS-101 or BIOL-101 or BIOL-107 (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-107 Fundamentals of Microbiology
4 Credits (Science Core)

Fundamentals of Microbiology is a course designed with a strong emphasis towards the allied health careers. Following the successful completion of Biology 107, the student will be able to describe the characteristics of living things from the molecular to the cellular level for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The study of microbiology will enable the student to understand the biology of bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses in terms of morphology, classification, reproduction, metabolism, genetics, population growth, and disease production. In the laboratory, the student will gain experience with the tools and techniques used in the study of microorganisms. Prerequisite: ENGL-096 or ENGL-086. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-108 Human Anatomy and Physiology
6 Credits

BIOL-108 is a one-semester course designed for students who wish to undertake an in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of human body systems. Topics in the course include basic chemistry, cell structure and function, histology, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, endocrine system, cardiovascular system, immunity, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, fluids and elecrolytes and reproductive system. Students will examine each body system on a microscopic and a gross level. (6 hours weekly)

BIOL-115 Environmental Science Laboratory
1 Credit (Science Core)

In BIOL-115, students will investigate the interactions among populations and their environment using field techniques for analyzing water quality, soil formation and erosion, stream ecology, species diversity, intra and interspecific competition, and estimation of population size. Students will experience first hand environmental management problems on field trips to a waste water management site. a solid waste management site, and a recycling site. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL-105. (3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-200 Microbiology
4 Credits (Science Core)

Biology 200 is a course designed primarily for pre-medical professionals and for students planning to major in biological sciences in a four-year institution. The study of microbiology will enable the student to understand the biology of bacteria, algae, fungi, protozoa and viruses in terms of morphology, classification, reproduction, metabolism, genetics, population growth, environmental effects on growth and disease production. In addition, the student will study basic principles of water pollution, and inhibition and killing of microorganisms. In the laboratory, the student will gain experience with the tools and techniques used in the study of microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIOL-101 and 4 credits of chemistry. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-201 Genetics
3 Credits (Science Core)

Following successful completion of Biology 201, the student will be able to describe the principles of inheritance in terms of the structure and function of genetic material in viruses, bacteria, and higher organisms; the transmission and expression of genetic information; sex determination and sex chromosomes; extrachromosomal inheritance; gene mutation; recombination and regulation; genetic control of metabolism, development and behavior; and recombinant DNA techniques. The student will also utilize the principles of inheritance to solve real and simulated problems in human genetic counseling and in plant and animal breeding. For genetics lab, see BIOL-202. Prerequisite: BIOL-101 and MATH-070. (3 hours lecture weekly)

BIOL-202 Genetics Lab
1 Credit (Science Core)

In BIOL-202, students will investigate the basic principles of genetics using various organisms, including Drosophila, bacteria, fungi, viruses, green plants and human cells. Students will utilize various laboratory techniques including microscopy, photomicroscopy, slide preparation, micro-dissection, paper chromatography, gel electrophoresis, bacterial culture and statistical analysis. Computer simulations will also be utilized. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL-201. (3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-203 Anatomy and Physiology I
4 Credits (Science Core)

Biology 203 is a course consisting of an integrated sequence of physical, chemical and biological principles relating to living systems. This course is designed for students whose curriculum requires a sequential two-semester science learning program (BIOL-203 and BIOL-204) which provides an in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body systems. The body topics studied in Biology 203 include histology, the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system, endocrine system and special senses. The laboratory program will develop an understanding of the interrelationships of the human body systems. The laboratory includes animal and organ dissections as well as work with skeletons, models, slides and experimental studies of physiological processes. Prerequisite: BIOL-101 or BIOL-107. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-204 Anatomy and Physiology II
4 Credits (Science Core)

This course is a continuation of BIOL-203 and consists of an integrated sequence of physical, chemical and biological principles relating to the circulatory system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, fluid-electrolyte balance, and reproductive system. This course will enable the student to describe the mechanisms of the human body in terms of the structures and functions of the systems studied. The laboratory program will develop an understanding of the interrelationships of the human body systems. The laboratory includes animal and organ dissections as well as work with skeletons, models, slides and experimental studies of physiological processes. Prerequisite: BIOL-203. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-205 Cell Biology
4 Credits (Science Core)

This is a one-semester course designed for biology majors, biochemistry majors, laboratory science majors, and pre-professional and pre-allied health science students. The course will provide the student with an understanding of biological processes at the cellular and molecular level. Experimental approaches used in cell biology will be emphasized. Topics will include the structure and function of biological membranes, cytoskeletal elements, cell metabolism and energy transformation, cell growth and replication, second messenger systems, signal transduction, electrical properties, cell contact and adhesion and intercellular communication. An emphasis will be placed on eukaryotic cells. The laboratory component will reinforce these topics and introduce the student to techniques used in modern cell biology. Prerequisite: BIOL-201 and CHEM-101. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BIOL-206 Nutrition for Health Services
3 Credits

This course, designed mainly for Science and Pre-Allied Health majors, will enable the student to examine the basic principles of normal nutrition. The student will answer questions and solve problems involving physical and biochemical aspects of digestion, absorption and metabolic functions of the nutrients in the body; caloric requirements; dietary standards; nutrient composition of foods and selection of an adequate diet; and changing nutrient requirements during the different stages of development. In addition, the student will study the influence of social and economic factors on food choices. Prerequisite: BIOL-204. (3 hours weekly)

BIOL-290H Biology Research - Honors
3 Credits

Biology Research is an honors course which provides students with an opportunity to engage in biological research. With the guidance of a faculty member, students select a research topic, carry out a literature search, design and execute appropriate research, write a scientific paper, and deliver a formal oral presentation to the class and science faculty. There is an emphasis on oral communication throughout the semester including weekly oral progress reports followed by class discussion and feedback as well as the final oral presentations. Prerequisite: A or B in BIOL-101, ENGL-121 or ENGL-101, and consent of instructor. (3 hours weekly)


BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

BMET-112 Electro-Mechanical-Fluidic Devices I
3 Credits

The student, upon successful completion of this course, will be able to utilize the basic concepts to investigate the physics of and the interrelation between electrical, mechanical, fluidic and optical systems. The student will know the basic components of each system, where in the overall system they occur and what their function is toward the correct operation of the system. Prerequisite: ELEC-107 and PHYS-101. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BMET-211 Biomedical Instrumentation I
5 Credits

The student will be able to classify biomedical instruments into areas such as support, laboratory, diagnostic, patient monitoring, therapeutic, x-ray, etc. Biomedical transducers will be introduced and students will make application of the terms of sensitivity, resolution, recordability, readability, linearity and accuracy in order to effect correct usage. Prerequisite: BMET-112, BIOL-106 and ELEC-117. Corequisite: ELEC-213. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

BMET-212 Biomedical Instrumentation II
5 Credits

In this theoretical-practical course, the student will utilize electronic and mechanical principles for maintenance and repair of biomedical equipment (electro-mechanical, clinical lab, ultrasonics, patient monitoring, x-ray and radiation). Students will be in a simulated clinical setting where they will perform on-site repairs and preventative maintenance. Prerequisite: BMET-211. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)


BUSINESS

BMGT-100 Introduction to Business and Organization
3 Credits

In this course, students will explore all of the primary disciplines in business on an introductory level:  economics, human resource management, finance options, managerial accounting principles and marketing strategies.   Students will examine challenges present in the current business environment and consider them with an eye toward ethics, social responsibility and effective management strategies in a global economy.  The course is kept current by students’ exposure to guest speakers and case analyses.  Some written and oral reports will be required from these activities.  This course is ideal both for students who wish to pursue a career in business and those who wish to gain a better understanding of the business world in which they live.  (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-113 Technical Issues for the Non-Technical Manager
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide a theoretical and practical basis for the non‑technical manager to deal successfully with technical issues inherent in the operation of a small to medium sized business office or professional services practice. Investigation and discussion of pertinent technical issues will provide a framework within which the manager can implement and manage the organization’s computer systems. Six months experience in a business setting using computers is suggested. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-114 Website Management for the Non-Technical Manager
1 Credit

This course is designed to help managers develop plans for business websites. Students will be able to identify the various uses and benefits of websites and learn how to optimize the website resources. Procedures for dealing with web designers, web developers and other IT staff will be covered. The student will learn about search engine optimization including the use of page descriptions and metatag keywords. (1 hour weekly)

BMGT-120 Small Business Management
3 Credits

Small business management blends entrepreneurial goals with a realistic survey of the wide variety of functional business skills needed to operate a small firm effectively. The course will focus on skills such as marketing, financial management, and business planning, as well as a clearer view of small business’s contribution to the national economy. Students will improve their problem-solving abilities through experiential exercises, classroom discussion, and the completion of a partial business plan. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-130 Principles of Marketing
3 Credits

Students will learn the introductory principles of marketing--research, segmentation, targeting, product/service attributes, pricing, distribution and promotion. Strategies will be explored to create an effective marketing plan for an organization. The course is kept current by students’ exposure to guest speakers and case analyses. Some written and oral reports will be required from these activities. Prerequisite: BMGT-100. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-133 Coaching for Performance in the Workplace
3 Credits

In this course the student will learn and understand the basic theory and principles of coaching for performance improvement. This theory will include the history of coaching, the practicing coach in today’s workplace, and the application of psychology in business coaching. In addition, the student will begin to develop some of the skills required to coach individuals in organizations for performance improvement. After successful completion of this course, the student will have worked on co-creating a coaching relationship and communicating effectively. This course will include case studies, role-playing and journaling. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-134 Coaching as a Tool for Effective Leadership
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

In this course the student will learn how coaching as a philosophy and a set of behaviors is impacting organizations and their leaders today. Students will be able to apply coaching behaviors to all types of leadership situations. Students will explore and analyze the relationship between leader/coach and employee/team member. Learning tools will include case studies, journaling, experiential learning and role play. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-135 Development of an Organizational Coaching Culture
3 Credits

Coaching creates a performance focused, feedback enriched organization capable of creating and sustaining a competitive advantage. This is the business case for coaching. This course introduces the student to the principles of cultural change that lay the foundation around which a coaching culture is initiated. The student will learn what a coaching culture looks like in an organization and how to apply transformational coaching throughout an organization for the purpose of creating high performance in individuals, teams and the organization as a whole. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-136 Coaching Through Change and Transition
3 Credits

In this course the student will learn how coaching functions as a powerful tool to move individuals and organizations through transition. The student will learn how the cultural changes, demanded in the business world today, drive the implementation of a coaching model. The student will be able to apply the coaching principles that underpin an organizational culture that is flexible, resilient and adaptable to change. The student will practice coaching techniques that move individuals successfully through life transitions. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-141 Supervisory Development
3 Credits
Through this course, students will develop skills for successful supervision in business, industry and government. This course emphasizes the understanding and demonstration of basic supervisory concepts as they relate to motivating individuals, maintaining group morale, building loyalty, and interpretation of attitude and supervisory/employee relations. Also, fundamental skill development will include activities in leadership, goal setting, decision making, individual and group communication, performance appraisal, time management, and assertiveness training. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-142 Business Development and Sales for Emerging Leaders
3 Credits (Humanities/Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course introduces the student to the basic skills used in business development and professional selling. Topics covered include how to prospect for potential clients, build effective relationships, assess an individual’s needs, present specific solutions and negotiate agreements. Given the growing need for global competency among business professionals, this course will also look at cultural context and the implications for negotiating agreements. This is appropriate for those interested in learning more about the profession of selling or for those who want to improve their ability to persuade others. Instruction is highly interactive with extensive use of oral and written communication and role play. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as SPCH-142.

BMGT-145 Principles of Management
3 Credits

This class focuses on the knowledge needed by today’s business managers as they make decisions in the current frequently changing, global workplace. Students will obtain skills in such areas as: leadership, domestic and global business culture, strategy and decision-making, the four basic management functions, and information and operations systems management. The course will provide several opportunities to apply knowledge in individual and small group assignments and activities. This course will introduce the concepts of project management and the importance of strategic vision. Prerequisite: BMGT-100. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-150/BMGT-150H International Business Issues Seminar
1 Credit (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course provides a more in-depth exploration of current issues in business across all disciplines. The course will frame backbone disciplines--economics, finance, human resource management and marketing--around the issues of globalization and social responsibility. The primary methodology will be to analyze a business that will be expanding into global markets, evaluating the options of exporting, licensing, contract manufacturing, and direct investment. Students will do an environmental scan and focus on analyzing the demand in the marketplace, financing options, people management and marketing opportunities.

BMGT-151 Business Law I
3 Credits

This introductory course provides students with an opportunity to study law and its impact on business. Students will learn basic legal concepts and their application, build a vocabulary unique to business and the law and develop critical thinking skills that are essential to analyzing cases and making sound business decisions. The course will provide students with an opportunity to study current legal and ethical issues affecting business, contracts, sales, and the American legal system. The knowledge and skills gained from Business Law I are useful for careers in business, human resources, management, alternative dispute resolution, public policy, sales and entrepreneurship. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-152 Business Law II
3 Credits
This course provides students with an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of the study of law and its impact on business. Students will continue to build upon their analytical, writing and vocabulary skills as they relate to business and the law. Instruction will focus on case studies dealing with agency and employment law, real and personal property, bailments, wills and estates, negotiable instruments, and the three major forms of business organization – sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation. The knowledge and skills are valuable for students interested in pursuing a career in business, human resources, management, alternative dispute resolution, sales, entrepreneurship, law, real estate, and banking. Prerequisite: BMGT-151. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-175 Business Communications
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

Communication skills are vital to the success of any employable person in today’s competitive organizational environment. Those able to communicate an idea through interpersonal communication, technology, and writing will be better prepared to conduct themselves properly in an organizational setting. This course encompasses four primary facets of business communication applicable to any employment setting: business writing, interpersonal business communication, business etiquette and professionalism, and business communications utilizing technology. Students will learn how to function cohesively and communicate as a team by delivery of a persuasive group presentation. Finally, course members will learn how companies leverage technology, vital to our global economy, such as web applications, social media, and other tools to better communicate internally as well as with customers. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as SPCH-175.

BMGT-178 Business Writing
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to select examples of writing that have the qualities of effective written business communications. The student will be able to develop effective workplace writing strategies. (1 hour weekly)

BMGT-200 Managing for the Future
3 Credits

This course addresses a growing interest on the part of those in business management to develop a more effective workplace, where new communication methods, a global perspective, and evolving leadership skills will be needed. Focus will be on development and implementation of knowledge, skills, and thought processes that contribute to effective and efficient management in future-oriented businesses. Thriving in a changing environment will be related to employer-employee relations, productive business operations and customer solution delivery. Threaded throughout the course will be an exploration of technological innovations that make success in this environment possible. Prerequisite: BMGT-100. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-201-202 Business Work Experience I and II
3 or 4 Credits
See COOP-201-202 Cooperative Education Work Experience I and II.

BMGT-203 Business Ethics
3 Credits

This course will study the status and elements of ethics within the modern business world and environment. The impact of governing bodies, the role of industry-imposed guidelines, the element of corporate social responsibility, and accepted standards of conduct will comprise some of the elements of this course. Students will learn to examine instances of ethical dilemma, select elements that influence ethical considerations, and determine appropriate ethical decision-making processes. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-204 Taking Your Business Mobile
3 Credits

In this course the student will learn how to improve personal and business productivity using mobile computing devices. The student will analyze the similarities and differences between mobile devices, servers, applications and how mobile technology can improve business. “Smart phone” models will be discussed, and students will learn skills and strategies using them. Students will use mobile phones in class assignments. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-205 Principles of International Business
3 Credits

This course is designed to infuse international cultural awareness and then expand that awareness to multiple international business cultures that are active in the current global marketplace. The course will focus on knowledge and skills pertaining to a wide variety of business operations needed for success in today’s international arena. Prerequisite: BMGT-100. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-229 White Collar Crimes, Fraud and Abuse
3 Credits

This class presents basic knowledge and skills regarding financial, behavioral and control factors affecting the environment for fraud in profit and non profit organizations. Through case studies of widely used fraud schemes, students will analyze processes, evidence, transactions and financial records to identify the risks and red flag indicators associated with fraud and abuse in commerce and nonprofit operations committed by trusted insiders and external parties. The class will focus on the nature of internal controls and the application of analysis tools as practical management techniques for preventing and detecting fraud and abuse. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-230 Principles of Advertising
3 Credits
Students in this course will apply the principles of advertising. Given current business situations, students will be able to create an effective marketing campaign as conducted by company-operated advertising departments as well as advertising agencies. Students will be able to evaluate the appropriateness of on and off line marketing strategies, which include print, multi-media, and Internet marketing initiatives. Included in this course will be such subjects as target marketing, media strategy, ad construction, and laws affecting advertisers. Prerequisite: BMGT-100. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-234 Principles and Practices of Life Coaching
3 Credits

In this course the student will be introduced to the history and evolution of life coaching. The student will analyze the similarities and differences between the life coaching and the business coaching models. The basic life-coaching model will be discussed and skills and strategies that are a part of the model will be presented and practiced. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-235 Co-Active Coaching
3 Credits

In this course the student will learn the principles and components of co-active coaching. The student will learn to apply the unique practices and techniques of co-active coaching to a wide spectrum of clients including corporate executives, small business owners, artists and entrepreneurs. Learning tools will include skill-building exercises, case studies, journaling and role-play. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-236 Establishing a Consulting/Coaching Practice
3 Credits
In this course the student will learn all of the aspects of starting and operating a coaching business. Students will be introduced to marketing strategy and learn how to create a business plan for a start-up coaching practice. Learning tools will include sample business and marketing plans, case studies and the use of worksheets for setting rates and managing revenue. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-240 Human Resource Management
3 Credits

This course focuses on the practical and theoretical concepts relating to the management of people, concentrating on the human element in businesses today. Students will learn aspects of staffing (hiring process), performance appraisals, supervision, and analyses of key legislation affecting the management of personnel. Students will deal with six highly interdependent areas: Human Resource Development, Employee Relations/Motivation, Legal Compliance, Compensation and Benefits, Safety and Health, and Employee Labor Relations. Prerequisite: BMGT 100. (3 hours weekly)

BMGT-241 Project Management
3 Credits

This course is designed to increase the knowledge and skills of students who managing or who are working towards managing projects in a way that will be coherent, thoughtful, timely, and in alignment with an organization’s objectives. It will teach a wide array of principles and components that include project initiation, planning, executing, performance, monitoring and controlling, cost management, and terminology, among others. It will also provide practical knowledge on managing the project scope, schedule, and resources. Concepts are applied through team projects and tutorials using project management software. Additionally, this course will fulfill the training requirement for the PMI Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM®) certification for those who elect to become certified. (3 hours weekly)


CARDIOVASCULAR TECHNOLOGY

CARD-120 Rhythm Analysis and 12 Lead ECG
2 Credits

The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to recognize and interpret the various features of the electrocardiogram (ECG). Emphasis is placed on ECG patterns and components, cardiac conduction and regulation, normal values of ECG components, SA nodal, AV nodal and ventricular arrhythmias, and disorders of the cardiac conduction system. Practical application of ECG theory incorporated with arrhythmia detection will prepare the student to recognize abnormal conduction patterns of clients in various clinical settings. Content will also review normal cardiac anatomy, waveform nomenclature, electrode placement, vectors, and Einthoven’s triangle. Stress Testing and Holter Monitoring will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cardiovascular Technology program and BIOL-204. (2 hours weekly)

CARD-121 Cardiovascular Assessment Skills Lab
3 Credits

The goal of this course is to prepare the student with the assessment and documentation skills needed to evaluate the cardiovascular patient. The student will also become familiar with basic abbreviations used in assessing patients, and the guidelines for patient safety and privacy according to the HIPAA guidelines. Students will have the opportunity to practice their skills to perform a basic history and physical examination of their patients. The class is divided into three components, lecture, lab skills, and clinical. Prerequisite: Admission to the Cardiovascular Technology program and BIOL-204. (3 hours weekly)

CARD-122 Cardiac Anatomy and Pathophysiology
3 Credits
This course is designed for students enrolled in the Cardiovascular Technology program. It will provide an in-depth study of cardiovascular anatomy and pathophysiology, to include circulatory dynamics, cardiac output and control mechanisms. Also included will be pathophysiological mechanisms of embryology, congenital and acquired cardiovascular diseases. The information gained through this course serves as the foundation upon which subsequent cardiovascular topics and themes will be built. Prerequisites: Admission to the Cardiovascular Technology program and BIOL-204. (3 hours weekly)

CARD-123 Hemodynamics
3 Credits

This course encompasses the physical principles and mathematical equations specifically applicable to the field of cardiovascular technology. The course includes studies in using mathematic formulas, chemistry, and physics to evaluate the hemodynamics of the cardiovascular system. Prerequisites: BIOL-203, BIOL-204, PHYS-101 or equivalent and appropriate score on Mathematics Placement exam or eligible to enroll in MATH-070, CARD-121 and CARD-122. (6 hours weekly)

CARD-124 X-Ray Theory for Cardiovascular Technology
3 Credits

This course is designed for students enrolled in the Cardiovascular Technology program. It will provide an in-depth study of x-ray theory to include x-ray imaging, basic sciences, electromagnetic radiation, radiobiological effects, and dose limits for radiation workers. Prerequisite: Admission to Cardiovascular Technology program, Permission of CVT Program Director, PHYS-101 or equivalent and appropriate score on Mathematics Placement Exam or eligible to enroll in MATH-070. (6 hours weekly)

CARD-201 Cardiovascular Pharmacology
2 Credits

This course is designed to prepare the cardiovascular student to choose, handle and administer the numerous cardiovascular and related drugs utilized in invasive and noninvasive cardiology. The general principles of pharmacology such as pharmacokinetics, dose calculations, routes of administration, substrates, side effects and adverse effects will be emphasized. Prerequisite: CARD-122. (2 hours weekly)

CARD-220 Cardiovascular Procedures
2 Credits

The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to enter the Invasive Cardiovascular Laboratory. The student will learn the concepts of the general diagnostic, therapeutic and interventional procedures performed in the modern adult invasive cardiovascular laboratory. Prerequisites: CARD-123 and CARD-124. (2 hours weekly)

CARD-221 Diagnostic and Interventional Procedures
8 Credits

This course will prepare students for the clinical environment. Clinical experience is provided in the invasive setting of the cardiology department. Students will initially observe invasive procedures and eventually participate as they demonstrate competency in the skills laboratory portion of the course. The laboratory portion of the course will prepare the student for the scrub position. Prerequisites: CARD-123 and CARD-124. (16 hours clinical, 8 hours lab weekly)

CARD-222 Advanced Intravascular Interventional Procedures
4 Credits

The student will observe and in some cases assist the physician in performing intravascular interventional radiological procedures. Theory support will include an in-depth review of the anatomy and physiology of the circulatory, neurologic, respiratory, genitourinary, hepatobiliary, lymphatic, and gastrointestinal systems. Prerequisite: CARD-231. Corequisite: CARD-261. (2 hours lecture, 8 hours clinical weekly for 12 weeks)

CARD-231 Applied Clinical Practicum
3 Credits

Clinical experience in procedures performed in invasive cardiology. This includes using the equipment, performing tests, and giving patient care as it relates to the cardiovascular area. Prerequisites: CARD-220 and CARD-221. (32 hours clinical weekly)

CARD-261 Clinical Internship
4 Credits

Practicum in a clinical setting. Student will refine ­clinical skills by active participation in a cardiovascular department. Opportunity will also be provided for observation in alternative sites for technologists in the field. On campus seminar session includes opportunity for case study presentations relative to the field of ­invasive ­cardiovascular technology. Prerequisite: CARD-231. Corequisite: CARD-222. (32 hours lab weekly)

CHEMISTRY

CHEM-101 General Inorganic Chemistry I
4 Credits (Science Core)

Designed mainly for science majors and pre-professional students, this course will enable the student to solve problems and answer questions involving mole concept, gas laws and kinetic theory, stoichiometry and chemical equations, solutions, and atomic structure and electronic arrangement. Independent lab experiments will provide students with data they can appraise, use, and interpret to identify properties and/or unknown chemical substances. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH-070. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CHEM-102 General Inorganic Chemistry II
4 Credits (Science Core)

This course, designed mainly for science majors and pre-professional students, will enable students to solve problems involving chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, ionic and heterogeneous equilibria in aqueous solutions, electrochemistry, and reaction rates. Independent lab experiments will provide students with data that they can appraise, use, and interpret to identify unknowns in qualitative and quantitative analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM-101. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CHEM-103 Fundamentals of General Chemistry
4 Credits (Science Core)
This one semester course is designed mainly for students who are interested in the allied health field. This course will provide the student with an introduction to inorganic chemistry and general chemical principles. The student will be able to answer questions and solve problems involving measurement, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, solutions, kinetics, equilibrium and nuclear reactions. Laboratory experiments will provide the student with opportunities to collect and analyze data and identify unknown chemical substances from their properties. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH-070. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CHEM-104 Fundamentals of Organic and Biochemistry
4 Credits

This one-semester course is designed mainly for pre-professional science students who are interested in the allied health field. This course will provide the student with an introduction to organic and biochemistry. The student will be able to answer questions and solve problems involving nomenclature, physical properties, and the synthesis of aliphatic compounds such as alkanes, alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes and ketones. The major organic biomolecules such as lipids, proteins and carbohydrates, including their function in cells and tissues, will be studied. The laboratory component will develop skills necessary to synthesize and analyze organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM-101 or CHEM-103. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CHEM-105 Chemistry and Society
3 Credits (Science Core)

After successful completion of this course, the student will have an understanding of basic chemical concepts and knowledge of the benefits of chemical technology to the consumer. The student will also understand the complexity of the major environmental problems plaguing our nation and the planet. Corequisite: CHEM-115. (3 hours weekly)

CHEM-115 Chemistry and Society Lab
1 Credit (Science Core)

After successful completion of this laboratory, students will have an understanding of the metric system, basic laboratory measurements and instruments. Students will investigate methods of recycling, separation, synthesis and chemical analysis using samples of common household substances. Students will analyze labels and claims from a consumer’s point of view. Pre- or corequisite: CHEM-105. (3 hours lab weekly)

CHEM-135 Chemistry for Engineers
3 Credits (Science Core)

Designed mainly for engineering students intending to transfer to the University of Maryland, College Park, this course will enable the student to solve problems and answer questions involving atomic structure, electron arrangement, the mole concept, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, solutions, gas laws and kinetic theory, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, and reaction rates. Prerequisite: MATH-143. (3 hours weekly)

CHEM-201 Organic Chemistry I
4 Credits (Science Core)

Chemistry 201, a course designed mainly for science majors and pre-professional students, will enable the student to answer questions and solve problems involving nomenclature, physical properties and synthesis of aliphatic compounds, such as alkanes, alcohols, carboxylic acids, aldehydes and ketones. In the lab program, the student will acquire skills in laboratory techniques, prepare organic compounds, study their properties, and interpret data collected to identify unknowns. Prerequisite: CHEM-101. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CHEM-202 Organic Chemistry II
4 Credits (Science Core)

A course designed mainly for science majors and pre-professional students, Chemistry 202 will enable the student to answer questions and solve problems involving aromatic compounds and their derivatives, carbohydrates, amino acids, and fats. In the lab program, the student will acquire skills in laboratory techniques, prepare organic compounds, study their properties, and interpret data collected to identify unknowns. Prerequisite: CHEM-201. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CHEM-290H Chemistry Research - Honors
3 Credits

Chemistry Research is an honors course which provides students with an opportunity to engage in chemical research. The goal of this course is to develop chemical research skills. The instructor will be working closely with students as they choose, develop, and carry out a research project. Students will learn how to use state-of-the-art research equipment that can be applied to their own research project. The instructor will provide assistance with the learning of laboratory techniques, statistical methods, library research, computer-assisted data analysis, and research paper writing. Prerequisite: A or B in CHEM-101 and consent of instructor. (3 hours weekly)


CHINESE

CHNS-101 Elementary Mandarin Chinese I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)
In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Mandarin Chinese-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Mandarin Chinese language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Mandarin Chinese language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

CHNS-102 Elementary Mandarin Chinese II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Mandarin Chinese-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Mandarin Chinese language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Mandarin Chinese language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

CHNS-201 Intermediate Mandarin Chinese I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)
In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Mandarin Chinese-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Mandarin Chinese language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Mandarin Chinese language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

CHNS-202 Intermediate Mandarin Chinese II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)
In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly  advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information in complex structures  and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Mandarin Chinese-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Mandarin Chinese language to other relevant disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Mandarin Chinese language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)


CISCO

CSCO-281 Network Fundamentals
3 Credits
The focus of this course is on learning the fundamentals of networking. Topics include: the two major models used to plan and implement networks—OSI and TCP/IP; the functions and services of the OSI and TCP/IP layers; the various network devices, network addressing schemes, and the types of media used to carry data across the network. Labs will include hands-on configuration of routers and switches in client-server and peer-to-peer environments with utilization of various network tools for protocol data unit analysis and troubleshooting. Prerequisites: CMSY-106 and ELEC-107, or CMSY-106 and ELEC-140. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CSCO-282 Routing Protocols and Concepts
3 Credits

The focus of this course is on routing and routing protocols. The goal is to develop an understanding of how a router learns about remote networks and determines the best path to those networks. The hands-on labs and virtual lab activities used in this course are designed to help the student develop an understanding of how to configure routing operations while reinforcing the concepts learned. Prerequisite: CSCO-281. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CSCO-283 LAN Switching and Wireless Networks
3 Credits

This course helps students develop an in-depth understanding of how switches operate and are implemented in the LAN environment for small and large networks. Beginning with a foundational overview of Ethernet, this course provides detailed explanations of LAN switch operation, VLAN implementation, Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP), VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP), Inter-VLAN routing, and wireless network operations. Students analyze, configure, verify, and troubleshoot VLANs, RSTP, VTP, and wireless networks. Campus network design and Layer 3 switching concepts are introduced. Prerequisite: CSCO-281. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CSCO-284 Accessing the WAN
3 Credits

This course explains the principles of traffic control and access control lists (ACLs) and provides an overview of the services and protocols at the data link layer for wide-area access. Students learn about user access technologies and devices and discover how to implement and configure Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE), DSL, and Frame Relay. WAN security concepts, tunneling, and VPN basics are introduced. The course concludes with a discussion of the special network services required by converged applications and an introduction to quality of service (QoS). Prerequisites: CSCO-282 and CSCO‑283. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CSCO-305 Cisco IP Telephony
3 Credits
This course concentrates on the fundamental elements of VoIP calls, the description of dial plans, and the implementation of gateways, gatekeepers and IP-IP gateways. This course provides extensive hands-on exercises. This course prepares students to take the Cisco Voice Over IP (CVOICE) certification exam (642-436). Prerequisite: CCNA certification or CSCO-284. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CSCO-308 CCNA Security
3 Credits

This course concentrates on in-depth, theoretical understanding of network security principles as well as the tools and configuration available. This course emphasizes the practical application of skills needed to design, implement, and support network security. This course prepares students to take Implementing Cisco IOS Network Security (IINS) certification exam (640-543). Prerequisite: CCNA certification or CSCO‑284. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CSCO-651 Implementing IP Routing
3 Credits

This course teaches students how to implement, monitor, and maintain routing services in an enterprise network. Students will learn how to plan, configure, and verify the implementation of complex enterprise LAN and WAN routing solutions, using a range of routing protocols in IPv4 and IPv6 environments. The course also covers the configuration of secure routing solutions to support branch offices and mobile workers. Comprehensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce configuration skills. This course prepares students to take the Implementing Cisco IP Routing (ROUTE) 642-902 certification exam. Prerequisites: CSCO-284 or CCNA certification. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CSCO-652 Implementing IP Switching
3 Credits

This course teaches students how to implement, monitor, and maintain switching in converged enterprise campus networks. Students will learn how to plan, configure, and verify the implementation of complex enterprise switching solutions. The course also covers the secure integration of VLANs, WLANs, voice, and video into campus networks. Comprehensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce configuration skills. This course prepares students to take the Implementing Cisco IP Switched Networks (Switch) 642-813 certification exam. Prerequisites: CSCO-284 or CCNA certification. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CSCO-653 Maintaining and Troubleshooting IP Networks
3 Credits

This course teaches students how to monitor and maintain complex, enterprise routed and switched IP networks. Skills learned include the planning and execution of regular network maintenance, as well as supporting and troubleshooting using technology-based processes and best practices, based on systematic and industry recognized approaches. Extensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce troubleshooting techniques. This course prepares students to take the TSHOOT 642-832 certification exam. Prerequisites: CSCO-651 and CSCO-652. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)


COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN

CADD-100 Principles of Drafting
3 Credits

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the language of graphics used in engineering and technology. The student will acquire an understanding of orthographic projections, sections, conventions, threads and fasteners, pictorial drawings, auxiliaries and revolutions. Mechanical assembly and detail drawings, architectural plans and elevations and elements of electrical/electronic and printed circuit drawings are discussed and illustrated. Other topics covered are lettering, scaling, dimensions, holes, fillets, rounds fasteners, fittings and title block specifications. Students use drawing instruments, such as the triangle, ruler and compass and do some free-hand sketching. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CADD-101 Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting and Design
3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the CAD system. The student will receive “hands-on” training and will develop the techniques that are essential in today’s job market. The student will learn how to adapt basic technical drafting techniques to computer generated drawings of the various drafting disciplines. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CADD-103 Intermediate CAD
3 Credits

The student will learn how to adapt the principles of descriptive geometry when applied to “real-world” applications, involving using the Cadd system to create Isometric and 3-D drawings. The student will have the opportunity to work on drawings used in various technical fields, such as ­mechanical engineering, architecture and electronics. The student will learn current production techniques to automate the drawing process and how to develop intelligent technical documents. Prerequisite: CADD-101. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CADD-104 Advanced CAD
3 Credits

The student will learn the programming methods and techniques required to develop an applications package for the CAD system. The students will learn the CAD system’s file structure and how to manipulate its database. The students will learn how to create customized menus and macro programming applications and techniques. Prerequisite: CADD-103. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CADD-105 CAD Projects and Presentations
3 Credits

In this course, the student will combine all the skills and technique of the previous courses to plan and develop a project. The student will learn current production accounting techniques while developing the project. The student will experience the cost factors that directly affect a project. The student will learn the various presentation techniques using computer graphics to enhance the project. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121; CADD-104. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CADD-106 CAD Systems
3 Credits
Prior to taking this course, the student would have acquired an in-depth knowledge and be well-versed in at least one CAD system used in industry. This course is intended to broaden the student’s knowledge in other popular CAD packages by studying similarities and differences of the various commands and techniques. The student will experience the problems of translating between various Cadd systems. The objective of this course is to prepare the student to adapt in an industrial environment quickly and easily to any of the most widely used CAD systems. Prerequisite: CADD-105. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CADD-108 Introduction to Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
3 Credits
In this course, the students will learn the concepts, basic skills and techniques for developing a Geographical Information System (GIS). This course introduces students to the tools and techniques of GIS including spatial data capture, management, and analysis; as well as cartographic output through hands-on experience using GIS software. Emphasis is placed on training in the use of technology and software in order to provide students with skills and a conceptual base on which they can apply to many applications of GIS, such as environmental assessment, analysis of natural hazards, site analysis for business and industry, criminal justice, real estate, location analysis, resource management, and land-use planning. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CADD-120 Three-Dimensional Modeling and Animation
3 Credits

This course will introduce the student to the concepts of 2D/3D computer animation. The student will develop and apply traditional animation techniques using computer software. The applications of computer animation will include engineering, visualization, advertising, and multimedia. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ARTT-120.


COMPUTER FORENSICS

CFOR-101 Computer Forensics I
3 Credits

This course focuses on the emerging role of the computer forensics examiner, forensic evidence preservation and introduces students to computer forensic tools. This course provides a comparative study of information technology, evidence analysis, chain of custody, and data retrieval from computer hardware and software applications. Students will have hands-on laboratory experience using various computer forensic tools, evidence preservation techniques and documentation. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CFOR-120 Computer Forensics Basic Concepts
1 Credit

This course focuses on the fundamental principles of computer forensics methodology and emerging investigation techniques related to the identification, collection and preservation of digital crime scene evidence. This course emphasizes student awareness in handling suspected digital evidence. (1 hour weekly)

CFOR-200 Computer Forensics II
3 Credits

This course is designed to cover advanced concepts in computer forensic analysis, and the development of investigative thinking and awareness. This course covers basic criminal law concepts, related national electronic laws, and sources of electronic information as it applies to computer forensics. Study of data hiding techniques, encryption and password recovery will also be covered. Students will have hands-on laboratory experience using various computer forensic tools, evidence gathering and documentation techniques. Prerequisite: CFOR-101. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CFOR-210 Computer Forensics III
3 Credits
This course covers topics related to advanced concepts in computer forensics and cross validating electronic case data analysis using popular software tools recognized in the computer forensics field. Students will examine electronic communications laws related to PDA’s, cell phones and laptop devices. Students will examine how PDA’s, cell phones and laptop devices operate, store electronic data, and will become familiar with the major manufacturers of these electronic storage devices. Students will develop basic computer forensic interview techniques and skills. Students will have hands-on laboratory experience using various computer forensic tools and prepare evidence. Prerequisite: CFOR-200. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CFOR-250 Computer Network Forensic Technology
3 Credits

This course will cover computer forensics examination process in a network environment. The OSI model, TCP/IP model and IP addressing will be discussed and the relationship and how these layered approaches relate to the computer forensics examination process. Students will determine how various network devices such as servers, hubs, switches and routers create log files that can be used for forensic examination. Students will examine various log files, port scans, and packet sniffers, etc., from network devices for computer forensic analysis. Students will have hands-on experience with actual computer networks in the lab using various forensics tools and devices. Prerequisite: CFOR-210. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)


COMPUTER SYSTEMS

CMSY-101 Beginning Spreadsheets
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use features of Microsoft® Excel that include functions and formulas, formatting, charts, and lists. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has compatible software.

CMSY-102 Beginning Word Processing
1 Credit
After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use beginning features of Microsoft® Word that include creating, formatting, enhancing, and merging documents. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has compatible software. Prerequisite: Keyboarding skills.

CMSY-103 Beginning Databases
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use beginning features of Microsoft® Access that include tables, queries and multiple table queries, forms, and reports. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work may be done outside of class (except tests) if student has compatible software.

CMSY-104 Advanced Word Processing
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use advanced features of Microsoft® Word that include customizing and automating Word’s features; navigating in a document; creating source references, specialized tables and indexes; working with shared documents; and protecting documents. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for the course (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has compatible software. Prerequisite: CMSY-102.

CMSY-105 Personal Computer Systems Repair I
3 Credits
Upon completion of this course, the student will have a basic technical understanding of the function and operation of the major elements of personal computer systems, and how to localize and correct common hardware problems. Students will have hands-on experience using 386, 486 and pentium based systems. The course will ­focus on broad concepts and diagnostic tools which allow the student to rapidly determine the condition of a PC system and how best to rectify a fault. Special emphasis will be placed on how systems are configured, modified, and expanded to meet new requirements. Different software tools like CheckitPro, Norton Utilities and DOS utilities will be used to diagnose the problems. This course, along with CMSY-106, prepares students for the hardware level of A+ certification offered by the Computer Industry Association. The material is preparatory for the follow-on course, CMSY-106, Personal Computer Systems Repair II. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-106 Personal Computer Systems Repair II
3 Credits

Upon completion of this follow-on course, the student will have a basic technical understanding of the function and operation of the major peripheral devices used with or connected to personal computer systems, and how to localize and correct common hardware problems associated with those devices. The major peripheral devices which are emphasized in this course include state-of-the-art data storage devices, display technology, printers, scanners, SCSI devices, multimedia devices, modems, and local area network devices. Emphasis will be placed on techniques for installing, configuring, maintaining, testing and fault isolating these devices within the PC systems. The student will also learn IRQ conflict resolution, I/O address setting, DMA channel conflict resolution, optimizing memory, fine tuning autoexec.bat, config.sys files and Windows initializing files (.ini files) and configuring systems with Windows. This course, along with CMSY-105 - prerequisite, prepares students for the hardware level of A+ certification offered by the Computer Industry Association. Prerequisite: CMSY-105. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-110 Software Applications for Micros
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation graphic software. This course is designed for the beginning student and does not include advanced concepts. Keyboarding skills are strongly recommended. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-116 PowerPoint
1 Credit
After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to design and prepare PowerPoint presentations using slide view, outline view, clip art, charts, drawing tools, and templates. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has compatible software.

CMSY-117 Advanced Spreadsheets
1 Credit
After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use Microsoft® Excel to apply advanced formatting techniques and functions, perform what-if analysis, create PivotTables, use custom and advanced filters, and audit worksheets. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has compatible software. Prerequisite: CMSY-101.

CMSY-118 Advanced Databases
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use Microsoft® Access to create advanced tables, queries, forms and reports. Skills covered also include managing database objects, creating macros, and maintaining relational databases. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has compatible software. Prerequisite: CMSY-103.

CMSY-120 Introduction to Computer Systems
3 Credits

By the end of this course, the student will be able to describe the historical development of computers, the characteristics, components and use of computer systems as well as the major programming languages. The fundamentals of problem solving and programming in a high-level language such as BASIC will be discussed and demonstrated. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121 and MATH-061.

CMSY-121 Structured Logic and Program Design
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to simple algorithm development. Students use pseudo code and flowcharts to represent developed algorithms. A higher-level language will be introduced to implement the developed algorithms into actual computer programs. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121 and MATH-061. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-122 Microsoft Expression Web
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use Microsoft® Expression Web to create a Web site, customize the appearance of a Web site, enhance a design with Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), create and maintain hyperlinks, add and enhance pictures, and publish a Web site. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work (except tests) may be done outside of class if the student has compatible software.

CMSY-123 Microsoft® Office Publisher
1 Credit
After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use Microsoft® Office Publisher to create professional-looking publications for print. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work may be done outside of class if student has compatible software. Prerequisite: CMSY-102.

CMSY-126 Introduction to the Internet
1 Credit (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use the Internet to perform simple searches, use e-mail features, and post to newsgroups. Familiarity with a computer and file management skills are strongly recommended before enrolling in this course. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except the one test) may be done outside of class. Credit will only be granted for one of the following: CMSY-126 or CMSY-129.

CMSY-127 Microsoft® Outlook
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use Microsoft® Outlook to send and receive e‑mails, organize schedules and events, and maintain contact lists, to-do lists, and notes. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has the complete version of Microsoft® Outlook (Not Outlook Web Access).

CMSY-128 Introduction to HTML
1 Credit
After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to create a Web page using HTML, control the format of the page using Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and add graphics to the page. Additional topics covered are ordered and unordered lists and tables. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has compatible software.

CMSY-129 Principles of the Internet
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

The Internet provides worldwide communication capability and access to a vast amount of information. It is also a source of misinformation and attacks on computers. In this course, students learn about popular Internet tools and applications. Students will develop information literacy skills for searching for and evaluating information on the Internet, and will learn to protect their computers and themselves from security threats, hoaxes, and scams. The course introduces business, legal and intellectual property issues as they pertain to the Internet. Students will learn how to create web pages using HTML. Familiarity with a computer, file management skills, and touch typing are strongly recommended for success in this class. Credit will only be granted for one of the following: CMSY-126 or CMSY-129. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-132 Introduction to Windows
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to understand and use Windows. Emphasis is on managing folders and files and customizing the desktop. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this class (except tests) may be done outside of class if the student has Windows. Prerequisite: Familiarity with a computer is strongly recommended.

CMSY-134 Introduction to Operating Systems
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to define and explain the purpose of basic MS-DOS Command Line and Windows. In addition, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in file management concepts in both MS-DOS and Windows. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who want to work toward A+ certification. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class if the student has the appropriate operating systems.

CMSY-136 Integrated Software Applications
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use the integration features of Microsoft® Office to copy, paste, link, and embed files from one program to another using Word, Excel, Access, and PowerPoint. Basic through advanced integration skills are covered. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work may be done outside of class if student has compatible software. Prerequisites: CMSY-101, CMSY-103, CMSY-104, CMSY‑116, and CMSY‑126.

CMSY-141 Computer Science I
4 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the C++ programming language - from basic algorithm development to object-oriented programming. Upon successful completion, students will be able to write C++ programs of moderate complexity and length which include standard data types, control structures, user written and library functions, arrays, pointers, structures, recursion, stream I/O, and simple classes and objects. Pre- or corequisite: MATH-181 and eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-142 Operating System Fundamentals I
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and use the functions, structure, and major system files of operating systems. This will include procedures for creating, reviewing, and managing files, directories, and disks. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who want to work toward A+ certification. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class if the student has the appropriate operating systems. Prerequisite: CMSY-134.

CMSY-143 Operating System Fundamentals II
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to explain how to support hard drives, manage memory, maintain, and troubleshoot Windows. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who want to work toward A+ certification. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class if the student has the appropriate operating systems. Prerequisite: CMSY-142.

CMSY-145 Internet Security and Risk Management
3 Credits

Students will learn about ways of protecting an ebusiness against unique risks and exposures, will explore insurance coverages (and their exclusions) that are specific to electronic business, and steps business managers should take to manage risks. This course examines ways in which technological advances in computer and operating systems have placed data, as a tangible asset, at risk. This course is an overview of internet security and risk management issues. It is not designed to train students to be security experts or to implement security systems. Prerequisite: (CMSY-126 and CMSY-139) or CMSY-129. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-147 Introduction to Web Site Authoring
3 Credits

This course introduces students to software for creating web sites, including GUI HTML programs, web image creation software, and multimedia creation for the web. It also introduces principles of web site design. Familiarity with a computer and file managment skills are strongly recommended before enrolling in this course. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-152 JavaScript
1 Credit

This course is an introduction to computer programming using JavaScript. It will present intermediate topics needed to create, design, write, test, debug and document programs to run on client machines with JavaScript. This course is designed to teach the JavaScript used in DHTML and to teach computer programming skills that can be used in learning other programming languages, especially those that work with HTML. Prerequisite: CMSY-168 OR CMSY-121. (1 hour weekly)

CMSY-153 Introduction to Flash
3 Credits

This course will provide students with the skills to design and develop interactive computer materials for web sites, education and business training, and other multimedia projects using Macromedia Flash MX. Students will master the basics of drawing and creating animations. Then students will learn how to add buttons and sounds, manage assets using the library, organize projects in scenes, and apply basic ActionScript statements. Finally, students will learn how to use bitmaps, gradients, and publish movies with Flash. Familiarity and experience with the World Wide Web is assumed. Computer file management skills and introductory HTML skills are needed for success in this class. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-154 Protecting the Virtual Office
3 Credits
Recent developments on the Internet, such as Social Web and Virtual Worlds, have improved our ability to communicate globally, while increasing our access to larger amounts of business information. In addition to these positive changes, we have also seen the Internet become a source of misinformation and various network security vulnerabilities. In this course, students will learn about both network and workstation level threats, and how to protect against them. Familiarity with computer operating systems, security tools such as personal firewalls and virus protection, along with basic file management skills and touch typing are strongly recommended for success in this class. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-160 Data Communication
3 Credits

This course provides introductory information in the field of Data Communication. It is meant to prepare those students with a minimal background in the network security field with foundational knowledge and skills required to be successful in subsequent courses and the related career field. In this course, students will study the basic concepts of networking such as OSI model, different types of physical communication media, LAN, MAN, WAN, concepts of routing, IP protocol, subnetting, and TCP protocol. Additionally, some information security aspects such as privacy, authentication, and integrity will be discussed. This course includes practical labs in which students apply the theory material of the course. Students will learn how to implement and protect networks. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-161 Computer and Internet Basics
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to work toward the Internet and Core Computing Certification (IC3). After successful completion of this course, the student will have basic competencies in computing fundamentals, software applications, and the Internet. This course is designed for the beginning student and does not include advanced concepts. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-162 Introduction to Network Security Systems
3 Credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of network security in preparation for advanced courses. It will give students a solid foundation for understanding different security technologies and how they function. They will also be able to design a basic network with the proper network security structures in place. This course is designed as an entry-level Information Assurance class, but it is highly recommended that students have a background in computer and network administration. After taking this course, students should be prepared to take the CompTIA Security+ exam. A good understanding of the Windows and Linux operating systems, and TCP/IP protocol, or an extensive background in network administration is highly recommended. Prerequisite: CMSY-160 or appropriate CMSY placement test score. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-163 Introduction to Firewalls and Network Security
3 Credits

This course is designed to give students experience with firewall hardware and software. Different firewall systems will be illustrated, and students will be given the opportunity to install and configure them. The course is designed with a network administrator in mind. An extensive background in network administration, or a computer professional with an MCSE or equivalent would have adequate background knowledge for waiver. Prerequisites: CMSY-162. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-164 Introduction to Intrusion Detection Systems
3 Credits

From this introduction to intrusion detection systems, students will develop a solid foundation for understanding IDS and how they function. This course will give students a background in the technology of detecting network attacks. It will introduce all the concepts and procedures used for IDS (Intrusion Detection Systems) and IPS (Intrusion Prevention Systems). Students will have hands-on experience with implementing and configuring software and hardware based IDS in a network infrastructure. This course is designed with a network administrator in mind. A fairly extensive background in network administration, or a computer professional with an MCSE or equivalent would have adequate background knowledge for waiver. Prerequisites: CMSY-162 or CMSY-163. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-168 Developing for the Web
3 Credits

This course presents in-depth coverage of HTML, XHTML, and CSS (cascading style sheets). Students will learn the core technologies of front-end development - HTML, XHTML, CSS, and DOM (Document Object Model).  The course also reviews recommended practices for creating accessible websites, semantic markup, and emerging technologies.  A conceptual overview, design issues, and practical development issues are interwoven.  Familiarity with basic HTML is assumed. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-169 Mobile Design and Development Principles
3 Credits

The principles and attributes of mobile website and application development are unlike any other approaches on the market and are considerably different from its desktop predecessor. This course provides an overview of the basic principles and theory behind mobile development. Key topics covered will include design functionality, design marketing, phone platforms, and mobile operating systems. Students will receive a firm understanding of how to create a development strategy, address the mobile context, how to decide which of the multiple mobile development types is best for a customer, and how to create a user experience for it. Students will utilize these core principles to design and implement both a mobile website and basic mobile application. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-171 Computer Science II
4 Credits
This course covers advanced topics in the C++ programming language - from advance OOP concepts to data structure implementation. Upon successful completion, students will be able to write C++ programs which include sorting and searching algorithms, STL containers, advance file I/O with both text and binary files, advanced object-oriented programming concepts such as operator overloading, inheritance, and polymorphism, and advance data structures such as linked lists, stacks, queues, and binary trees. Prerequisite: CMSY-141. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-181 Introduction to C++ Programming
4 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the C++ programming language - from basic algorithm development to object-oriented programming. Upon successful completion, students will be able to write C++ programs of moderate complexity and length which include standard data types, control structures, user written and library functions, arrays, pointers, structures, recursion, stream I/O, and simple classes and objects. Prerequisite: CMSY-121 or CMSY-190. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-190 Introduction to Visual Basic.NET
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, students will have acquired the skills needed to design, write, test, debug and document programs using Visual Basic.NET. Topics covered will include: using variables, selection constructs, looping, procedures and functions, array processing, simple file manipulations, and various VB controls. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121 and MATH-061. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-195 Intermediate Visual Basic.NET
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to incorporate intermediate coding techniques and powerful graphical controls into their Visual Basic projects. Major topics include: programming a database; mouse events, keyboard events and trappable errors; grid controls; object variables and collections; the Multiple Document Interface (MDI); and an introduction to the Windows environment. Prerequisite: CMSY-190. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-199 Introduction to Java
3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the Java programming language. Topics include input/output, data types, operators, control statements, methods, the Java API, arrays, classes, objects, interfaces, and exception handling. The object-oriented programming paradigm and design principles will be emphasized throughout the course. Prerequisite: CMSY-141 or CMSY-181 or CMSY-190. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-201-202 Computer Systems Work
Experience I and II
3 or 4 Credits

See COOP-201-202 Cooperative Education Work Experience I and II.

CMSY-203 Introduction to PHP
3 Credits

PHP is an open source server-side scripting language used to create dynamic, data-driven websites for such applications as web-based content management and display systems. It performs many of the same functions as ASP and ColdFusion. In this course students will learn how to use several features of this scripting language. Students will write scripting code within the class and in assignments outside of class. Prerequisite: CMSY-121. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-205 Advanced JavaScript
3 Credits
This course provides comprehensive instruction in JavaScript. It will present both intermediate and advanced topics needed to create, design, write, test, debug and document programs to run on client machines with JavaScript. Prerequisite: CMSY-168 or CMSY-152. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-211 Web Tools For Successful Business
3 Credits

Students will learn how to improve a business’ access to information using new web technologies. Effective use of new tools such as mashups will create new customer services, provide economic advantage for the business owner, and incorporate real-world applications. The course will focus on new features of websites, increasing levels of personalization and creation of different tools to increase effectiveness of business web-sites. Discussion of legal and ethical challenges, as well as strategic and tactical issues, will be a strong element of this course. (4 hours weekly)

CMSY-212 Virtual Process Management in Business
3 Credits

This course uses a problem-solving, project-based approach to involve students in real-life business management issues. Focusing on such areas as human resources, customer service, marketing, and financial issues, students will resolve situations employing forward-looking virtual technology with consideration of the global arena. Students will exit the course with a theoretical and practical ability to use elements of the virtual environment for business activities. Familiarity with browsers, internet concepts, and personal computers is recommended for course success. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-217  Intermediate Java
3 Credits
This course builds on the foundations from Introduction to Java and expands the coverage to more advanced topics. Topics include recursion, searching and sorting algorithms, data structures, Java Collections Framework, Generics, multithreading, network programming, JDBC, and Servlets/JSP. The Java 2D API and Swing Tollkit will also be presented. Prerequisite: CMSY-199. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-218 Operating System Fundamentals
3 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to define and explain the purpose of basic DOS and Windows operating system components with an emphasis on file management. In addition, the student will be able to identify and use the functions, structure, and major system files of operating systems. This will include a survey and comparison of major operating systems and MS-DOS commands needed for troubleshooting situations. In addition, the student will learn how to install and use the various versions of Windows. This course is designed to meet the needs of students who want to work toward A+ certification. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)

CMSY-219 Microcomputer Operating Systems
3 Credits

In this course, students will examine the operation of the system software of a microcomputer (Microsoft Operating System). The student will be able to use the system commands to create and alter the microcomputer environment. The goal of this course is to familiarize each student with the operating system software, define the role of the software, and to train each student in the proper use of the operating system software. Prerequisite: CMSY-110 or CADD-101. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-248 Introduction to XML
3 Credits

This introductory class will teach students how to create documents that define data in XML, use rules of XML syntax, and format data in XML. Students will also study XHTML and its relation to HTML and XML. Prerequisite: CMSY-168 and (CMSY-103 or CMSY-110). (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-249 Introduction to Perl
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to computer programming using Perl. It will present intermediate topics needed to create, design, write, test, debug and document programs to run Perl on an Apache web server. Prerequisite: CMSY-121. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-250 Systems Analysis and Design
3 Credits

By the end of this course, the student will be able to analyze an organization’s existing procedures by using such tools as data analysis sheets, system flowcharts, process charts, GANTT charts, decision tables and documents which define system requirements and specifications. The overall goal of the course is for the student to be prepared to go through the process necessary to improve the functioning of an existing system or to design a new one. Prerequisite: CMSY-121. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-255 Introduction to Unix and Linux
3 Credits

The course provides an introduction to the Unix and Linux operating systems. The goal of this course is to provide the student with and understanding of the Unix and Linux command line so that students will be able to customize a Unix/Linux environment under the Shell environment. Prerequisite: CMSY-219. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-256 Linux Server Administration
3 Credits

This course provides the core foundation for supporting Linux. Students will perform system administration tasks, and install and configure a Linux workstation to an existing network. Prerequisite: CMSY-255. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-262 Encryption and VPN Technology
3 Credits

This course will instruct students how to identify and apply principles of encryption, as well as the methodology to install and validate a VPN. The concepts of virtual private networks and data encryption will become part of the student’s skill set. This course is designed with a network administrator in mind. A fairly extensive background in network administration, or a computer professional with an MCSE or equivalent would have adequate background knowledge for waiver. Prerequisites: CMSY-162 and CMSY-163. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-263 Hardening the Network Infrastructure
3 Credits
Hardening the Network Infrastructure is designed to teach students how to properly secure critical network systems. Students will use various tools to audit a network, in order to determine where network vulnerabilities exist. Once these weaknesses are documented, the student will harden their network infrastructure to avoid breaches into their respective systems. End Point security aspects will be discussed for a holistic security solution. This course is designed with a network security professional in mind. An extensive background focused in network security administration, or a computer professional with an MCSE or equivalent would have adequate background knowledge for waiver. Prerequisites: CMSY-163 and CMSY-164. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-264 Successful CISSP Preparation
3 Credits
The Computer Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) designation is particularly useful for those who are focused on managing either process or people responsible for activities related to the design, implementation and administration of an information security infrastructure. Topics will include practical aspects of law and forensics, physical and operations security, technical elements of networking and encryption and basic tenets of access control, security models and management practices. Upon completion of the course, the student will have a framework necessary to successfully complete the CISSP exam. Three to four years of related experience are needed to sit for this exam. Testing instruments similar to the CISSP examination will be used to demonstrate comprehension during midterm and noncumulative final exams. (3 hours weekly)

CMSY-276  Multimedia Hardware
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, the student will have a basic technical understanding of the function and operation of the multimedia devices used with or connected to personal computer systems. The student will understand how to install, test, and use multimedia devices such as mass storage devices, CD-ROMs, soundcards, scanners, digital cameras, video capture cards, and touch screens. The course will focus on broad concepts and diagnostic tools which allow the student to rapidly configure or rectify faults in multimedia PC systems. Prerequisite: CMSY-132 and hardware familiarity is recommended. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CMSY-281 Advanced C++ Programming
4 Credits

This course covers advance topics in the C++ programming language - from advance OOP concepts to data structure implementation. Upon successful completion, students will be able to write C++ programs which include sorting and searching algorithms, STL containers, advance file I/O with both text and binary files, advanced object-oriented programming concepts such as operator overloading, inheritance, and polymorphism, and advance data structures such as linked lists, stacks, queues, and binary trees. Prerequisite: CMSY-181. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)


CONFLICT RESOLUTION

CRES-155 Introduction to Conflict Resolution: Science and Art
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

The purpose of “Introduction to Conflict Resolution: Science and Art” is to introduce students to both different perspectives on conflict and different strategies for resolving conflict. Conflict will be explored in different contexts, including intergroup conflict, cross-cultural conflict, and international conflict, with an emphasis on interpersonal conflict. Most importantly, students will be asked to reflect on their own style of conflict resolution and the pertinence of the material covered to conflict resolution in their own lives. Course content will include experiential learning and role play. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-155.

CRES-201 Conflict and Process
3 Credits
This course provides students with knowledge about different conflict resolution processes–e.g., mediation, negotiation, arbitration, and facilitation. Role plays will be used to demonstrate the use of these processes and to provide students with an opportunity to practice conflict resolution skills. Prerequisites: CRES-155/HEED-155. (3 hours weekly)

CRES-202 Dynamics of Social Conflict
3 Credits
This course will explore the social conflict that results from problems such as structural racism, disproportionate minority confinement in our prisons, economic inequality, and gender discrimination, which continue to be social problems that define United States culture. As such these problems have resulted in not only the attention of observers as noted by Case, but also in major social movements which have had varying degrees of success in making sustainable improvements in human interaction in our society. These four problems in particular, because of the irresoluteness of their nature often underlie conflict at the interpersonal, neighbor-to­‑neighbor, community, political jurisdiction, and/or ethnic/identity group level. Particular attention will be paid to case studies which illuminate racism, gender discrimination and class inequality. Students will generate potential resolutions to cases through the application of dispute resolution theories and techniques. Prerequisites: CRES-201. (3 hours weekly)

CRES-225 Sociology of Conflict and Non-Violence
3 Credits

This course examines why humans engage in conflict, why violence is employed to resolve conflict and the nature and practice of non-violent conflict resolution. Students will explore the social forces that produce conflict–including cultural, economic, and psychological–and the arenas in which conflict occurs–including family, community, nation and world. Within an interdisciplinary framework (using social sciences and humanities), students will learn the theoretical, historical, practical, and political aspects of violent and non-violent conflict. Special attention will be given to emerging social and global conflicts, including examination of how or if these conflicts might be resolved in a non-violent manner. Prerequisite: SOCI-101 or SOCI-102. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as SOCI-225.


COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

COOP-150 Job Search: Skills and Techniques
1 Credit

This course is designed for all students who want to develop skills for seeking and securing employment. Through this course students will enhance their skills in job hunting by concentrating efforts into such areas as resume writing, interviewing and job search techniques. (2 hours weekly, 7 weeks)

COOP-160 Portfolio Development
3 Credits

This course is designed for students who wish to receive credit for learning gained from life experience. In this course students will document evidence of prior learning in a “portfolio” which will enable faculty to evaluate and award credit for specific HCC courses. The student will learn to collect, organize, document and verify evidence of prior learning as well as assess skills and abilities and clarify career goals. Prerequisite: ENGL-121 or ENGL-101 and consent of the instructor.

COOP-190 Internship I
1-2 Credits

Upon completion of this course, students will have enhanced skills by linking concepts and theories with application and understanding through experiential opportunities in a workplace setting. Student must receive prior approval to register for this work experience course. Call the Counseling and Career Center at 443-518-1340.

COOP-191 Internship II
1-2 Credits

Upon completion of this course, students will have enhanced skills by linking concepts and theories with application and understanding through experiential opportunities in a workplace setting. Student must receive prior approval to register for this work experience course. Call the Counseling and Career Center at 443-518-1340. Prerequisite: COOP-190.

COOP-201 Cooperative Education Work Experience I
3-4 Credits

Cooperative Education is supervised work experience directly related to a student’s major subject area and/or career goals and interests. Its basic purposes are to integrate classroom theory and work applications and to assist the student in making the transition from school to work. New or current positions may qualify for co-op credits. Students may work between 10 and 40 hours a week for a 10- or 15-week period, attend seven 80-minute seminars during the semester, achieve specific learning objectives, and submit reports to a faculty co-op advisor. Prerequisites: minimum of 12 credits completed at HCC with a 2.0 or better grade point average and demonstration of pre-employment skills. Student must receive prior approval to register for this work experience course. Call the Counseling and Career Center at 443-518-1340.

COOP-202 Cooperative Education Work Experience II
3-4 Credits

See course description for COOP-201.


CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRIM-101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
3 Credits

A survey of the history, philosophy and social development of police, courts and corrections in a democratic society. Identification and operations of local, state and federal agencies will be covered with criminal justice career orientation. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-102 Criminology
3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the basic theories, fundamental facts, and problems associated with the science of criminology, while providing a systematic basis for the study of criminals, and criminal behavior as it relates to the criminal justice system in America. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-103 Juvenile Delinquency
3 Credits

This course studies youthful crime; its volume, causes, and trends. The prediction, prevention, treatment and control of juvenile delinquency by social control agencies is examined relative to social policies needed to reduce its incidence. The organization and procedures of the juvenile justice system will be explored. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-105 Introduction to Corrections
3 Credits

This course introduces the student to the field of corrections, as it relates to the justice system. The course will focus on the history of corrections and the forms of criminal sanctions at the federal, state and local levels. Prerequisite: CRIM-101. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-106 Street Law: Introduction to Law and Legal Issues
3 Credits

This course will cover the evaluation, debate, and critical analysis of law and legal issues that affect individuals, their families, and communities. Students will learn about practical aspects of civil, criminal, constitutional, family, immigration, and consumer law in a diverse society with an orientation toward civic involvement in the local community. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-110 Criminal Investigation
3 Credits
This course focuses on the fundamental principles and procedures employed in the investigation of crime; emphasizes investigation of specific crimes, identification of information sources and procedures required for the handling of evidence and the development of a working knowledge of investigation techniques. Only students authorized by the Howard County Police Department Academy are eligible to enroll in this course. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-120 Patrol Operations
3 Credits

This course focuses on the basic police patrol methods used in a modern law enforcement agency environment. Students will develop multi-tasking skills and critical thinking skills necessary for performing effective patrol responsibilities. Only students authorized by the Howard County Police Department Academy are eligible to enroll in this course. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-126 Vehicle Law and Accident Investigation
3 Credits

This course focuses on Maryland and Federal vehicle laws, types of vehicle offenses, safety principles, citation and arrest procedures, and accident investigation procedures; details procedures and coding for the Maryland Automated Accident Reporting System. Only students authorized by the Howard County Police Department Academy are eligible to enroll in this course. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-128 Emergency Vehicle Operations
3 Credits

This course is designed to meet the MPCTC minimum training objectives and requirements for every entry-level police officer in the State of Maryland in the safe operation of an emergency vehicle. Only students authorized by the Howard County Police Department Academy are eligible to enroll in this course. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-130 Police Defensive Tactics
5 Credits

This course focuses on the principles and practical aspects of personal safety; covers methods and tactics of practical self defense including alternatives for situational defense strategies; provides rigorous conditioning exercises; develops skills in perception, analysis, escape, compromise, avoidance, blocking, throwing, and striking. Only students authorized by the Howard County Police Department Academy are eligible to enroll in this course. (5 hours weekly)

CRIM-132 Police Arsenal and Procedures
5 Credits

This course focuses on law enforcement weaponry and, specifically, the handgun, ASP baton, OC spray and other lethal and non-lethal weapons. The proper care, maintenance and use of the various weapons are highlighted. Each student will be required to demonstrate their proficiency with the various issued weapons. Only students authorized by the Howard County Police Department Academy are eligible to enroll in this course. (5 hours weekly)

CRIM-190-191 Criminal Justice Internships I and II
3-4 Credits
See COOP-201-202 Cooperative Education Work Experience I and II. The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives designed to broaden the educational experience. Students are assigned to ­appropriate governmental and private criminal justice agencies.

CRIM-200 Law Enforcement and the Community
3 Credits
A study of the relationship between police and the community with recommendations for ways of working together to reduce crime. Emphasis is placed on policing in a culturally diverse society. Prerequisite: CRIM-101. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-201 Introduction to Criminal Law
3 Credits
The study of substantive criminal law as applied to the local, state and federal systems. Crimes as prosecuted in a court of law are examined. Court decisions are used to address various sources and types of criminal laws. Prerequisite: CRIM-101. (3 hours weekly)

CRIM-210 Criminal Evidence and Procedure
3 Credits

Examines the principles and techniques of criminal procedure employed during trials to determine the admissibility of physical and testimonial evidence. An analysis of laws and court decisions relating to the admissibility is emphasized. Prerequisite: CRIM-101. (3 hours weekly)


CULINARY MANAGEMENT

CMGT-100 Culinary Basics
1 Credit

This course introduces the student to the field of culinary arts. Students will learn basic fundamentals and techniques associated with becoming a professional chef. Topics covered include knife skills, cooking techniques, product identification, and an overview of the history of and careers within the culinary arts profession. (1 hour weekly)

CMGT-110 Culinary Supervision
2 Credits

The culinary supervision course is designed for individuals pursuing a career within the culinary arts field. The course is designed to blend culinary theory with management principles and basic supervisory skills. Students will learn such topics as basic kitchen management, planning and organization skills, making personnel decisions, managing different cultures, training and developing kitchen staff, and basic profit and loss management. (2 hours weekly)

CMGT-130 Garde Manger
3 Credits

This course focuses on the methods and theories relating to cold food production and presentation. Topics covered in the course include the preparation of fruits and vegetables, canapés and hors d’oeurves, charcuterie, pates and terrines, platter and other buffet displays. Students will learn not only preparation of cold foods but also proper handling and presentation of cold food items. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CMGT-135 Baking and Pastries
3 Credits

This course focuses on the fundamentals of basic baking. Baking fundamentals include the process of understanding ingredients, weights and measurements, formula conversion and costing of recipes. Students will also use equipment associated with baking and develop different types of breads, pastries, and pastry related showpieces. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CMGT-200 International Cuisine
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide students with information about the history, culture, and cuisine of many international regions. Students will research, report and prepare products using ingredients and preparation methods indigenous to that geographical region. The course will utilize demonstrations and group participation exercises to supplement the students’ development of technical skills and knowledge. Prerequisites: HMGT-120. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CMGT-210 Culinary Management Internship
2 Credits
Student will spend at least 240 hours of directed study in a chosen area of the culinary industry at an off‑campus facility. The faculty instructor and industry mentor will provide and coordinate course objectives, applicable experiences and evaluation. Students will research a problem that is unique to the mentor’s operation and maintain a written journal of internship experiences. Prerequisite: HMGT-120 and either HMGT-101 or CMGT-101. (Weekly field experience)

CMGT-230 Plated Desserts
3 Credits
In this course students will learn industry acceptable procedures for producing both hot and cold plated desserts as they apply to a dessert buffet. The course is designed to expose students to current foodservice trends. Demonstrations and group participation exercises will supplement the students’ development of technical skills and knowledge. Prerequisite: CMGT-135. (3 hours weekly)

CMGT-235 International Breads
2 Credits

This course is designed to expose students to the history and production of breads and bread products from many international cultures. Students will prepare breads using ingredients and preparation methods indigenous to that geographical region. The course will utilize demonstrations and group participation exercises to supplement the students’ development of technical skills and knowledge. Prerequisites: CMGT-135. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

CMGT-240 Baking and Pastry Showpieces
3 Credits
This course provides students with practical knowledge and experience in creating a variety of decorative centerpieces used to enhance pastry carts, high-end catering, buffets and other culinary displays. Prerequisites: CMGT-135. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

CMGT-250 Cake Decorating and Candy Making
3 Credits

This course is designed to advance the student’s knowledge of various fine decorating techniques. Emphasis will be placed on perfection of decorating style and presentation. Basic sugar and chocolate candy making techniques will be explored. Prerequisites: CMGT-135. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)


DANCE

DANC-100 Introduction to Dance
3 Credits

This class includes floor and standing work to increase joint mobility, efficient movement patterns, core strength, proper support for dance movement and development of upper/lower connectivity. This course also includes the study of Western concert dance as a cultural phenomenon, methods of training, evolution of dance aesthetics and building a worldview through movement. European and American dance forms: Ballet, Modern/Contemporary Dance, Jazz Dance, Musical Theatre, and some Global Dance are studied. This course serves as a foundation to prepare the student for course work in Ballet, Modern Dance, and Jazz Dance. This course is designed for students with little or no previous dance experience. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-101 Movement Integration
3 Credits

Floor and standing work to develop upper/lower connectivity, increased rotation, reduced tension, efficient movement patterns, integrated muscular control and coordination and proper support for dance movement. Variety of methods for movement observation and analysis, process of perception, body organization, spatial investigation and anatomical principles. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-103 Dance History Through Criticism
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

In this course, dance history is approached through the writings of dance critics and historians. The challenge to the student is to develop an analytical and critical evaluation of the art of dance. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-104 Hip-Hop Dance
1 Credit
This course will introduce students to contemporary hip-hop dance technique. Students will demonstrate hip-hop dance skills through warm-ups and choreographed routines. This class will also explore the culture and music of hip-hop and other related styles of dance such as locking, popping, and other club dance styles. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-105 Belly Dancing
1 Credit
This course will focus on training students to understand and perform belly dance. Movement includes basic isolation and moves with the head, shoulders, arms, hands, chest, belly, hips, and feet as well as techniques which incorporate the entire body. Students will also learn about the different music, history, and culture of this dance style. Students will demonstrate mastery of belly dance through choreographed and non-choreographed class performances. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-105.

DANC-106, 107, 206, 207 Practicum in Choreography, Performance or Production
1 Credit

Self-directed study of a creative project designed to focus on a specialized area of dance for presentation in a Dance Department production. Dance majors may opt to participate in production in either stage managing, costume, set, or lighting design capacities. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-110 Ballroom and Latin Dance
1 Credit

This course will focus on training students to understand and perform basic ballroom and Latin steps, turns, and partnering. Students will also learn the rhythms, history, and culture of each style. Students will demonstrate mastery of these styles through choreographed and non-choreographed class performances. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-110.

DANC-114 History and Culture of Hip-Hop
3 Credits

This course will expose students to the elements of Hip-Hop culture, including graffiti, emceeing, deejaying, and dance forms like locking, popping, and b-boying. The influence of West African culture will be discussed as will Hip-Hop’s American roots, its development and history, and its influence on American and world culture. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FINE-114.

DANC-135  Foundations in Dance Technique I
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide students who are registered for DANC-165 and/or DANC-175 with supplemental practice and theory in areas that are fundamental to the learning goals in those classes. Subject matter includes somatic literacy, experiential anatomy and kinesiology, rhythmic analysis, Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) and Bartenieff Fundamentals (BF), support modalities for dance, conditioning and wellness. This course is both teacher-directed and student-centered. Emphasis is placed on those areas which best address the particular needs of the students in the class, but all material above is covered. Corequisite: DANC-165 or DANC-175. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-136 Foundations in Dance Technique II
1 Credit

This course is a continuation of DANC-135 and is designed to provide students who are registered for DANC-166 and/or DANC-176 with continued supplemental practice and theory in areas that are fundamental to the learning goals in those classes. Subject matter includes somatic literacy, experiential anatomy and kinesiology, rhythmic analysis, Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals, support modalities for dance, conditioning and wellness. This course is both teacher-directed and student-centered. Emphasis is placed on those areas which best address the particular needs of the students in the class, but all material above is covered. Corequisite: DANC-166 or DANC-176. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-137 Foundations in Dance Technique III
1 Credit
This course is a continuation of DANC-135 and DANC-136 and is designed to provide students who are registered for DANC-167 and/or DANC-177 with continued supplemental practice and theory in areas that are fundamental to the learning goals in those classes. Subject matter includes somatic literacy, experiential anatomy and kinesiology, rhythmic analysis, Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals, support modalities for dance, conditioning and wellness. This course is both teacher-directed and student-centered. Emphasis is placed on those areas which best address the particular needs of the students in the class, but all material above is covered. Corequisite: DANC-167 or DANC-177. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-138 Foundations in Dance Technique IV
1 Credit

This course is a continuation of DANC-135, DANC-136, and DANC-137 and is designed to provide students who are registered for DANC-168 and/or DANC-178 with continued supplemental practice and theory in areas that are fundamental to the learning goals in those classes. Subject matter includes somatic literacy, experiential anatomy and kinesiology, rhythmic analysis, Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals, support modalities for dance, conditioning and wellness. This course is both teacher-directed and student-centered. Emphasis is placed on those areas which best address the particular needs of the students in the class, but all material above is covered. Corequisite: DANC-168 or DANC-178. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-140 Dance Workshop
2 Credits
This course is designed to provide the dance major with a guided practical experience in the process of creating a dance from inception of idea to production. This course is the introductory course in the Creative Process series in the Dance Performance degree requirement. It will serve as pre-requisite to DANC-150 (Dance Improvisation) and DANC-250 (Dance Composition). The course will provide fundamental knowledge and practice in aspects of creation and composition necessary for successful choreography. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-150 Dance Improvisation
3 Credits

This course will provide students with guided exploration in the elements of dance for the creative development of personal movement repertoire, spontaneous group interaction, and choreographic and movement observation skills. It emphasizes the exploration of movement through spur-of-the-moment problem solving and creative risk-taking. This course is designed to evoke the student’s creative individuality and sense of ensemble. It may also include weight-sharing and contact improvisation. Prerequisite: DANC-100 or DANC-140 or DANC-160 or DANC-170 or DANC-192. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-160 Introduction to Ballet Technique
2 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of classical ballet technique with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body, and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a basic technical foundation. This course also introduces ballet history and terminology. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-161  Beginning Ballet Technique I
2 Credits

This course provides a foundation for classical ballet at the beginning level with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, and vocabulary of ballet. Students at this level must be competent at the introductory level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-162  Beginning Ballet Technique II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-161 and provides a reinforcement of the fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, and vocabulary of ballet. Students at this level must be competent at the introductory level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-161. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-163 Beginning Ballet Technique III
2 Credits
This course is a continuation of DANC-161 and DANC-162 and provides a reinforcement of the fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, and vocabulary of ballet. Students at this level must be competent at the introductory level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-162. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-164 Beginning Ballet Technique IV
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-161, DANC-162 and DANC-163 and provides a reinforcement of the fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, and vocabulary of ballet. Students at this level must be competent at the introductory level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-163. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-165 Intermediate Ballet Technique I
2 Credits

This course provides a reinforcement of the fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, vocabulary, and history of ballet. Students at this level must be competent at the beginning level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-166 Intermediate Ballet Technique II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-165 and provides a continued reinforcement of the fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, vocabulary, and history of ballet. Students at this level must be competent at the beginning level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-165. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-167 Intermediate Ballet Technique III
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-165 and DANC-166 and provides a continued reinforcement of the fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, vocabulary, and history of ballet. Students at this level must be competent at the beginning level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-166. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-168 Intermediate Ballet Technique IV
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-165, DANC-166, and DANC-167 and provides a continued reinforcement of the fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, vocabulary, and history of ballet. Students at this level must be competent at the beginning level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-167. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-170 Introduction to Modern Dance Technique
2 Credits

This course is designed as introduction to the basic principles of modern dance. It includes the study of level change, floor work, weight shift, dynamic alignment, and expression as well as an introduction to modern dance theories and history. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-171 Beginning Modern Dance Technique I
2 Credits

This course provides a foundation for modern dance techniques at the beginning level with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, and vocabulary of modern dance. Students at this level must be competent at the introductory level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-172 Beginning Modern Dance Technique II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-171 and provides a reinforcement of the fundamentals of modern dance techniques with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, and vocabulary of modern dance. Students at this level must be competent at the introductory level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-171. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-173 Beginning Modern Dance Technique III
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-171 and DANC-172 and provides a reinforcement of the fundamentals of modern dance techniques with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, and vocabulary of modern dance. Students at this level must be competent at the introductory level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-172. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-174 Beginning Modern Dance Technique IV
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-171, DANC-172 and DANC-173 and provides a reinforcement of the fundamentals of modern dance techniques with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, and vocabulary of modern dance. Students at this level must be competent at the introductory level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-173. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-175 Intermediate Modern Dance Technique I
2 Credits

This course provides a reinforcement of the fundamentals of modern dance techniques with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, vocabulary, and history of modern dance. Students at this level must be competent at the beginning level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-176 Intermediate Modern Dance Technique II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-175 and provides a continued reinforcement of the fundamentals of modern dance techniques with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, vocabulary, and history of modern dance. Students at this level must be competent at the beginning level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-175. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-177 Intermediate Modern Dance Technique III
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-175 and DANC-176 and provides a continued reinforcement of the fundamentals of modern dance techniques with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, vocabulary, and history of modern dance. Students at this level must be competent at the beginning level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-176. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-178 Intermediate Modern Dance Technique IV
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-175, DANC-176 and DANC-177 and provides a continued reinforcement of the fundamentals of modern dance techniques with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. This course provides further development of knowledge, skills, abilities and appreciation through daily practice, vocabulary, and history of modern dance. Students at this level must be competent at the beginning level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences. Prerequisite: DANC-177. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-181 Ballet I
2 Credits

An introduction to the fundamentals of classical ballet technique with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body, and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a basic technical foundation. Introduction to ballet history and terminology includes barre work. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-182 Ballet II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-181, Ballet I, at a higher level of proficiency. A reinforcement of the fundamentals of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body, and other preparatory work necessary for the establishment of a sound technical foundation. A continued study of ballet history, technique and theory. Prerequisite: DANC-181. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-186 Modern Dance I
2 Credits
An introduction to the basic principles of modern dance. Study of level change, floor work, weight shift, dynamic alignment, and expression. Introduction to modern dance theories and history. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-187 Modern Dance II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-186, Modern Dance I, at a higher level of proficiency. An expanded study in the basic principles of modern dance. Emphasis on greater expression, heightened kinesthetic, spatial and musical awareness. Course work continues study of various modern dance theories and history. Prerequisite: DANC-186. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-188 African Dance
2 Credits

An exploration of dance movements from primitive African and Caribbean as well as contemporary jazz dance with the physiological benefit of aerobic exercise. Students will become aware of the ancient origin of all movements performed. Course work will include stretching to improve flexibility, body alignment to foster good posture, sustained movement to increase cardiovascular fitness. Much of class time will be spent in developing stamina, flexibility and in learning and performing choreography. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-190 Dance Appreciation
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

An introductory survey of dance as a performing art which will prepare the student for greater enjoyment and appreciation of various dance forms including ballet, modern, jazz, and diverse ethnic/folk dances. Through discussion, lecture demonstrations and especially through live and filmed dance performances, students will develop an ability to evaluate and appreciate the various types of dance as dynamic art forms. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-192 Introduction to Jazz Dance
2 Credits

This course introduces the students to the principles of jazz dance technique on a beginning level. Students will learn the foundations of jazz dance technique and understand the various world, as well as social dance influences on jazz dance. Course will trace jazz dance history from its African roots to Broadway show styles. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-193 Intermediate Jazz Dance I
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-192, Introduction to Jazz Dance, at a higher level of proficiency. A continuation of jazz dance technique from the Broadway show styles to the present day, it includes study of contemporary jazz technique with emphasis on rock, funky, lyric, and percussive movement. It is also a continued study of jazz dance history from the Broadway show styles to current jazz dance influences. Prerequisite: DANC-192. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-194 Introduction to Tap Dance
2 Credits
This course introduces students to the principles of tap dance technique on a beginning level. Students will learn the fundamental steps of tap dance. Includes basic one and two sound movements performed at the barre and simple rhythmic combinations in center. Course will trace tap dance history. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-195 Intermediate Tap Dance I
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-194, Introduction to Tap Dance, at a higher level of proficiency. A continuation of tap dance technique including complex rhythms, tempi, barre and center work. New movements include wings, pull-backs, multiple-sound steps and advanced turns. Course will continue tap dance history, style techniques, and choreographic approaches. Prerequisite: DANC-194. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-197 Pilates
1 Credit

Study and application of the Pilates Mat Program as a method of body conditioning, posing questions for anatomical self-evaluation based on applied instruction, lecture/discussion, required readings, and observation. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-197.

DANC-198 Alexander Technique
1 Credit

This course is an examination of the Alexander Technique as a method to investigate the issues of mind/body disciplines and alleviate excessive tension, and habitual holding patterns which produce inefficient use of the body. Principles of the Alexander Technique will be explored through anatomical self-evaluation based on applied instruction, lecture/discussion, required readings, and observation. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-198.

DANC-199 Intermediate Pilates
1 Credit
This course is designed to provide the student with the ability to perform Intermediate Mat Pilates exercises. The student will be able to perform a basic postural assessment and explain exercise modifications based on the assessment. This course will incorporate the use of Pilates Fitness circle and Stability ball to challenge exercise intensity. Prerequisite: DANC-197 or LFIT-197. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-199.

DANC-200 World Dance
1 Credit

World Dance develops knowledge, skills and appreciation of world dance forms through presentation of fundamental techniques, music and culture. Specific dances are analyzed for their cultural traditions, sacred/ceremonial import and/or theatrical impact within its society. With emphasis on movement, vocabulary, rhythms and styles of each dance form, the cultural, sociological, economic, and geographical perspectives are also covered. The area of concentration varies to include as many cultures as possible. One or more, up to four, will be chosen for a full semester of study. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-204 Intermediate Hip-Hop Dance
1 Credit

This course will serve as a continuation of material covered in Hip-hop Dance (DANC-104). Students will receive training on advanced hip-hop technique and jazz dance. Students will demonstrate these advanced hip-hop dance skills through warm-ups and choreographed routines. This class will also continue to explore the culture and music of hip-hop and other related styles of dance such as African dance and pop/culture dance. Prerequisite: DANC-104. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-205 Intermediate Belly Dancing
1 Credit

This course will enhance students’ previous knowledge in basic belly dance as demonstrated in DANC/LFIT-105 Belly Dancing. This course focuses on training students to hone their skills of isolation, incorporate props and more advanced belly dance techniques, and foster beginning students’ own choreography. Movement vocabulary will include isolations of head, shoulders, arms, hands, chest, belly, hips, and feet as well as techniques incorporating the entire body and traveling. Students are expected to cultivate an enriched understanding of an area of belly dance culture of their choice to further inform their exploration of this dance form. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of belly dance through choreographed and non-choreographed class performances. Prerequisite: DANC-105 or LFIT-105. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-205.

DANC-210 Dance Portfolio/Jury
1 Credit

Course is designed to prepare advanced dance majors for the portfolio review at transfer institutions. Must be taken during student’s last semester at Howard Community College. Dance majors will choreograph a solo work for auditions at 4-year institutions under the guidance of Dance Department faculty. Prerequisite: DANC‑101, DANC-102, DANC-206, DANC-281, and DANC-286. (1 hour weekly)

DANC-215 Musical Theatre Dance
2 Credits

This course will focus on training performers in the various dance styles used in Broadway and off-Broadway musicals. The students will demonstrate these dance skills by performing pieces of choreography created by well-known musical choreographers such as Susan Stroman, Gower Champion, Michael Bennett, George Faison, Agnes de Mille, Garth Fagan, Gillian Lynne, Jerry Mitchell, and Bob Fosse. The students will then apply this knowledge towards a final performance of several contrasting pieces. Prerequisite: DANC-160 or DANC-192, or higher. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-220 Intermediate Ballroom and Latin Dance
1 Credit

This course will serve as a continuation of the material covered in Ballroom and Latin Dance (DANC-110). This course will focus on training students to understand and perform complex ballroom and Latin steps, turns, and partnering. Students will also continue to learn the rhythms, history, and culture of each style. Students will demonstrate mastery of these styles through choreographed and non-choreographed class performances. Prerequisite: DANC-110. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-235 Foundations in Intermediate Dance Technique I
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide students who are registered for DANC-265 and/or DANC-275 with supplemental practice and theory in areas that are fundamental to the learning goals in those classes. Subject matter includes somatic literacy, experiential anatomy and kinesiology, rhythmic analysis, Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals, support modalities for dance, conditioning and wellness. This course is both teacher-directed and student-centered. Emphasis is placed on those areas which best address the particular needs of the students in the class, but all material above is covered. Corequisite: DANC- 265 and/or DANC- 275. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-236 Foundations in Intermediate Dance Technique II
1 Credit

This course is a continuation of DANC-235 and is designed to provide students who are registered for DANC-266 and/ or DANC-276 with continued supplemental practice and theory in areas that are fundamental to the learning goals in those classes. Subject matter includes somatic literacy, experiential anatomy and kinesiology, rhythmic analysis, Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals, support modalities for dance, conditioning and wellness. This course is both teacher-directed and student-centered. Emphasis is placed on those areas which best address the particular needs of the students in the class, but all material above is covered. Corequisite: DANC- 266 or DANC- 276. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-237 Foundations in Intermediate Dance Technique III
1 Credit

This course is a continuation of DANC-235 and is designed to provide students who are registered for DANC-266 and/or DANC-276 with continued supplemental practice and theory in areas that are fundamental to the learning goals in those classes. Subject matter includes somatic literacy, experiential anatomy and kinesiology, rhythmic analysis, Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals, support modalities for dance, conditioning and wellness. This course is both teacher-directed and student-centered. Emphasis is placed on those areas which best address the particular needs of the students in the class, but all material above is covered. Corequisite: DANC- 267 or DANC- 277. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-238 Foundations in Intermediate Dance Technique IV
1 Credit

This course is a continuation of DANC-235, DANC-236, and DANC-237 and is designed to provide students who are registered for DANC- 268 and/or DANC-278 with continued supplemental practice and theory in areas that are fundamental to the learning goals in those classes. Subject matter includes somatic literacy, experiential anatomy and kinesiology, rhythmic analysis, Laban Movement Analysis and Bartenieff Fundamentals, support modalities for dance, conditioning and wellness. This course is both teacher-directed and student-centered. Emphasis is placed on those areas which best address the particular needs of the students in the class, but all material above is covered. Corequisite: DANC- 268 or DANC- 278. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-250 Dance Composition
3 Credits

This course serves as an introduction to the creative process through improvisation, self-exploration, group interaction, relating musical tone and character to the development of thematic and abstract movement invention. Students explore compositional devices and develop small group works. Students will present group and solo choreography for a public performance. Prerequisite: DANC-150. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-265 High Intermediate Ballet Technique I
2 Credits

This course provides a reinforcement of the aesthetics of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the maintenance of a sound technical foundation as well as the development of performance quality. This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving anatomical awareness, and developing deeper understanding of the skills and principles of ballet technique. Students at this level must be competent at the intermediate level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences that approach a fuller level of synthesis and performance qualities. Prerequisite: DANC-165. (2 hours weekly)

DANC-266 High Intermediate Ballet Technique II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-265 and provides a continued reinforcement of the aesthetics of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the maintenance of a sound technical foundation as well as the development of performance quality. This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving anatomical awareness, and developing deeper understanding of the skills and principles of ballet technique. Students at this level must be competent at the intermediate level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences that approach a fuller level of synthesis and performance qualities. Prerequisite: DANC-265. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-267 High Intermediate Ballet Technique III
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-265 and DANC-266 and provides a continued reinforcement of the aesthetics of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the maintenance of a sound technical foundation as well as the development of performance quality. This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving anatomical awareness, and developing deeper understanding of the skills and principles of ballet technique. Students at this level must be competent at the intermediate level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences that approach a fuller level of synthesis and performance qualities. Prerequisite: DANC-266. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-268 High Intermediate Ballet Technique IV
2 Credits
This course is a continuation of DANC-265, DANC-266, and DANC-267 and provides a continued reinforcement of the aesthetics of classical ballet with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the maintenance of a sound technical foundation as well as the development of performance quality. This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving anatomical awareness, and developing deeper understanding of the skills and principles of ballet technique. Students at this level must be competent at the intermediate level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences that approach a fuller level of synthesis and performance qualities. Prerequisite: DANC-267. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-275 High Intermediate Modern Dance Technique I
2 Credits

This course provides a reinforcement of the aesthetics of modern dance with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the maintenance of a sound technical foundation as well as the development of performance quality. This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving anatomical awareness, and developing deeper understanding of the skills and principles of various modern dance techniques. Students at this level must be competent at the intermediate level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences that approach a fuller level of synthesis and performance qualities. Prerequisite: DANC-175. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-276 High Intermediate Modern Dance Technique II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-275 and provides a continued reinforcement of the aesthetics of modern dance with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the maintenance of a sound technical foundation as well as the development of performance quality. This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving anatomical awareness, and developing deeper understanding of the skills and principles of various modern dance techniques. Students at this level must be competent at the intermediate level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences that approach a fuller level of synthesis and performance qualities. Prerequisite: DANC-275. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-277 High Intermediate Modern Dance Technique III
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-275 and 276 and provides a continued reinforcement of the aesthetics of modern dance with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the maintenance of a sound technical foundation as well as the development of performance quality. This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving anatomical awareness, and developing deeper understanding of the skills and principles of various modern dance techniques. Students at this level must be competent at the intermediate level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences that approach a fuller level of synthesis and performance qualities. Prerequisite: DANC-276. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-278 High Intermediate Modern Dance Technique IV
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-275, DANC-276, and DANC-277 and provides a continued reinforcement of the aesthetics of modern dance with emphasis on placement and alignment of the body and other preparatory work necessary for the maintenance of a sound technical foundation as well as the development of performance quality. This course emphasizes increasing technical proficiency, improving anatomical awareness, and developing deeper understanding of the skills and principles of various modern dance techniques. Students at this level must be competent at the intermediate level and ready to perform longer and more complex movement sequences that approach a fuller level of synthesis and performance qualities. Prerequisite: DANC-277. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-280 Dance Education for Early Childhood
3 Credits

This course provides students who plan to teach dance to young children the opportunity to learn the fundamentals of movement essential to early childhood dance education in the public and private studio setting. This course will give beginning teachers an understanding of how to enhance the aesthetic, kinesthetic, and artistic experiences of a child through dance education, as well as the tools to teach creative movement, pre-ballet and other forms of dance to young children. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-281 Ballet III
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-182, Ballet II, at a higher level of proficiency. A continued study of classical ballet technique with emphasis on the progression of technical complexities, contemporary ballet stylization and musicality. Basics of pointe work and partnering technique for total comprehension to the performance of classical ballet. Prerequisite: DANC‑182. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-282 Ballet IV
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-281, Ballet III, at a higher level of proficiency. A continued study of classical ballet technique with emphasis on the progression of technical complexities, contemporary ballet stylization and musicality. Continuation of pointe work and partnering technique for total comprehension to the performance of classical ballet. Prerequisite: DANC‑281. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-286 Modern Dance III
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-187, Modern Dance II, at a higher level of proficiency. A continued study of modern dance technique on an intermediate level with emphasis on expanded movement vocabulary involving sequences of greater complexity– kinesthetically, spatially and musically. Course work continues study of various modern dance theories, history and improvisation. Prerequisite: DANC-187. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-287 Modern Dance IV
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-286, Modern Dance III, at a higher level of proficiency. A continued study of modern dance technique on an intermediate/advanced level with emphasis on expanded movement vocabulary involving sequences of greater complexity kinesthetically, spatially and musically. Focus on interpretation and performances. Prerequisite: DANC-286. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-292 Intermediate Jazz
Dance II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of DANC-193, Intermediate Jazz Dance I, at a higher level of proficiency. A continuation of jazz dance technique with emphasis on performance of styles used on the concert stage, television and motion pictures. Expanded movement vocabulary involving sequences of greater complexity. Course will introduce choreographic explorations of jazz dance for the concert stage. Prerequisite: DANC-193. (3 hours weekly)

DANC-298 Intermediate Alexander Technique
1 Credit

This course follows DANC-198 (The Alexander Technique) and continues the study and practice of Alexander’s work with the Self as a mind/body unity. Recognizing the spiral nature of this type of learning, whereby we revisit the same activities and principles but at a deeper level, this course contains the same daily activities as the first course such as sitting, standing, walking, breathing and constructive rest. There is emphasis on the particular performance or everyday activity of most interest to the student, whether that be in music, dance, drama, athletics, public speaking, computer work or anything involving complex co-ordination. Prerequisite: DANC-198 or LFIT-198. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-298.


DENTAL HYGIENE

DHYG-100 Pre-Dental Hygiene Theory and Clinic I
4 Credits

Through lecture and laboratory experience students will become knowledgeable and develop proficiency in basic principles of infection control, instrumentation, patient motivation, and assessment techniques. Clinic will correlate knowledge from the didactic portion of the course to conducting oral health services on typodonts and/or student partners under direct supervision. Skills will be practiced to competency. Prerequisites: Admittance into the dental hygiene program and ENGL-121, CHEM-103, and BIOL-107. Corequisites: DHYG-102, DHYG-104, DHYG-106 and DHYG-111. (2.5 hours theory, 6 hours clinical weekly)

DHYG-102 Histology and Embryology
2 Credits

This course will provide the basic knowledge and skills needed to apply elements of histology and embryology to the practice of dental hygiene. The development of the face, teeth, oral cavities, and nasal cavities will be introduced. Prerequisites: Admission into the Dental Hygiene program and ENGL-121, CHEM-103, and BIOL-107. Corequisites: DHYG-104, DHYG-106, DHYG-100, and DHYG-111. (2 hours weekly)

DHYG-104 General and Oral Pathology
3 Credits

This course will discuss general pathology with a special emphasis on oral pathology. Using radiographs and slides of pertinent structures, dental hygiene students will learn to recognize and identify abnormal conditions of the mouth and teeth. Emphasis will be placed on the intra and extra oral clinical examination of patients. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and ENGL-121, CHEM-103, and BIOL-107. Corequisites: DHYG-100, DHYG-102, DHYG-106, and DHYG-111. (3 hours weekly)

DHYG-106 Oral Anatomy and Tooth Morphology
3 Credits

This course examines the development of the head and neck as it applies to the practice of dental hygiene. Emphasis will be placed on the surface and underlying structures of the head and neck, concentrating on the muscles, nerves, blood supply, lymphatic drainage, cranial, and facial bones and their relationship to the teeth. Dental hygiene students will focus on the maxilla and the mandible. Also included will be the structure, morphology, eruption, and functions of the primary and permanent dentitions. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and ENGL-121, CHEM-103, and BIOL-107. Corequisites: DHYG-102, DHYG-104, DHYG-100, and DHYG-111. (2.25 theory, 3 hours lab weekly)

DHYG-111 Dental Radiology
3 Credits

This course will introduce radiation protection and the use of standard, panoramic, and computerized digital radiographic equipment. Students will master the technique of radiographic image exposure, processing, mounting, and identification of standard, panoramic, and computerized radiographs and intraoral images; critiquing of oral radiographic images and identification of normal and abnormal anatomy and artifacts; and interpretation of radiographic and pictorial pathology of the hard and soft structures of the oral cavity with the use of radiographs. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and ENGL-121, CHEM-103, and BIOL-107. Corequisites: DHYG-100, DHYG-102, DHYG-104, and DHYG-106. (2.25 hours theory, 3 hours lab weekly)

DHYG-150 Dental Hygiene Theory and Clinic II
5 Credits
This course emphasizes advanced instrumentation technique and supportive dental hygiene therapy. Students will enhance and refine instrumentation techniques to a competent level. This course will provide instruction on the removal of hard and soft deposits, patient assessment, treatment planning, and dental hygiene diagnosis. Students will be treating patients under general supervision. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and DHYG-100, DHYG-102, DHYG-104, DHYG-106, and DHYG-111. Corequisites: DHYG-208, DHYG-209, BIOL-106, and NUTR-211. (3 hours theory, 8 hours clinical weekly)

DHYG-200 Dental Hygiene Theory and Clinic III
5 Credits

Students will expand on principles and clinical skills of dental hygiene practice. Students will use research, discussions, and professional judgment to provide comprehensive dental hygiene treatment plans. Topics will include root planning, sub-gingival irrigation, ultrasonic use, case presentations, nutritional counseling, and treatment of the special needs patient. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and DHYG-150, DHYG-208, DHYG-209, NUTR-211, and BIOL-106. Corequisites: DHYG-207, DHYG-210, SOCI-101, and SPCH-105. (2 hours theory, 12 hours clinical weekly)

DHYG-207 Dental Public Health
3 Credits

This course introduces the principles of public health in relation to dental hygienist roles in providing health care to the community. Emphasis is placed on prevention of dental disease in the public health setting. An overview of the history and philosophy of public health practice and administration is discussed. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and DHYG-150, DHYG-208, DHYG-209, NUTR-211, and BIOL-106. Corequisites: DHYG-200, DHYG-210, SOCI-101, and SPCH-105. (3 hours weekly)

DHYG-208 Dental Materials
3 Credits

This course will discuss the purpose and use of dental materials used in dentistry. Topics will include the physical, chemical, biological, and mechanical properties of dental materials. Discussed will be resins, bases, amalgam, cements, impression materials, and pit and fissure sealants. Students will learn the principles and application of expanded duties for the registered dental hygienist. Prerequisites: Admittance into Dental Hygiene program and DHYG-100, DHYG-102, DHYG-104, DHYG-106, and DHYG-111. Corequisites: DHYG-150, DHYG-209, BIOL-106, and NUTR-211. (2 hours theory, 4 hours lab weekly)

DHYG-209 Periodontics
2 Credits

This course will examine the histological and clinical characteristics of healthy and diseased periodontium. Topics will include a discussion of the histological inflammation process and host response as related to periodontal disease. Also included will be the periodontal exam, prognosis, treatment planning, periodontal instrumentation (scaling and root planning), and surgery. Emphasis will be on the prevention and disease control process through the use of oral home care products. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and DHYG-100, DHYG-102, DHYG-104, DHYG-106, and DHYG-111. Corequisites: DHYG-150, DHYG-208, NUTR-211, and BIOL-106. (2 hours weekly)

DHYG-210 Pharmacology and Pain Management
2 Credits

This course will discuss the impact of pharmaceutical drugs as related to the clinical practice of dental hygiene. Students will learn the therapeutic uses, adverse effects, and impact of pharmaceutical drugs. Topics will include absorption, distribution, metabolism, interactions, and drug action in the body. Anesthetics and pain management will be reviewed. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and DHYG-150, DHYG-208, DHYG-209, NUTR-211, and BIOL-106. Corequisites: DHYG-200, DHYG-207, SOCI-101, and SPCH-105. (2 hours theory weekly)

DHYG-250 Dental Hygiene Theory and Clinic IV
5 Credits

Students will utilize experience and opportunities to practice entry-level dental hygiene. Students will perfect clinical skills and prepare for National Board Examination. This course will focus on the transition to dental hygiene practice beyond graduation. Topics will include time management, job interview techniques, resume writing, dental office procedures and management, professionalism, and professional organizations. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and DHYG-200, DHYG-207, DHYG-210, SOCI-101, and SPCH-105. Corequisites: DHYG-257, MATH-138, and PSYC-101. (2 hours theory, 12 hours clinical weekly)

DHYG-257 Dental Hygiene Ethics and Jurisprudence
1 Credit
This course will discuss basic ethical principles, ethical problem-solving methods, and the ethics of the American Dental Hygienist Association. Prerequisites: Admittance into the Dental Hygiene program and DHYG-200, DHYG-207, DHYG-210, SOCI-101, and SPCH-105. Corequisites: DHYG-250, MATH-138, and PSYC-101. (1 hour weekly)


DIAGNOSTIC MEDICAL SONOGRAPHY

DMSU-101 Patient Care for Imaging Professionals
1 Credit

This course presents the concepts of physical and psychological patient care, as well as routine and emergency patient care procedures, including first aid. This course also discusses the abnormalities commonly seen and diagnosed with medical imaging, as well as the professional scope of practice and hospital regulatory standards and guidelines. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about record keeping and paperwork pertinent to the clinical setting. (0.5 hour theory, 2 hours on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-102 Introduction to Ultrasound
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the theoretical, clinical, and ethical aspects of ultrasound. The student will have the opportunity to familiarize themselves with ultrasound-related topics including: history, physics, cross-sectional anatomy, elementary scan interpretation, and sonographic terms. The student will be introduced to the laboratory and the various ultrasound machines. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL-121, MATH-141, BIOL-204, PHYS-101, and DMSU-101. (2.5 hours theory, 2 hours on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-112 Sectional Anatomy for Imaging Professionals
3 Credits

This course is the study of cross-sectional normal and abnormal anatomy known as pathology. The course will demonstrate and educate the student on the correlation of the study of cross-sectional anatomy. Students will explore in-depth study of human anatomy in sagittal, coronal, transverse, and orthogonal sections essential to current techniques in diagnostic imaging. Prerequisites: ENGL-121, MATH-141, BIOL-204, PHYS-101, and DMSU-101. Corequisites: DMSU-102 and DMSU-151. (3 hours weekly)

DMSU-151 Clinical Sonography I
2 Credits
This course is the student’s first clinical education rotation. The student will be trained in the day-to-day operations of an ultrasound lab. The student will have the opportunity to observe experienced technologists and develop scanning skills in the clinical setting. Attendance at an assigned clinical affiliate for 8 hours per week is required. Prerequisites: ENGL-121, MATH-141, BIOL-204, PHYS-101, and DMSU-101. Corequisites: DMSU-102 and DMSU-112. (8 hours clinical weekly)

DMSU-171 Abdominal and Small Parts Ultrasound I
3 Credits

This course will review basic human anatomy and physiology of the aorta, portal system, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, gastrointestinal system, spleen, adrenals, and kidneys/bladder with emphasis on sonographic appearance of abdominal and pelvic viscera in accepted scan planes. The anatomy and sonographic appearance of a first, second, and third trimester fetus are also important aspects of this course. Proper scan techniques and protocols for the aorta and liver, and introduction to the gallbladder are presented during the laboratory component of this course. Related diagnostic and laboratory testing, patient history, sonographic appearance, and congenital anomalies are also covered. Pathology of the gastrointestinal system and spleen is introduced. This course is required to complete the general concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisites: ENGL-121, MATH-141, BIOL-204, PHYS-101, and DMSU-101. Corequisites: DMSU-102, DMSU-112, DMSU-172, and DMSU-151. (2.5 hours of theory, 2 hours of on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-172 Obstetrics/Gynecology Ultrasound I
3 Credits

This course will present the anatomy, physiology, and congenital anomalies of the female pelvis. Obstetrical embryology and fertilization and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester fetal anatomy is also covered. Fetal biometry and routine ultrasound evaluation of the fetus is covered as well. The student is expected to have an understanding of fetal and placental circulation. Lectures include the importance of patient history, laboratory, and other clinical information. Sonographic evaluation of the normal female reproductive structures and all three trimesters of pregnancy are also covered. This course is required to complete the general concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisite: ENGL-121, MATH-141, BIOL-204, PHYS-101, and DMSU-101. Corequisite: DMSU-102, DMSU-112, DMSU-171, and DMSU-151. (2.5 hours of theory, 2 hours on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-181 Vascular Ultrasound I
3 Credits

This course focuses on the carotid, peripheral, vascular, arterial, and venous Doppler ultrasound exams. The principles of the vascular physical examination, proper instrumentation for each type of ultrasound, as well as anatomy, hemodynamics, patient history, clinical manifestations, non-invasive techniques, and interpretation will be discussed. The students will have the opportunity to reinforce the theory taught in lecture with hands-on scanning in the lab component to this class. This course is required to complete the vascular concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisites: ENGL-121, MATH-141, BIOL-204, PHYS-101, and DMSU-101. Corequisites: DMSU-102, DMSU-112, CARD-122, and DMSU-151. (2.5 hours of theory, 2 hours of on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-191 Adult Echocardiography I
3 Credits

In this course, students will focus on normal anatomy, scan techniques, cardiac measurement, new dynamics, and case-study presentations. This course includes the cardiovascular assessment techniques (TTE & TEE), physics and ultrasound review, and an introduction to the theoretical and practical principles of basic M-mode exam, and two-dimensional echocardiography examination of the adult heart. This course is required to complete the cardiac concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisite: ENGL-121, MATH-141, BIOL-204, PHYS-101, and DMSU-101. Corequisite: DMSU-102, DMSU-112, CARD-122, and DMSU-151. (2.5 hours of theory, 2 hours of on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-211 Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation I
3 Credits

This course explains how the pulse-echo principle is used in sonography. Basic sound and ultrasound physics are covered, including frequency, wavelength, propagation speed, reflection, and resolution. The components and function of the ultrasound transducer and equipment are explored. Prerequisites: PHYS-101, DMSU-102, DMSU-112, and DMSU-151. Corequisites: DMSU-213 and DMSU-252. (2.5 hours theory, 2 hours on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-212 Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation II
3 Credits

In this course, lectures and related exercises cover the areas of ultrasonic propagation principles, imaging artifacts, and spectral and color-flow Doppler. Content will also include the interactive properties of ultrasound with human tissue, possible biologic effects, types of equipment and instrumentation, and safety and quality control. Prerequisites: DMSU-211, DMSU-213, and DMSU-252. Corequisite: DMSU-253. (2.5 hours of theory, 2 hours of on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-213 Pathophysiology for Imaging Professionals
3 Credits
This course will examine the phenomena that produce alterations in the human physiologic function and the resulting human response. Upon completion of the course, students will understand pathophysiological changes, including how pathological processes are manifested, progress in the body, and primary and secondary effects. Students must have an understanding of normal functions of the body systems in order to understand the abnormal functions and manifestations of the disease process. Prerequisites: DMSU-102, DMSU-112, and DMSU-151. Corequisites: DMSU-211 and DMSU-252. (3 hours weekly)

DMSU-252 Clinical Sonography II
2 Credits

This course provides an observation the clinical duties performed in the ultrasound department, as well as basic instruction and scanning experience in abdominal, obstetrical, gynecological, small parts, vascular, echocardiography, and/or other aspects of sonography. Attendance at an assigned clinical affiliate is required. Prerequisites: DMSU-102, DMSU-112, and DMSU-151. Corequisites: DMSU-211 and DMSU-213. (16 hours clinical weekly)

DMSU-253 Clinical Sonography III
4 Credits

This course provides continued observation of all clinical duties performed in the ultrasound department, as well as basic instruction and scanning experience in abdominal, obstetrical, gynecological, small parts, vascular, echocardiographic, and/or other aspects of sonography. Attendance at an assigned clinical affiliate for 16 hours per week is required. Prerequisites: DMSU-211, DMSU-213, and DMSU-252. Corequisite: DMSU-212. (16 hours clinical weekly)

DMSU-254 Clinical Sonography IV
1 Credit

This course is a continuation of practical clinical experience in all aspects of abdominal, OB-GYN, vascular, and/or cardiac sonography. Students are encouraged to present cases to the interpreting physician. Attendance at an assigned clinical affiliate for 16 hours per week during the winter intersession period is required. Prerequisite: DMSU-212 and DMSU-253. (16 hours clinical weekly)

DMSU-255 Clinical Sonography V
6 Credits

This course is a continuation of practical clinical experience in all aspects of ultrasonography. The student is encouraged to scan more challenging examinations and to fully participate in the clinical setting as a sonographer. The student is required to complete assigned competencies before completion of clinical education. Attendance at an assigned clinical affiliate for 24 hours per week is required. Prerequisite: DMSU-254. Corequisites: DMSU-261 and DMSU-262. (24 hours clinical weekly)

DMSU-261 ARDMS Registry Seminar
1 Credit
This course provides a review of the didactic knowledge and clinical skills necessary to prepare students for the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS) exam and for successful employment opportunities in diagnostic medical sonography. Prerequisite: DMSU-254. Corequisites: DMSU-262 and DMSU-255. (1 hour weekly)

DMSU-262 Ultrasound Case Review
1 Credit

This course focuses on the preparation and the presentation of the ultrasound case studies with abnormal findings. Discussions of clinical symptoms, patient history, disease process, and technical pitfalls will be included. An emphasis is placed on the importance of patient confidentiality. Prerequisite: DMSU-254. Corequisites: DMSU-255 and DMSU-261. (1 hour weekly)

DMSU-271 Abdominal and Small Parts Ultrasound II
2 Credits

This course focuses on how pathology and disease affect the abdominal and superficial organs: abdominal aorta, liver, gallbladder, pancreas, adrenal, renal/bladder, pelvic viscera, thyroid, parathyroid, breast, scrotum, and prostate. Course content will also include the importance of laboratory values, patient history, sonographic appearance, and prior test results. Ultrasound images and case studies with abnormal findings will be presented. This course is required to complete the general concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisites: DMSU-171, DMSU-211, DMSU-213, and DMSU-252. Corequisites: DMSU-212, DMSU-253, and DMSU-272. (2 hours weekly)

DMSU-272 Obstetrics/Gynecology Ultrasound II
2 Credits

This course focuses on fetal anomalies including cranial, facial, spinal, thoracic, skeletal, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, chromosomal, and cardiac. First trimester and maternal complications, multiple gestations, and fetal testing are also covered. Images and case studies with abnormal findings will be presented. This course is required to complete the general concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisites: DMSU-172, DMSU-211, DMSU-213, and DMSU-252. Corequisites: DMSU-212, DMSU-253, and DMSU-271. (2 hours weekly)

DMSU-280 Introduction to Vascular Ultrasound
3 Credits

This course is a condensed version of DMSU-181 and DMSU-282, which includes lectures on carotid and peripheral vascular, arterial, and venous Doppler, as well as vascular physical principles and instrumentation. Anatomy, hemodynamics, patient history, clinical manifestations, non-invasive techniques, interpretation, and pathophysiology will be discussed. The students will have the opportunity to reinforce the theory taught in lecture with hands-on scanning in the lab component to this class. This course is required to complete the general or cardiac concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisite: DMSU-254. Corequisites: DMSU-255, DMSU-261, and DMSU-262. (2.5 hours of theory, 2 hours of on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-282 Vascular Ultrasound II
3 Credits

This course will focus on carotid and peripheral vascular, arterial, and venous Doppler. Pathology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, non-invasive techniques, and interpretation will be discussed. The students will have the opportunity to reinforce the theory taught in lecture with hands-on scanning in the lab component to this class. This course is required to complete the vascular concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisites: DMSU-181, DMSU-211, DMSU-213, and DMSU-252. Corequisites: DMSU-212 and DMSU-253. (2.5 hours of theory, 2 hours of on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-290 Introduction to Cardiac Ultrasound
3 Credits

This course is a condensed version of DMSU-191 and DMSU-292. In this course, students will focus on normal anatomy, scan techniques, cardiac measurement, and new dynamics and case-study presentations. This course includes cardiovascular assessment techniques (TTE & TEE), physics and ultrasound review, and an introduction to the theoretical and practical principles of basic M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiography examination of the adult heart. The students will also learn briefly about left and right systolic functions, ventricular diastolic filling functions, ischemic heart diseases, cardio-myopathies, hypertensive and pulmonary heart disease, pericardial diseases, valvular stenosis, valvular regurgitation, the prosthetic valves, endocarditis, cardiac masses and the potential cardiac source of embolus, diseases of great vessels, and adult and congenital heart diseases. Students will also practice Doppler measurements and calculations to assess the cardiac functions – EF, Qp/Qs, MVA, AVA by PISA method, DT, IVRT, left ventricular diastolic functions, pulmonary vein flow, and hepatic vein flow. This course is required to complete the vascular concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisite: DMSU-254. Corequisites: DMSU-255, DMSU-261, and DMSU-262. (2.5 hours of theory, 2 hours of on-campus lab weekly)

DMSU-292 Adult Echocardiography II
3 Credits

This course will focus on the left and right systolic functions, ventricular diastolic filling functions, ischemic heart diseases, cardio-myopathies, hypertensive and pulmonary heart disease, pericardial diseases, valvular stenosis, valvular regurgitation, the prosthetic valves, endocarditis, cardiac masses and the potential cardiac source of embolus, diseases of great vessels, and adult and congenital heart diseases. Students will also practice doppler measurements and calculations to assess the cardiac functions – EF, Qp/Qs, MVA, AVA by PISA method, DT, IVRT, left ventricular diastolic functions, pulmonary vein flow, and hepatic vein flow. This course is required to complete the cardiac concentration of the Diagnostic Medical Sonography program. Prerequisites: DMSU-191, DMSU-211, DMSU-213, and DMSU-252. Corequisites: DMSU-212 and DMSU-253. (2.5 hours theory, 2 hours on-campus lab weekly)


ECONOMIC

ECON-101 Principles of Economics (Macro)
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)
This course introduces students to important economic issues which affect an entire economy. Students will more comfortably read and understand books, newspapers, and magazines with economic content. Topics include demand and supply theory; gross domestic product determination; inflation; unemployment; the role of the government and public choice; fiscal and monetary policy and foreign exchange rates and trade. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ECON-102 Principles of Economics (Micro)
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)
Micro economics introduces students to economic decision making at the individual firm, consumer and industry level. Topics include demand and supply theory; elasticity; cost and production functions; profit maximization analysis; government regulation and anti-trust; and international trade. It is not necessary to take ECON-101 previous to ECON-102. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ECON-201 Money and Banking
3 Credits

Money and Banking provides an analysis of our monetary and banking systems and their relationships to the United States Economy. Topics include the origin and nature of money, the development and functions of commercial banking and other financial industries, the Federal Reserve System, and the relationship between fiscal and monetary policies in our economy. Prerequisite: ECON-101. (3 hours weekly)

ECON-205 International Economics
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

International Economics provides the student with the foundations of the theory and practice of international trade and finance necessary for understanding the nature and consequences of linking the domestic economy and the world. Topics covered include: introduction to classical and modern international theories of trade; analysis of the economic effects of commercial policies like tariffs and quotas; economics of custom unions; balance of payments, spot and forward foreign exchange markets and exchange rate systems; balance of payments problems and the adjustment mechanisms; flexible and fixed exchange rate systems; and international monetary systems. Prerequisite: ECON-101. (3 hours weekly)


EDUCATION

EDUC-101 Praxis I Review Course – Reading/Writing Tests
1 Credit

This course is designed to help students prepare for the Praxis I Reading/Writing Test. Passing scores on a basic skills test (Praxis I, SAT, ACT, GRE) are required for: 1) an AAT degree, 2) admission to a four-year Teacher Education program, and 3) teacher certification in Maryland and most other states. Students must pass the Praxis I exam if they have not received passing scores on another basic skills test. Students majoring in the Teacher Education transfer programs are required to submit scores from Praxis I or other approved basic skills tests to the Social Sciences Division Office prior to the completion of the 30th credit hour. Credit count certification individuals, conditional teachers, and teacher education majors could benefit from this course. (Campus Web course)

EDUC-102 Praxis I Review Course – Math Test
1 Credit

This course is designed to help students prepare for the Praxis I Math Test. Passing scores on a basic skills test (Praxis I, SAT, ACT, GRE) are required for: 1) an AAT degree, 2) admission to a four-year Teacher Education program, and 3) teacher certification in Maryland and most other states. Students must pass the Praxis I exam if they have not received passing scores on another basic skills test. Students majoring in the Teacher Education transfer programs are required to submit scores from Praxis I or other approved basic skills tests to the Social Sciences Division Office prior to the completion of the 30th credit hour. Credit count certification individuals, conditional teachers, and teacher education majors could benefit from this course. (Campus Web course)

EDUC-110 Introduction to Education
3 Credits
The student will examine the basic principles and philosophical traditions of Western and American Education. The student will also evaluate the trends, issues and career opportunities and options in contemporary education. A 15-hour Field Experience outside of class time is required. Students are placed in a Howard County Public School or may use a K-12 school where they are employed. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-111 Child Growth and Development
3 Credits

Through the study of the early childhood and elementary years, the student will be able to describe the language, cognitive, physical, social, and emotional development of young children, birth to 12 years. Instruction will focus on theories of child development, research methods, and developmental milestones. Knowledge learned in this course can be applied to parenting and to careers in early childhood and elementary education. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Child Development requirement for an initial certificate in Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education. This course meets the MSDE Human Growth and Development requirement for Generic Special Education Infant/Primary, and Generic Special Education Elementary/ Middle. This course fulfills Part 1 (of 2 Parts) of the Child Care Certificate required for Child Care Teacher–Preschool. EDUC-112 is required to complete the Child Care Certificate. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-112 Methods and Materials in Early Childhood Education
3 Credits

This course is designed to teach the methods and proper use of materials for presenting creative learning experiences to young children in the areas of art, music, creative dramatics, language, movement, cooking, math and science. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Teaching Methodology requirement for an initial certificate in Early Childhood Education. This course fulfills Part 2 (of 2 Parts) of the Child Care Certificate required for Child Care Teacher–Preschool. EDUC-111 is required to complete the Child Care Certificate. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-113 Working with Infants and Toddlers
3 Credits

This course introduces the philosophy and implementation of infant and toddler caregiving in a group setting. This RIE (Magda Gerber) influenced course reviews care routines, appropriate activities, and group management techniques. The health, safety and nutritional needs of infants and toddlers are also examined. Upon completion of this course and EDUC-111, the student meets the coursework requirements for the position of Infant/Toddler Child Care Teacher in a child care center. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-130 Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3 Credits

This course is designed to increase the student’s understanding of various curriculum models and approaches in Early Childhood Education. Techniques for implementing and evaluating these models and approaches will be presented through lectures, videos, classroom activities, classroom visits, field placements and guest speakers. Furthermore, the student will explore some contemporary issues and problems affecting young children and learning, such as stress, sexism, homelessness, abuse, neglect and poverty. Students are required to complete 15 hours of Field Experience outside of class time. Students are placed in a Howard County Public School or may use a K-3 school where they are currently employed. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-140 Child Health, Safety and Nutrition
3 Credits

This course will examine the health, safety, and nutritional needs of children, ages 2 - 5 years, in the child care setting. Attention will be directed to the study of common childhood illnesses, chronic conditions, prevention through personal hygiene, good safety practices, and nutritious snacks and meals as they impact on the child care setting. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-150 Practicum in Early Childhood Development
4 Credits

This course is designed to teach the student how to implement and evaluate a quality child care program. Students are assigned to one child care setting where they will spend 9 hours per week. Students meet at the college every other week for 2 hours to discuss lecture topics and classroom experiences. Prerequisites: EDUC-111, EDUC-112. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

EDUC-160 School Age Child Care
3 Credits

This course introduces the philosophy of elementary education with basic child development theory focusing how children grow physically, emotionally, socially, and cognitively, ages 5-12 years. Approaches in curriculum, planning, goal setting, and selection of age-appropriate materials and methods by which education objectives are obtained are stressed. Students learn how to plan an appropriate program for school age child care. This course meets the coursework requirements for the position of Child Care Teacher–School Age in a school age program. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-190 Field Experience: Introduction to Education
1 Credit

This is a field-based course that provides the opportunity to apply the theories and methods learned regarding best practices for creating and maintaining a positive and productive learning environment. Students will analyze a variety of learner characteristics that influence student development and academic achievement as is appropriate for age/grade level and professional specialization. Prerequisite: This course is only available to those students who have successfully completed the equivalent of Introduction to Education at another higher education institution but who have not completed 15 hours of field experience as part of that course.

EDUC-191 Field Experience: Introduction to Early Childhood Education
1 Credit

This is a field-based course that provides the opportunity to explore the theories and methods learned regarding the various curriculum models and approaches in Early Childhood education. Students will analyze some contemporary issues and problems affecting young children and learning. Prerequisite: This course is only available to those students who have successfully completed the equivalent of Introduction to Early Childhood Education at another higher education institution but who have not completed 15 hours of field experience as part of that course.

EDUC-200 Introduction to Special Education
3 Credits

This course prepares students to identify disabilities and their medical, psychological, and educational impact on students, parents, and teachers. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Inclusion of Special Needs Student Populations requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education and Secondary Education. This course also meets the MSDE Historical, Philosophical, and Legal Foundations of Special Education requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Generic Special Education Infant/Primary, Generic Special Education Elementary/Middle, and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. A 15-hour Field Experience outside of class time is required. Students are placed in a Howard County Public School or may use a K-12 school where they are employed. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-201 Processes and Acquisition of Reading
3 Credits
This course develops an understanding of the reading acquisition process through analysis of reading and written language development, and the study of current issues in reading research. It is organized around current scientific, research-based theoretical models that account for individual differences in reading. Introduction to language structures including spoken syllables, phonemes, graphemes, and morphemes is included in this course. Participants will apply knowledge of the core areas of language to reading acquisition in terms of first and second language acquisition, typical development and exceptionalities. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Reading requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of a certificate in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Special Education Generic Infant/Primary, and Special Education Generic Elementary/Middle. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-202 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Areas, Part I for Regular and Special Education Teachers
3 Credits

Designed specifically for individuals seeking secondary certification, this course outlines the essentials of the reading processes necessary for secondary students to become proficient learners of content. Types of reading, elements of assessment, skills of the reading process, the incorporation of reading instruction into content delivery and the affective aspects of the processes of reading will be examined. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Reading requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Secondary Education and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-203 Instruction of Reading
3 Credits

This course is designed to give the classroom teacher the ability to use a representative array of research-based instructional techniques and strategies in the area of reading. Instructional routines and strategies in the five major components of reading instruction (phonological and phonemic awareness; phonics, spelling and word study; fluency development; vocabulary; and comprehension) suitable for various age and ability groups are emphasized. Throughout the course, students will demonstrate their skill with the instructional routines and strategies by role-play, live demonstrations, critiquing good and inadequate models, and reviewing the research support available for those approaches. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Reading requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Special Education Generic Infant/Primary, and Special Education Generic Elementary/Middle. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-204 Assessment for Reading Instruction
3 Credits

Students will demonstrate an understanding of how to use data from state, local, and classroom assessments of reading/language arts to make ongoing instructional modifications in their classrooms as a strategy for instruction and intervention. They will demonstrate an understanding of how to implement a variety of reading assessments and adjust the curriculum accordingly. They will demonstrate knowledge of how to provide meaningful input to Admission, Review, and Dismissal (ARD) and Instructional Intervention Team (IIT) procedures. In additional they will be able to communicate assessment data about individual student reading performances to parents. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Reading requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of a certificate in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Special Education Generic Infant/Primary, and Special Education Generic Elementary/Middle. Prerequisite: EDUC-201. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-205 Materials for Reading
3 Credits

Students will use criteria consistent with findings of scientific research to select, evaluate, and compare instructional programs and materials for teaching reading. Participants will become proficient in enabling students to become strategic, fluent, and independent readers using a variety of texts and other materials. They will be prepared to involve parents and members of the school and surrounding community to promote reading both inside and outside of school. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Reading requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, Special Education Generic Infant/Primary, and Special Education Generic Elementary/Middle. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-206 Methods of Teaching Reading in the Secondary Content Areas, Part II for Regular and Special Education Teachers
3 Credits

Designed specifically for individuals seeking secondary certification, this course builds upon the foundational theories and knowledge of reading from the prerequisite course Methods of Teaching Reading in the Content Area, Part I. Participants will take theory into practice as they become familiar with and demonstrate best practices of how to integrate the teaching of reading of content area material with content-specific knowledge. Topics covered in this course will include using assessment to know the learner, putting metacognitive theory into practice, and differentiating instruction for all students. Participants will leave the course with multiple hands-on strategies they can immediately use to make content reading accessible and successful for their students. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Reading requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Secondary Education and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. Prerequisite: EDUC-202. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-212 Advanced Methods and Materials in Early Childhood Education
3 Credits

This course is designed to expand and integrate the methods and materials presented in EDUC-112 with program planning for young children. The course will emphasize collecting and preparing a variety of activities and materials using a thematic approach to planning. The course will present a variety of issues relevant to curriculum planning in an early childhood program. Prerequisites: EDUC-111 and EDUC-112. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-230 Child Care Center Administration and Management
3 Credits
This course is the study of practical application of management procedures for early care and education programs including the role of the administration, planning, operating, supervising, and evaluating programs. Special focus is on philosophy, types of programs, policies, fiscal management, regulations, staff selection, training and management, food service, equipment, materials and parent and community involvement. Prerequisites: EDUC-111 and EDUC-112. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-240 Successful Classroom Management
3 Credits

This course is designed to teach how to effectively manage a classroom for two through five year old children. The student will learn respectful ways to interact with young children during various scenarios. The student will be able to set up the physical environment, plan the schedule, incorporate age-appropriate program planning, and learn strategies for working with parents and other staff members in a child care setting. Specific behavior management techniques will be explored as they relate to dealing with children in a classroom setting. Prerequisites: EDUC-111 and EDUC-112. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-250 Advanced Practicum in Early Childhood Development
4 Credits
This course is designed to teach the student how to implement and evaluate a quality child care program. Students are assigned to one child care setting where they will spend 9 hours per week. Students meet at the college every other week for two hours to discuss lecture topics and classroom observations and assignments. Prerequisites: EDUC-111, EDUC-112, and EDUC-150. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

EDUC-260 Educational Psychology
3 Credits

Educational Psychology is an advanced course which surveys current psychological research and theory to address issues of teaching and learning. Instruction will focus on developmental theories, research methods, class­room management, and instructional techniques. The course will utilize readings, lectures, guest speakers, and small group projects, and is well suited for anyone interested in learning more about children, schools, learning, and/or teaching. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Human Learning requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education and Secondary Education. A 15-hour Field Experience outside of class time is required. Students are placed in a Howard County Public School or may use a K-12 school where they are employed. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-265 Educational Assessment
3 Credits

Participants will explore the world of measurement, evaluation, and student performance as it aligns with instruction and curriculum. Participants will examine the role that validity, reliability, test bias, and item construction play in ensuring a good and meaningful assessment instrument, and will become familiar with the concept of a formal testing program, which encompasses state and local mandated assessments. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Assessment of Students requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, and Secondary Education. This course also meets the MSDE Assessment, Diagnosis, and Prescriptive Techniques requirement for an initial certificate renewal of certificate in Generic Special Education Infant/Primary, Generic Special Education Elementary/Middle, and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-266 Methods of Teaching Early Childhood and Elementary Education
3 Credits

This class prepares prospective and non-certified early childhood and ele­mentary school teachers to become reflective teachers in a diverse society through knowledge of the subject matter, the curriculum, the learners, and teaching strategies. Opportunities will be provided for planning and practicing instruction based on a knowledge of the theory and research supporting the strategies and models used. Emphasis will be placed upon reflection on teaching and learning events in classrooms and schools to encourage problem solving in collaboration with others. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Teaching Methodology requirement for an initial certificate in Early Childhood Education or Elementary Education. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-267 Methods of Teaching Secondary Education
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide prospective and non-certified secondary school teachers with knowledge of theory and teaching practices, current educational goals, both nationally and locally, and trends in educational assessment and application. This knowledge will be used to plan, design and conduct effective instruction. Supplemental topics will include multi­culturalism, classroom management, and the inclusion of students with special needs. A 15-hour Field Experience outside of class time is required. Students are placed in a Howard County Public School or may use a K-12 school where they are employed. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Teaching Methodology requirement for an initial certificate in Secondary Education. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-290 Special Education General Methods Birth-12th Grade
3 Credits
Students will understand and use a variety of organizational, teaching, and classroom management strategies. The course will focus on effective practices in different settings with all disability groups, as well as collaboration with other involved professionals and parents. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Curriculum and Methodology of Instruction requirement for an initial certificate in Generic Special Education Infant/Primary, Elementary/Middle, and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-291 Special Education Methods Birth–8th Grade
3 Credits
Students develop knowledge and skills in planning lessons for diverse learners, teaching oral language, writing, reading, mathematics, and content area material to students with special needs in both early childhood and elementary settings. In addition, students will explore special topics including inclusion, transitioning, and social skills development. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Curriculum and Methodology of Instruction requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Generic Special Education Infant/Primary, Generic Special Education Elementary/Middle. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-292 Special Education Methods 6th Grade–12th Grade
3 Credits

This course presents current practices in teaching students with special needs in grades 6 through 12. Students will review and demonstrate a variety of teaching techniques in the areas of functional skills, managing the learning environment, reading, writing, mathematics, and the content areas. Special focus is placed on transition education and services for adolescents. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Curriculum and Methodology of Instruction requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-293 Special Education Assessment Part I Birth-12th Grade
3 Credits

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills for selecting, administering, interpreting, diagnosing, reporting, using assessment data, monitoring and evaluating the instructional program. Legal perspectives, technical aspects of assessment tools, accommodations, computer as a tool for assessment, and nondiscriminatory testing will be examined. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Assessment, Diagnosis, and Prescriptive Techniques requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Generic Special Education Infant/Primary, Generic Special Education Elementary/Middle, and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-294 Special Education Assessment Part II Birth-12th Grade
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide knowledge and skills in assessment, administration, interpretation, programming and alignment of test data with teaching standards. Trends in informal assessment, observation techniques, family assessment, vocational assessment, work sample analysis, task analysis, portfolios and teacher made tests will be explored. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Assessment, Diagnosis, and Prescriptive Techniques requirement for an initial certificate or renewal of certificate in Generic Special Education Infant/Primary, Generic Special Education ­Elementary/Middle, and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. (3 hours weekly)

EDUC-297 Field Experience: Introduction to Special Education
1 Credit

This is a field-based course that provides the opportunity to explore the theories learned regarding the various types of exceptional children. Students will analyze the various exceptionalities in the assigned classroom and the influence of these on learning. Prerequisite: This course is only available to those students who have successfully completed the equivalent of Introduction to Special Education at another higher education institution but who have not completed 15 hours of field experience as part of that course.

EDUC-298 Field Experience: Educational Psychology
1 Credit

This is a field-based course that provides the opportunity to apply the theories and methods learned regarding best practices for teaching and learning. Students will analyze a variety of learner characteristics, learning environment, and instructional techniques that influence academic achievement as is appropriate for age/grade level and professional specialization. Prerequisite: This course is only available to those students who have successfully completed the equivalent of Educational Psychology at another higher education institution but who have not completed 15 hours of field experience as part of that course.

EDUC-299 Field Experience: Methods of Teaching Secondary Education
1 Credit

This is a field-based course that provides the opportunity to apply the theories and methods learned regarding teaching practices, educational goals, and trends in educational assessment. Students will analyze instructional practices as they relate to teaching and learning as is appropriate for age/grade level and professional specialization. Prerequisite: This course is only available to those students who have successfully completed the equivalent of Methods of Teaching Secondary Education at another higher education institution but who have not completed 15 hours of field experience as part of that course.


ELECTRONICS

ELEC-107 Introduction to Electronic Circuits
4 Credits
Upon completion of this course, the student will have a thorough understanding of fundamentals of electronics. The student will study passive components and their behavior in DC circuits as well as in AC circuits. The student will learn fundamental laws that govern the electronics circuits such as Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s current/voltage laws, and Thevenin’s Theorem. Analysis of electric circuits with computer techniques will be covered as part of laboratory experiments. Basic electronics safety will be stressed. The student will have hands-on experience and a good understanding of laboratory test instruments and basic troubleshooting techniques. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH-061. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ELEC-117 Linear Electronics
4 Credits

In this course the student will learn the characteristics of electronic devices, such as diodes, transistors, and operational amplifiers, and their behavior in various electronic circuits. Specifically, applications of the following devices will be studied: rectifier diodes, zener diodes, bipolar junction transistors (BJT), field-effect transistors (FET). Also, various applications of the operational amplifier will be studied. Prerequisite: ELEC-107. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ELEC-140 Network Cabling Systems
3 Credits

This course is designed to train individuals in the fundamentals of installing, connecting and certifying network cabling systems. Students will learn to apply the basics of network cable and connector selection, installation and termination. Fundamental testing, certification, and documentation practices will be covered. Labs include hands-on experience with terminating and testing coaxial, unshielded twisted pair (UTP), and fiber optic cables in accordance with current industry and EIA/TIA standards. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ELEC-213 Digital Circuits
4 Credits

Principles of solid state devices will be utilized to study logic circuitry. The student will analyze, design, build and troubleshoot logic gates, pulse and switching circuits, arithmetic circuits, counters, registers, input/output, clock and control circuits, and memory units. Digital TTL integrated circuits and other logic families will be compared. The principles learned will be applied to various digital instruments and digital computer circuitry. Prerequisite: ELEC-107 or ELEC-112. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)


EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN/PARAMEDIC

EMSP-106 Emergency Medical Technician I
4 Credits

Successful completion of this course along with successful completion of EMSP-107: Emergency Medical Technician II prepares students for the Maryland and National Registry EMT certification written and practical examinations and follows the guidelines established for EMT training by the DOT/NHTSA/HRSA EMT Education Standards. Students will be able to properly perform the various psychomotor skills utilized by emergency medical technician-level prehospital care providers in the care of sick or injured persons. Course completion for CPR for the health care practitioner is an expected outcome for EMSP-106. Participation in EMSP-107 (the ride along component of EMT training) requires completion of the Health Sciences Division Health Data Form available on the HCC website. A criminal background investigation and drug screening will also be required for EMSP-107. Per Maryland law you must be at least 18 years of age (or 16-18 with signed parental permission) to take EMSP-106 and EMSP-107. Prerequisite: ENGL-093 or appropriate score on English placement test. (3 hours theory, 3 hours lab weekly)

EMSP-107 Emergency Medical Technician II
4 Credits
Successful completion of this course along with successful completion of EMSP-106: Emergency Medical Technician I prepares students for the Maryland and National Registry EMT certification written and practical examinations and follows the guidelines established for EMT training by the DOT/NHTSA/HRSA EMT Education Standards. Students will be able to properly perform the various psychomotor skills utilized by emergency medical technician-level prehospital care providers in the care of sick or injured persons. Participation in EMSP-107 (the ride along component of EMT training) requires completion of the Health Sciences Division Health Data Form available on the HCC website. A criminal background investigation and drug screening will also be required for EMSP-107. Per Maryland law you must be at least 18 years of age (or 16-18 with signed parental permission) to take EMSP-106 and EMSP-107. Prerequisite: Successful completion of EMSP-106 with a grade of “C” or higher. (3 hours theory, 3 hours lab weekly)

EMSP-110 EMT Clinical Experience
3 Credits

This course provides newly licensed and novice (minimally experienced) Maryland EMTs with the opportunity to obtain direct patient care experience under the direct supervision of Maryland EMS preceptors. Students will ride along with the on-duty crews of the fire department and will function as Maryland EMTs while adhering to the Maryland Protocols for EMS Providers. Students will ride in the field for approximately 45 hours and will attend class for 1.5 hours per week for the duration of the course. Prerequisite: Current Maryland EMT certification, and permission of the EMS Program Director. (1.5 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab weekly)

EMSP-160 Prevention and Management of Emergency Situations
6 Credits

Students will apply the basic concepts of human development, pathophysiology and pharmacology to assessment and management of emergency patients. They must be able to properly administer medications, and communicate effectively with patients and other members of the health care team. In addition, the paramedic student must be able to safely manage the scene of an emergency. Prerequisites: Current EMT-B Certification, MATH-060 or appropriate score on math placement test, ENGL-093 or appropriate score on English placement test, BIOL-203, BIOL-204, and MATH-105. (5.7 hours theory, 1 hour lab weekly)

EMSP-200 Airway, Patient Assessment and Trauma Management
9 Credits

Students will be able to establish and/or maintain a patent airway, oxygenate and ventilate a patient utilizing basic and advanced level skills, take a proper history, perform a comprehensive physical exam on any patient, and communicate the findings to others. In addition, the student will be able to integrate pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement a treatment plan for the trauma patient. Prerequisite: EMSP-160. (7.5 hours theory, 4.5 hours lab weekly)

EMSP-205 Medical Emergencies I
5 Credits

Students will be able to integrate pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for the cardiac patient. Prerequisite: EMSP-200. (5 hours weekly)

EMSP-210 Medical Emergencies II
9 Credits

Students will be able to integrate pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for patients exposed to toxic substances and induced or exacerbated illness related to communicable disease or environmentally hazardous conditions. Intervention for patients experiencing behavioral emergencies will be considered for promoting safety and therapeutic effect. Prerequisite: EMSP-205. (7.7 hours theory, 4 hours lab weekly)

EMSP-215 Medical Emergencies III
6 Credits

Students will be able to integrate pathophysiological principles and assessment findings to formulate a field impression and implement the treatment plan for neonatal, pediatric, obstetric, gynecology and geriatric patients. In addition, patients who are physically or mentally challenged, chronically ill patients and patients with common complaints will be examined for their unique special needs. Prerequisite: EMSP-210. (2.5 hours theory, 11.5 hours lab weekly)

EMSP-230 Paramedic Internship and Evaluation
5 Credits

Students will be able to participate in a variety of prehospital and hospital-based clinical settings to develop the necessary competencies to properly perform the various psychomotor (field) skills utilized by paramedics. Students will perform patient care in both simulated scenarios and with real patients under direct observation of paramedic and other clinical preceptors. This course will evaluate the student’s psychomotor skills as well as determine if they possess the appropriate knowledge (cognitive) and attitude (affective) attributes required of entry level EMT-Paramedics. The field internship portion of this course will follow the completion of hospital and field-based clinical rotations. The final weeks of this course will be utilized to prepare students for the National Registry of EMTs (NREMT) written and practical paramedic examinations. Students successfully complete the HCC EMS program following successful completion of all clinical requirements and upon passing the final written and practical evaluations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous EMSP courses. (2 hours theory, 18 hours lab weekly)

EMSP-290 Emerging Issues In Paramedicine
3 Credits
Emerging Issues in Paramedicine is designed to provide EMT-Paramedics, who received their training in a non-credit bearing academic setting or training academy, an opportunity to expand upon their education in pursuit of an academic degree. This course is a critical component in the Health Care Professional Degree Program. Students will use the 14 Attributes described in the EMS Agenda For The Future to identify and explore emerging issues with additional emphasis on current and future trends in the clinical scope of practice. Students will be provided readings and information on appropriate topics to be completed outside of class time. The face-to-face classroom component will be a mixture of content delivery and discussion with a majority of the time spent on student lead interactive discussions and activities designed to reinforce the content. Approximately 1/3 of the course will be spend in an individualized self-directed learning opportunity where the student will identify and explore in detail an emerging issue suited to their personal interest. Enrollment is limited to currently licensed and/or certified EMT-Paramedics. Prerequisites: Current licensure or certification at the state or national level for Emergency Medical Services – Paramedic and ENGL-093 or appropriate score on the English placement test. (3 hours weekly)


ENGINEERING

ENES-100 Introduction to Engineering Design
3 Credits

In this course, students are introduced to the engineering design process by working on a product design project. Working in teams, students will design and build a product that satisfies specified functional, or operational, requirements. The design will involve a variety of topics from engineering, technology and the sciences. Topics, with which students must become familiar in order to complete their project, will be drawn from various disciplines, such as mechanics, fluidics, energy concepts, thermodynamics, electrical circuits, and chemistry. In addition, students will use CAD software and other computer applications, such as word processors, spreadsheets and computer languages. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH-143 or above. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ENES-102 Introduction to Programming Concepts for Engineering
2 Credits

This course provides students with an introduction to the programming environment. Topics include principles of software development, high-level languages, input/output, data types and variables, operators and expressions, program selection, repetition, functions, arrays, strings, introduction to algorithms, software projects, debugging, and documentation. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ENES-120 Statics
3 Credits

Students will study the equilibrium of stationary bodies under the influence of various kinds of forces. Topics studied include: forces, moments, couples, equilibrium, frames and machines, centroids, moment of inertia, and friction. Vector and scalar methods are used to solve problems. Prerequisite: PHYS-110; Pre- or corequisite: MATH-150 or MATH-182. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ENES-130 Dynamics
3 Credits

This course will enable the student to acquire knowledge dealing with systems of heavy particles and rigid bodies in motion. In order to study such systems, it is necessary to learn force, acceleration, work, energy and impulse-momentum relationships. In addition, material will be discussed which covers motion of one body relative to another in a plane and in space. Prerequisite: ENES-120 and MATH-150 or MATH-182. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ENES-140 Mechanics of Materials
3 Credits

The student will acquire a knowledge of the distortion of engineering materials in relation to changes in stress or temperature. The geometry of internal strain and external displacement will be studied. Applications will be presented and discussed which cover beams, columns, shafts, tanks and other structural machine and vehicle members. Prerequisite: ENES-120 and MATH-150 or MATH-182 or equivalent. (3 hours weekly)

ENES-150 Intermediate Programming Concepts for Engineers
3 Credits

This course will introduce students to intermediate principles of software development and will include high-level languages, abstract data types, documentation, data structures, graphs, and dynamic memory allocation. Students will work in software development teams on projects in electrical and computer engineering fields. The programming language C will be used in a version control environment to design and test code. Software development projects will involve relevant engineering topics such as modeling, robotics, cryptography, bioinformatics, embedded software, game programming, image processing, and wireless sensor networks. Prerequisite: ENES-104 or appropriate score on placement test; corequisite: MATH-181. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ENES-159 Programming Concepts for Engineers
4 Credits

This course will introduce students to intermediate principles of software development and will include high level languages, object-oriented design, documentation, data structures, graphs and dynamic memory allocation. Students will become experienced in software applications in electrical and computer engineering, and software development in teams. Programs will utilize the C and Java languages under the Windows/cygwin environment. Software development projects will involve relevant engineering topics, such as analysis of digital and analog circuits, cryptography, bioinformatics, embedded software, game programming, image processing, and wireless sensor networks. Prerequisite: ENES-100. (4 hours weekly)

ENES-181 Thermodynamics
3 Credits

This course is designed for the student who plans to transfer to an engineering program. Topics covered include the following: introduction to thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of matter, laws of thermodynamics, cycles, reactions, mixtures, automobile engines and turbines. Prerequisite: MATH-182 and PHYS-111. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ENES-204 Basic Circuit Theory
3 Credits

The student will review the I-V relationships of resistors, capacitors, inductors, sources, op-amps, and transformers. The student will perform circuit analysis using Kirchoff’s laws, node and mesh analysis, superposition, Thevenin and Norton theorems. The student will also perform DC and AC steady state and impulse analysis for first and second order circuits using Laplace Transforms and the Convolution Integral. Prerequisite: PHYS-111; Corequisite: MATH-260. (3 hours weekly)

ENES-205 Electric Circuits
4 Credits

This course will instruct students in the design, analysis, simulation, construction, and evaluation of electric circuits. Students will review the I-V relationships of resistors, capacitors, inductors, sources, op-amps, and transformers. The student will perform circuit analysis using Kirchoff’s laws, node and mesh analysis, superposition, and Thevenin and Norton theorems. The student will also perform DC and AC steady state and impulse analysis for first and second order circuits. Prerequisite: PHYS-111; corequisite: MATH-260. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ENES-206 Fundamental Electric and Digital Circuit Laboratory
2 Credits
This course provides an introduction to basic measurement techniques and electrical laboratory equipment such as power supplies, oscilloscopes, and voltmeters. Students will design, simulate, and construct circuits containing passive elements, operational amplifiers and digital integrated circuits. Both transient and steady-state responses of these circuits will be studied. Prerequisite: ENES-244; corequisite: ENES-204. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ENES-222 Elements of Discrete Signal Analysis
4 Credits

All consumer and specialized electronics today involve measuring and recreating the world around us. This course introduces the concepts necessary to understand how to record and play back including: discrete-time and continuous-time signals, sampling, linear transformations, orthogonal projections, Discrete Fourier Transform, Fourier Series, discrete-time linear time, and frequency filters. One or more application-oriented projects will be required that use a modeling tool such as MatLab. Prerequisite: MATH-182. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ENES-241 Numerical Techniques in Engineering
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to computational and mathematical techniques used for solving problems in a variety of engineering applications. Students will develop an understanding of error analysis, problem conditioning and stability of algorithms. Topics include numerical solution of nonlinear equations, matrix algebra, Gaussian elimination, matrix inversion, iterative computation of eigenvalues, splines, and numerical integration. Vector spaces and linear transformations, LU factorization, similarity transformation and diagonalization, interpolation and data fitting are also studied. Using current real-world industry problems, students will gain hands-on experience and problem solving skills critical to their success as engineers in the computer age. Prerequisites: ENES-159 and MATH-150 or MATH-182. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ENES-244 Digital Logic Design
3 Credits

This course will introduce the basic principles and design procedures of digital systems at the gate and intermediate chip levels for electrical engineering students. The student will acquire knowledge of gates, flip‑flops, registers, counters, Karnaugh maps, PAL devices, and synchronous sequential circuit design and analysis. Prerequisites: ENES-100 and MATH-153. (4 hours weekly)

ENES-245 Digital Circuits and Systems Laboratory
2 Credits

This course introduces the modern electrical and computer engineering hardware and software for the digital circuits laboratory. The course begins with a review of basic electrical lab techniques and equipment (power supplies, oscilloscopes, voltmeters, etc.), followed by the design, characterization, simulation, and construction of digital circuits containing logic gates, sequential elements, oscillators, and digital integrated circuits. All digital design and simulation is done in the open architecture, industry standard called the Verilog Hardware Description Language (HDL). Prerequisite: ENES-244 and ENES-150, or ENES-244 and CMSY-171. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ENES-271 Introduction to MATLAB
3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce numerical methods to engineering students. Students will develop the skills to generate readable, compact, and verifiably correct MATLAB programs to obtain numerical solutions to a wide range of engineering models and to display the results with fully annotated graphics. Students will learn structured programming. Prerequisites: ENES-100 and MATH-150 or MATH-182. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

ENGLISH

ENGL-083 Academic Intermediate Reading for ESL Students
3 Credits

In this course, reading is approached as an integral part of an ESL student’s overall English language learning, not as an isolated skill. In addition to reading comprehension and vocabulary skill building, students will respond to information and concepts from a diversity of assigned materials, both orally and in writing. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on English placement tests. (4 hours weekly in class and lab)

ENGL-084 Academic Intermediate Writing and Grammar for ESL Students
3 Credits

In ENGL 084, students will acquire the English language skills needed to produce paragraphs at an intermediate proficiency level. A variety of reading selections and discussion activities will serve to prepare students to compose narrative, descriptive and expository paragraphs that reflect critical analysis. Writing themes will help students to develop a global awareness. Paragraph development will progress to the production of an organized essay by the end of the semester. Grammatical skills will be developed through formal instruction, group editing and computer-assisted instruction. This course will meet for four hours per week. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on English placement tests. (4 hours weekly in class and lab)

ENGL-085 Academic Advanced Oral Communication for ESL Students
3 Credits

In ENGL-085, students will develop the listening and speaking skills needed to succeed at a US college or university. Class work will consist of pronunciation practice, listening activities, small group and class discussion of selected readings and lectures, oral presentations, and simulations of aspects of academic life. If students place into 2 or more ESL courses, they are required to take ENGL-085. Students can be exempted from this requirement by passing an oral exam. Students placed into ENGL-083 AND ENGL-084 must complete both ENGL-083 and ENGL-084 before taking ENGL-085. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-086/087 Academic Advanced ESL Reading, Writing and Grammar Combined
6 Credits

ENGL-086/087 Combined is a fully integrated approach to teaching reading, composition, and grammar. Emphasis is placed on reading comprehension, vocabulary development, critical analysis, reading rate, and the composition of clear, organized, grammatically correct assignments. By responding to information and concepts from a diversity of assigned materials, students will develop a global awareness. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on English placement tests or successful completion of ENGL 083 and/or 084. Corequisite: FYEX-100. (8 hours weekly)

ENGL-086 Academic Advanced Reading for ESL Students
3 Credits

Students will continue to develop their reading skills in ENGL-086 with an emphasis on academic material. Reading is approached as an integral part of an ESL student’s overall English language learning, not as an isolated skill. In addition to reading comprehension and vocabulary skill building, students will respond to information and concepts from a diversity of assigned materials, both orally and in writing. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on English placement tests or successful completion of ENGL-083; Corequisite: FYEX-100. (4 hours weekly in class and lab)

ENGL-087 Academic Advanced Writing and Grammar for ESL Students
3 Credits

In ENGL-087, students will acquire the English language skills needed to write multi-paragraph compositions at a level of correctness and fluency appropriate for an advanced learner of English who will soon enroll in a college composition class. Readings and discussions will prepare students to write narrative, descriptive, expository and argumentative compositions that reflect critical analysis. Writing themes will help students to develop a global awareness. Relevant grammatical skills will be developed through formal instruction, group editing and computer-assisted instruction. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on English placement tests or successful completion of ENGL-084. (4 hours weekly in class and lab)

ENGL-088 Grammar for Written Expression (ESL)
1 Credit

This grammar-intensive course for advanced-level ESL students will help strengthen students’ writing by improving fluency and accuracy. Course work will focus on the complexities of the English verb system and verb forms, covering such topics as tense, voice, modals, gerunds, infinitives, and participles. Students will learn, practice, and apply grammar rules and concepts to create well-written sentences, improve the flow of ideas in paragraphs, and identify and correct errors in their writing. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL-087 or eligible for ENGL-121. (1 hour weekly)

ENGL-093 Directed Studies in Reading
3 Credits

Directed Studies in Reading is a developmental course designed to strengthen students’ reading skills. In this course, the student in need of intensive reading instruction will complete prescribed activities to develop vocabulary and improve reading comprehension. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on reading placement tests. (4 hours weekly)

ENGL-094 Directed Studies in Writing
3 Credits

Directed Studies in Writing is a ­developmental course designed to strengthen students’ writing skills. Beginning with sentences and progressing to paragraphs, students learn to construct clearly written, logically organized, grammatically correct papers. ENGL­­‑094 meets in a net­­worked, computerized environment. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on the writing placement test. (4 hours weekly)

ENGL-096/097 Fundamentals of Academic Reading and Writing Combined
6 Credits

ENGL-096/097 COMBINED integrates the reading and composition curricula of ENGL-096 and ENGL-097 into a single course. Working with one instructor, students read about important academic topics and respond to them through written assignments. Writing multi-paragraph essays, students learn to write clearly and convincingly using logical organization and appropriate grammar and usage. In reading, students develop proficiency in comprehending and interpreting a variety of college level reading materials. The emphasis is academic reading as a holistic, dynamic, interactive process. Students develop an understanding of this process by practicing and mastering various reading strategies. ENGL-096/097 COMBINED includes four hours of classroom instruction and four hours of individualized lab work. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on Engish placement tests or successful completion of ENGL-093/094. Corequisite: FYEX-100. (8 hours weekly)

ENGL-096 Fundamentals of Academic Reading
3 Credits

In ENGL-096, students will develop proficiency in comprehending and interpreting a variety of college level reading materials. The course empha­sis is academic reading as a holistic, dynamic, inter­active process. Students will develop an under­standing of this process by practicing and mastering various reading strategies. The course includes two hours of classroom instruction and two hours of reading lab. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on English placement tests or successful completion of ENGL-093. Corequisite: FYEX-100. (4 hours weekly)

ENGL-097  Fundamentals of Writing
3 Credits

In ENGL-097, students will acquire the skills needed to write and revise a series of multi-paragraph essays. Students will also learn to write clearly and convincingly using logical organization and appropriate styles of standard written English. The varied writing assignments will be supplemented by topical readings, oral and electronic discussions, peer review and grammar instruction as needed. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on English placement tests or successful completion of ENGL-094. (4 hours weekly)

ENGL-115 Creative Writing
3 Credits

Creative Writing introduces students to the process of using their own experiences and backgrounds to express themselves in poetry and short fiction. In addition, students are introduced to the literary elements appropriate to these genres. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-121 College Composition
3 Credits (English Composition Core)

ENGL-121 guides students through the expository writing process through close reading of contemporary critical discourse and teaches the rhetorical arts of argument and persuasion through critical thinking, reading and research. Students will develop an understanding of themselves as readers and writers of world cultures who participate with others in responsible public discourse and have moral and ethical responsibilities in that discourse; students will also examine the relationship among writer, audience, and purpose, and practice writing prose through a recursive process. Students completing this course should be able to write persuasive, researched and documented essays (of at least 1,000 words) demonstrating the conventions of standard written English and manuscript presentation. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL-121 is based on English placement test scores or the successful completion of required developmental English course work. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-125 Concept and Story Development
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to concept development and storytelling methods through a series of short writing assignments of various forms. Students will generate ideas and stories for creative projects in print and electronic media such as television, radio and film. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as TVRD-125.

ENGL-126 Introduction to Journalism
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

This course will provide a framework for the practical applications required to operate as a journalist in the twenty-first century. Students will discuss the role and responsibility of press in a free society and will benefit from the opportunity to evaluate popular journalistic mediums and their respective contents while applying their conclusions to their own decisions and styles as future journalists. They will take on the role of journalist as they adhere to the professional standards of news, feature, and opinion pieces for a magazine or newspaper. Finally, students will implement the writing process, from research, interviewing, and note taking through editing, proofreading, and potential publication. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as TVRD-126.

ENGL-200 Children’s Literature
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

Children’s Literature examines the historical background and development of works written for young people. Students are presented with criteria for assessing both text and illustrations of classic and contemporary works written for diverse audiences of children and young adults with a strong focus on terminology and a variety of genres. This is a writing intensive course. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-201 American Literature I
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)
American Literature I surveys a range of work produced in the United States of America from the time of the European immigrations of the 1600s through the post-Civil War era. Representative literary works by men and women from diverse ethnic, racial, and social groups are studied in their historical, social, political, and economic context for what they both reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience—including fiction, nonfiction and writings from the American Revolution. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121.  (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-202 American Literature II
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

American Literature II studies literature written in the United States of America from the mid-nineteenth century to recent times. Works are chosen to represent diverse ethnic, racial and social groups in historical, political and economic contexts for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character. Representative works include Realist and Naturalist literature, immigrant and Native American experience, classic work from WWI and WWII eras, and feminist expression, among others. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-203 English Literature I
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

English Literature I examines language, ideas and political/cultural values in English literature from Anglo-Saxon times through the Renaissance and into the 1700s. Students explore a variety of genres, such as poetry, letters, and drama, and study major authors such as Shakespeare as well as texts representing diverse perspectives of men and women in English literature.  Key motifs from the texts include history, ideology, and the evolving ideas about humanity and the rise of individualism. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-204 English Literature II
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)
English Literature II examines language, ideas, and political/cultural values in English literature from the Romantic period of the late 1700s through the Victorian era and into the 1900s. Students read poems, plays and novels encompassing issues like civil rights, colonialism, sexuality and political power; they study writing that celebrates new freedoms and new ways of assessing humanity, self and the world through diverse perspectives, including authors such as Austen, Beckett, Blake, Eliot, Hardy, Joyce, Tennyson, Wordsworth, Wollstonecraft, Woolf, and Yeats. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-205 The Short Story
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

The Short Story offers a basic introduction to that genre of literature. Students focus on the critical evaluation of representative short stories by diverse authors from around the world, with an emphasis on American and European writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries such as Anton Chekhov, D. H. Lawrence and more contemporary writers, such as Margaret Atwood and Milan Kundera. Students are presented with literary terminology and concepts necessary to the discussion and evaluation of these works. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-206 African American Literature
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

African American Literature studies oral and written stories of African American writers from the 18th century through the Harlem Renaissance to present times, including authors such as Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and Martin Luther King, Jr.. Students analyze major themes like alienation, identity, double-consciousness, racism, classism, rebellion, revolt and escape. They both evaluate these works for their literary merit and make connections between the literature and their own experience. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-207 Ethics in Literature
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)
Ethics in Literature studies poems, short stories, drama and novels with the intention of probing both their literary merit and the ethical questions embedded within them. Students apply literary terminology and basic principles of ethics in order to understand and appreciate these works. The course emphasizes close and perceptive reading, thoughtful discussion and reflection. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-208 Contemporary American Poetry
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

Contemporary American Poetry focuses on the richness and diversity of America’s finest poets. The course begins with a brief selection of earlier significant poets who provide a historical perspective. Students then concentrate on the literary elements and merit of material written from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Course work emphasizes close readings and class discussion of a body of works varied in style and content. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-209 Modern Drama
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities/Arts Core)

Modern Drama studies work written for European and American theater in the last and present century. Students discuss and appraise plays; identify basic elements which distinguish modern drama from earlier periods; evaluate performances of contemporary plays; and study what playwrights have said about the nature of drama. Students also discuss the impact of major philosophical and scientific achievements on dramatic material. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-209.

ENGL-210 Introduction to Fiction, Poetry and Drama
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

Introduction to Fiction, Poetry and Drama studies conventions and characteristics of these three genres of literature and is particularly recommended for students new to the study of literature. Students study terminology and literary concepts in order to interpret, analyze and critically evaluate selections from stories, poems and plays. In addition, they are introduced to critical reading strategies, literary criticism, and an expanding literary canon which includes the work of culturally diverse writers including a classic piece from Greek or Shakespearian theatre. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-211 Science Through Science Fiction
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities/Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

Science through Science Fiction focuses on themes of controversial scientific discovery and innovation, exploring both the wonder and the danger. Students view films and read short stories and novels then illustrate comprehension of scientific background and literary concepts through class discussion, essay exams and literary projects. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-212 By and About Women
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

By and About Women studies literature written by female authors and/or about female characters. Students critically evaluate a variety of texts for form and technique. In addition, students analyze the validity of the female experience as portrayed in literature and are expected to gain insight into the challenges and power of women in literature and in life. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as WMST-212.

ENGL-213 Latin American Literature
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

Latin American Literature, in English translation, from the pre-Colonial era to the present, introduces students to major literary topics and themes within a variety of Latin American nations and cultures, including indigenous and Afro-Latin voices. Genres studied include the novel, the short story, poetry, the testimonial narrative, and historical nonfiction. Readings, films, and discussion help provide the social and historical context necessary for understanding and appreciating Latin American literature from Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-214 Middle Eastern Literature
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

Middle Eastern Literature in English translation will examine major works by Arab and Arab-American writers from the advent of World War II to the present. The course will introduce students to major Middle East literary topics and themes, most notably from those countries that felt the greatest impact of Western influence, signaling a change in literary technique and theme: Egypt, Palestine, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iran and Iraq. Genres studied will include the novel/, the short story, poetry and historical nonfiction necessary for understanding the broad social, cultural and political changes wrought by Western presence, including the changing roles of women in Arab/Islamic culture. The course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-215 Advanced Creative Writing
3 Credits

Advanced Creative Writing is designed for those students who have mastered fundamental elements of creative writing. Assignment include writing poetry and short fiction. Students are encouraged to draw on their backgrounds and experience to shape their writing. This course differs from ENGL-115 in terms of proficiency expected: students of advanced creative writing are expected to achieve a higher level of proficiency and/or be further along in their work. Prerequisite: ENGL-115. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-216 Contemporary Drama: Topics in Diversity
3 Credits (Literature/Arts/Humanities Core)

Contemporary Drama studies works written for European and American theater from 1950 until current practice. Students discuss and appraise plays; identify basic elements which distinguish contemporary drama from earlier periods; evaluate performances of contemporary plays; and study what playwrights have said about the nature of drama. Students are introduced to the formalist conventions and characteristics, terms and concepts, and critical theory of drama in order to master skills in interpretation, analysis, and critical evaluation Students also discuss the impact of gender, race, culture, and sexual orientation studies on dramatic material. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-216.

ENGL-217 The English Bible as Literature
3 Credits (Literature/Arts/Humanities Core)

The English Bible as Literature studies the King James version of the English Bible as literature, providing necessary background to understand the books of the Bible in historical and cultural context, including the questions of authorship, canonization, and translation. The course also emphasizes the types of literature to be found in the Bible, including narrative, poetry, biography, history, epistolary writing, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, and apocalyptic literature. In addition, the course explores the influence the Bible has had on other literature and on different disciplines, such as art, music, film, and contemporary popular culture. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-218 Introduction to Film and Literature
3 Credits (Literature/Arts/Humanities Core)

Introduction to Film and Literature is a comparative study of films and the literary sources upon which they are based, with special attention given to basic differences between genres. Students are introduced to the formalist conventions and characteristics, terms and concepts, and critical theory of film and literature in order to master skills in interpretation, analysis, and critical evaluation. The course explores a variety of styles, periods, and forms, but individual sections of the course may focus on a genre, topic, or theme. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-218.

ENGL-219 Asian Literature
3 Credits (Humanities/Literature Core)

This course is an introduction to Asian literature from ancient times to contemporary writings. Students will read, analyze, and research diverse and significant Asian literary texts in the context of their cultural values and historical periods and apply basic literary terms, concepts, and critical strategies while learning to appreciate the conventions of a variety of genres. Students will have the opportunity to devote significant time to the research and analysis of literature from a particular country, such as China or Japan, in addition to developing an appreciation for the vastness and diversity of Asian literary traditions. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-223 Writing for Screen Narrative
3 Credits
This course will teach the strategies and means to develop and execute narrative scripts with the primary focus on the short form narrative film. Emphasis is placed on the student’s increasing ability to employ the tools of the craft, including but not limited to, story structure, mythic structure, plot, characterization, dialogue, format, story editing and revision. Conventional scriptwriting techniques will be covered as well as critical approaches to understanding these techniques. Elements of the feature film form will be studied, extrapolated and applied to shorter forms as well. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as TVRD-223 and FILM-223.

ENGL-224 Writing for Radio and Multimedia
3 Credits

This course is an overview and introduction to writing for ear and writing for multimedia productions as they relate specifically to radio. Students will write and voice original scripts using studio recording equipment, editing software, and multimedia software tools. Emphasis is on analysis of peer scripts as well as the scripts of professional productions, and on revision. Students create several projects with focus on audience demographics, research, script writing format, storyboarding and completing a multimedia production. Topics include news writing, interviewing, promos, PSAs, commercials, pitches, personal essays, blogging and audio slideshows. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as TVRD-224.

ENGL-226 World Literature I
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

Students read, analyze, and research diverse and significant literary texts from antiquity to the Renaissance in the context of their cultural values and historical periods and apply basic literary terms, concepts, and critical strategies while learning to appreciate the conventions of a variety of genres. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-227 World Literature II
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

Students read, analyze, and research diverse and significant literary texts from the Renaissance to the present in the context of their cultural values and historical periods and apply basic literary terms, concepts, and critical strategies while learning to appreciate the conventions of a variety of genres. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-228 Introduction to Memoir and Autobiography
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

Introduction to Memoir and Autobiography studies the literary genres and conventions of memoir and autobiography and is particularly recommended for students interested in writing about their life experiences. Students research and study literary elements of narrative forms and storytelling traditions of different cultures, as well as listen to a variety of authors and original voices in order to critically analyze stories that define the human experience. Students draw on their backgrounds and experiences to create memoirs. They also explore practical applications of narrative writing in journals and contemporary media. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-230 Technical Writing
3 Credits
This intensive writing class provides an introduction to technical and professional communication. In an interactive workshop format, students learn to think critically about the informative, persuasive and ethical dimensions of their writing. They study rhetorical principles and apply them to an array of assignments, from brief memos to formal proposals. In addition, students learn how to adapt their writing process to rapidly changing communication technologies, how to effectively write in a collaborative setting, and how to connect with a specific audience. (While this class is appropriate for all majors, it is especially helpful for those students enrolled in the Computer Science/Information Technologies major.) Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL-230 is based on successful completion of ENGL-121 or on English placement test scores. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-240 Applied English Grammar
3 Credits
Students of Applied English Grammar will analyze the grammar, syntax, history, and conventional usage of the English language, including its definitions, functions and relationships among its words; the types, styles, and logic of its sentences; and effective use of punctuation. Students will apply these principles through editing, reading, writing, speaking, and critical thinking activities and assignments. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENGL-250 Shakespeare from Page to Stage
3 Credits (Literature/Arts/Humanities Core)

Shakespeare from Page to Stage focuses on reading, analyzing and interpreting Shakespeare’s plays as literary texts; understanding them as products of specific historical, cultural and artistic currents, and as performance text meant for production. Emphasis is given to the process that transforms literary text through production, informed by literary and theatrical elements. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-250.

ENGL-251 Shakespeare from Page to Screen
3 Credits (Literature/Arts/Humanities Core)

This course focuses on reading, analyzing and interpreting Shakespeare’s plays as they have been adapted to film; understanding them as products of specific historical, cultural and artistic currents, as performance text meant for production within the constraints of the medium of film. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-251 and THET-251.


ENTREPRENEURSHIP

ENTR-100 Introduction to the Entrepreneurial Process
2 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This interdisciplinary course is designed to help students to discover and develop the personal attributes needed to become a successful entrepreneur or intrapreneur. The core of the course focuses on the discovery and understanding of entrepreneurial attitudes and behaviors within oneself. The student will begin to understand the competencies required to be an entrepreneur through case studies, creative problem solving and exercises aimed at self-development. Students will identify, discuss and grow an idea about a business they might one day start. They will have an opportunity to participate in the business planning process. (2 hours weekly)

ENTR-101 Entrepreneurship and Creativity
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This interdisciplinary course is designed to introduce students to the concept of sustainable entrepreneurship, a manageable process that can be applied across careers and work settings. It focuses on building entrepreneurial attitudes and behaviors that will lead to creative solutions within community and organizational environments. Course topics include the history of entrepreneurship, the role of entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs in the 21st century global economy, and the identification of entrepreneurial opportunities. The elements of creative problem-solving, the development of a business concept/model, the examination of feasibility studies, and the social/moral/ethical implications of entrepreneurship will be incorporated. This course is directed toward forging views of entrepreneurship and intrapreneurship as they operate in today’s world. Credit will only be granted for one of the following:  ENTR-100 or ENTR-101. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENTR-102 Entrepreneurial Assessment
1 Credit

This course is a guided process that establishes a link between the entrepreneur and the Center for Entrepreneurial and Business Excellence (CEBE). The entrepreneur will be able to identify the needs and goals of his existing or proposed business and determine the status of development and operation. An assessment report will develop from initial input from the entrepreneur to the business coach. Based on recommendations, the entrepreneur will analyze methods and pathways to pursue in accord with the services and curricula offered by the CEBE. (1 hour weekly)

ENTR-103 Starting Your Own Business I
3 Credits

ENTR-103 provides the entrepreneur with a guide through the process of business start up or enhancement. Following the completion of the ENTR-103, the entrepreneur will bring the business to successful launch or have discovered ways to improve the existing business. Goals and progress toward goals are reviewed with changes made as needed. The entrepreneur participates in networking with other businesses and resources. The entrepreneur uses these resources to enhance business opportunities. Prerequisite: ENTR-102. (3 hours weekly)

ENTR-104 Business Plan Development
3 Credits

In this course the entrepreneur participates in a series of three modules that are critical components of a business plan. The entrepreneur will examine the industry that incorporates their business and will look at potential forces that may impact the success of their business. They will examine the customer base and competition. They will discuss how to produce revenue and growth and will examine the financial situation, with a projection of the company’s financial future. Prerequisite: ENTR-102. (3 hours weekly)

ENTR-105 Business Plan Writing
1 Credit

In this course the entrepreneur assembles the component parts of the business plan and completes the written document. The completion of this document prepares the entrepreneur for funding. The entrepreneur will create a plan which is a road map that includes goals for producing revenue and additional growth. Prerequisite: ENTR-104, ENTR-120 or ENTR 210. (1 hour weekly)

ENTR-106 Presenting the Business Plan
1 Credit

This course prepares the entrepreneur to describe the particular company and present the business plan to potential funding sources. The basic principles and techniques of presentation and practice with feedback are included. The entrepreneur will present the business plan to a jury that includes select members of the advisory board, faculty, and other students. Prerequisite: ENTR-104 or ENTR-105 or ENTR-120 or ENTR-210. (1 hour weekly)

ENTR-107 Business Problem-Solving for the Entrepreneur
1 Credit

This course prepares the entrepreneur to identify one or more area(s) of need specific to the business. The entrepreneur assesses the need(s), develops solutions, establishes outcomes, and develops a framework for monitoring outcomes. Business Problem Solving for the Entrepreneur is available in the following areas pertinent to business start up: strategy development, use of technology, human resource management, legal issues and accounting. Prerequisite: ENTR-102 and ENTR-103. (1 hour weekly)

ENTR-108 Marketing Plan Development
3 Credits

In this three module course the entrepreneur will complete a marketing plan for the business. The entrepreneur will complete market research that will help define relevant needs of the customer base. He/she will define the elements of the marketing mix, product, price, place and promotion, for their business and explain their role in building a successful marketing strategy. Prerequisite: ENTR-102 or ENTR-120 or ENTR-210. (3 hours weekly)

ENTR-109 Customer Service for the New Business Start Up
1 Credit
In this course the entrepreneur discovers the elements of the customer service function pertinent to their business. Topics include establishing effective and efficient interpersonal relations with current and potential clients. Functions such as initiating contact, providing clear information, determining level of client need and understanding, and incorporating office procedures are emphasized. (1 hour weekly)

ENTR-110 Basic Website Development
1 Credit

In this course the entrepreneur works with others to develop a website appropriate for the business. The entrepreneur learns how the web can work for the business and how to most effectively establish a presence on the web. The entrepreneur works with an expert to define meaningful information about their company and its products or services. The information is then put up on the Website where it can be viewed in an interactive manner. Prerequisite: ENTR-102, ENTR-103 or ENTR-108. (1 hour weekly)

ENTR-111 Advanced Website Development
1 Credit

In this course the entrepreneur receives support in development of an electronic business enhancement to their website. Prerequisite: ENTR-110. (15 hours)

ENTR-120 Entrepreneurship in Practice
3 Credits

This second-level course is designed to prepare business students and others to succeed in the new, global economy by teaching them to think and act like entrepreneurs. Students will learn the skills required to launch and manage new ventures, within or outside of the corporate environment. Case studies, virtual enterprises, simulations, and interaction with local entrepreneurs will allow students to practice and refine their entrepreneurial skills. Course topics include recognizing opportunity and risk, developing a business model, securing resources, managing the new venture, ethical issues, and planning for growth and change. Prerequisite: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

ENTR-154 Introduction to eBay®
1 Credit
This course serves as an introduction to online auctioneering using eBay®.com. After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to understand effective bidding strategies when purchasing items as well as how to maximize opportunity for success in selling items listed for sale on eBay®.com. Familiarity with a computer, the Internet, and email skills are strongly recommended before enrolling in this course. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work may be done outside of class (except tests) if student has compatible software. Credit will only be granted for one of the following: ENTR-154 or ENTR-205.

ENTR-205 eBay® and Other Online Auction Tools
3 Credits

This course serves as an introduction to online auctioneering by utilizing various online auc­tion­eering websites as business tools. Through a comprehensive exploration of the online auction process, students will learn about various auction strategies for the purpose of purchasing and selling goods online. This will enable students to determine which online auction strategies and techniques work best for their specific area of product interest. Students will employ supplemental online auction tools as aids in this web-based business format. Students will examine, use, and evaluate core business concepts such marketing, sales, inventory management, and finance and trace the impacts that these components have when operating as an online auction business. Credit will only be granted for one of the following: ENTR-154 or ENTR-205.

ENTR-210 Developing Business Opportunities and Plans
3 Credits

This course provides basic information and skills needed by students who wish to develop their own small business, who currently work in such an operation, or who function in a larger business which cultivates intrapreneurship. The essential elements of this course revolve around recognizing new opportunities for entrepreneurial activities, developing successful methods of perceiving such endeavors, and selecting mechanisms needed to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of a new or evolving entrepreneurial venture. (3 hours weekly)

ENTR-215 Taking Innovation to Market
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

Students will work in peer teams under the guidance of entrepreneurial mentors to complete the facets of developing innovations. Students will learn the phases of transforming innovation to the business world. This will include identifying, assessing, marketing, and determining licensure of innovations. Students will examine real-life technology overviews prepared by participating research labs and work with team members, inventors, and mentors to take an innovation to the marketplace. Through these processes, team work, decision-making, and analyses will be prime areas of learning. (3 hours weekly)

ENTR-220 Financing Entrepreneurial Operations
3 Credits

This course is designed to improve the potential for entrepreneurial success by increasing skills and knowledge of three basic elements: starting an entrepreneurial enterprise, sustaining it, and facilitating its growth. Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback from an industry panel. Students are expected to exit the course with the knowledge and skill to apply for funds. (3 hours weekly)

ENTR-225 Social Entrepreneurship
3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to social entrepreneurship. A social entrepreneur recognizes a social problem and uses entrepreneurial principles to organize, create, and manage a venture to achieve social change. The social entrepreneur focuses on creating social capital. The primary goal of social entrepreneurship is to further social and environmental causes. Social entrepreneurs are most commonly associated with the voluntary and not-for-profit sectors, but this need not preclude making a profit. Course topics include the manner in which both business and entrepreneurial principles apply to social entrepreneurship and the process for the development of new products or services that contribute to the solution of a social problem. This course provides the knowledge of fundamental business concepts and tools to build a social venture. The course will focus on one broad social problem each semester and students will learn to set up a business relevant to finding a solution to that social problem. (3 hours weekly)


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

ENST-200 Fundamentals of Soil Science
4 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of soil science. The physical, chemical and biological properties of soils will be emphasized and soil classification, genesis, distribution, ecology and plant‑soil relationships will be examined. The laboratory component will introduce students to field methods used in soil science, including soil survey, soil analysis and soil management. Field trips to local sites will be included. Prerequisite: CHEM-101. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

ENST-233 Introduction to Environmental Health
3 Credits

This course examines the impact that environmental factors such as air, water and food have on human health and well-being, and how people influence the quality of their environment. Students will learn about how human evolution and prosperity results in challenges associated with pollution, overpopulation, health economics, environmental policy, and other issues. Environmental health tools, such as epidemiology, toxicology, policy, and regulation will be applied to current issues of concern. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PUBH-233.


EXERCISE SCIENCE

EXSC-100 Introduction to Physical Education
1 Credit
This course is designed to present the basic concepts and physical skills necessary for basic instruction of movement activities at the elementary education level. The student will participate in and develop leadership skills for instructing such activities. (1 hour weekly)

EXSC-101 Introduction to Exercise Science
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of individual academic subdisciplines of Exercise Science. The development of Exercise Science as an academic discipline and the relationship between the subdisciplines will be discussed. Career opportunities in the exercise field will be examined. (1 hour weekly)

EXSC-110 Introduction to Athletic Training
1 Credit

This course is designed as an introduction to athletic training. The athletic trainer as an allied health care professional will be examined. The manual skills required in the profession will also be examined. (1 hour weekly)

EXSC-120 Introduction to Sports Coaching
3 Credits

This course will provide information on the sport sciences, including anatomy, physiology, psychology, biomechanics, and skill acquisition, which are vital for coaches in a range of sports. Methods for improving the athlete’s performance and well-being will be examined. The principles of coaching will be covered where the student will develop a personal coaching philosophy and style. A balanced approach to coaching will be emphasized. (3 hours weekly)

EXSC-150 Sport and Society
3 Credits

Sport will be related to such social problems as delinquency, segregation, collective behavior and leisure; to social processes such as socialization, stratification, mobility and social control; and to those familiar social institutions the family, the school, the church, the military, the economy, the polity and the mass media. (3 hours weekly)

EXSC-200 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries
3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the necessary skills and competencies required for treatment of basic athletic injuries. This course will include the study of modern theories and principles of athletic training mechanisms as well as the nature and causes of the most common sports-related injuries. (3 hours weekly)

EXSC-209 Sport and Exercise Nutrition
3 Credits

This course will apply the basic nutritional theories, principles, and concepts to participation in fitness and sports activities. The requirements necessary for participation and performance enhancement for all levels of athletic and exercise performance will be examined. Students will learn to apply the various sports nutrition concepts for recreational to elite level athletes. Course content includes energy systems, hydration, pre-and post-event nutrition, ergogenic aids, weight management and body composition issues of athletes. (3 hours weekly)

EXSC-210 Sport and Exercise Psychology
3 Credits
This course will provide the student with the opportunities to study human behavior in sport and exercise settings. It is designed to provide the students with the information about research in the field of sport psychology as well as practical knowledge to become a more effective fitness instructor, athlete, athletic administrator, physical educator, personal trainer, or coach. It will examine theories of individual personality and explore the social phenomenon associated with sport participation. (3 hours weekly)

EXSC-220 Introduction to the Martial Arts
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with a comparative study of the diverse martial arts systems of the world. Martial arts of various regions and cultures will be examined including those of Ancient Greece and Rome, Southeast Asia, East Asia, Africa, South America, Europe, and North America. This course will examine the physical, psychological, historical, anthropological, and social influences of the martial arts on global societies. The impact of gender, culture, and competition on the development and variation of indigenous martial arts will be investigated. The role martial arts have played and play in the development of fine and performance arts will also be examined. (3 hours weekly)

EXSC-230 Philosophy of the Martial Arts
3 Credits

This course will examine the philosophical bases of the martial arts of the world, including those of Ancient Greece and Rome, Southeast Asia, East Asia, Africa, South America, Europe, and North America. The impact various philosophical systems have had on the development of the martial arts will be investigated. Conversely, the influence martial arts may have had on the development of the philosophical systems themselves will be reviewed. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PHIL-230.

EXSC-250 Exercise Science Internship
3 Credits

This course will involve the practical application of knowledge and skills to an exercise science setting. Specific emphasis on the development of a professional practices demonstrating understanding of personal training, fitness development, and administrative practices related to occupations related to exercise sciences. This Internship must cover a period of a minimum of 12 consecutive weeks. Prerequisites: EXSC-101, EXSC-200, EXSC-210, and HEED-200. (3 hours weekly)


FARSI

FARS-101 Elementary Farsi I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Farsi-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Farsi language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Farsi language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

FARS-102 Elementary Farsi II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)
In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Farsi-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Farsi language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Farsi language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

FARS-201 Intermediate Farsi I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Farsi-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Farsi language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Farsi language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

FARS-202 Intermediate Farsi II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at an intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in complex structures and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Farsi-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Farsi language to other relevant disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Farsi language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)


FILM

FILM-101 Introduction to Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an introduction to the history of film as well as to the vocabulary and analytical skills with which to approach the study of motion pictures. The course will examine film form, style, and industry practices through readings, film screenings, and discussions, learning to watch films with the goals of critical thinking, thoughtful discussion, and interpretive writing. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-104 Lives of the Artists Through Film
3 Credits

The ties between great artists and motion pictures tend to transcend the artists and their masterpieces from their two-dimensional canvas confines into the conscious popularity of the general public. This course is an introduction into the historic and cinematic world of several artists, from artists such as Michelangelo to Frida Kahlo. The course consists of lectures, the viewing of films, discussion, and journaling. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-108 The Golden Age of Hollywood
3 Credits

This course will explore the classic Hollywood films of the 1930s and 1940s. This course will introduce the most popular narrative tendencies and film genres that were developed during the Golden Age of Hollywood cinema, from the rise and fall of the major classical Hollywood studios, to the definition of the key characteristics of seamless storytelling and the basic mode of film production used during this period. Major films and significant directors from this period will be viewed and discussed. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-139 Principles of Film and Media Production
3 Credits

This course is an interdisciplinary study of film and media production. Emphasis is on the overview of the various types of media production a film/video student could pursue in the commercial, corporate, or artistic world. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as TVRD-139.

FILM-171 Introduction to American Cinema
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)
This course will focus on the history of American Cinema from the beginnings of the silent film era to the present day. Students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of aesthetic principles as they apply to the film as an art medium. The student will view a wide variety of selected films and discuss them in class. The student will demonstrate a prescribed level of mastery of technical terms and concepts on examination. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-172 Introduction to World Cinema
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course will focus on the thematic and technical concerns of great European and Asian directors from the era of the silent film and the Soviet philosophy of montage editing in the 1920s to the cinematic philosophies of the current day. Films from at least seven different countries will be featured. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-203 Indian Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary Indian society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within India from the 1900s to the present. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-204 Middle Eastern Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary Middle Eastern society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within the Middle East from the 1960s to the present. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-205 Italian Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary Italian society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social and cultural realities of Italy from 1945 to the present. Special emphasis on the movement of Italian neorealism and post-neorealism with reference to some major Italian writers (Verga, Pirandello, Moravia, C. Levi, etc.) and their influential works. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ITAL-205.

FILM-206 French Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary French society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to trace the history of film in France, and show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical and cultural realities of France from the dawn of cinema in the early 1900s to the present, with special emphasis on the French New Wave movement with reference to some major French directors (Truffaut, Renoir, Godard) and their influential works. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FREN-206.

FILM-207 German Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)
This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary German society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within Germany from the 1900s to the present. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as GERM-207.

FILM-208 Asian Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)
This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary Asian society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within Asia from the 1960s to the present. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-209 Scandinavian Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary Scandinavian society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within Scandinavia from the 1960s to the present. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-210 Russian Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of Russian society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within Russia from the 1920s to the present. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as RUSS-210.

FILM-211 African Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of various African societies and cultures through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within various African countries from the 1920s to the present. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-212 The Films of Alfred Hitchcock
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the films of Alfred Hitchcock. Students will view a variety of Hitchcock’s films which span his career from Easy Virtue in 1928 to Family Plot in 1976. Supplemental videos will present some of Hitchcock’s working practices and examples of his work in TV. Readings will include critical analyses. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-213 Silent Film
3 Credits

This course focuses on the development of visual language, genres, social attitudes and acting style of the silent film era. Major films and significant directors will be covered. This is a detailed critical guide to several silent motion picture projects, from Eadweard Muybridge’s initial motion photography experiments in 1877 to the 1997 silent film The Taxi Dancer. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-214 The Art of the Documentary
3 Credits

This course explores the history of documentary film by considering major directors, aesthetics, and social contexts. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with a history of the development of documentary film from its roots in 19th-century art forms to its role in current events, to examine various styles and techniques of documentary and to analyze the contribution of the documentary as a persuasive means of communication to achieve social and political goals. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-215 History of Avant-Garde Film
3 Credits

This course is an interdisciplinary study of the history of avant-garde film. Works include documentary, experimental, and autobiographical film, travelogues, archival newsreels, animation, and other forms of nonfiction cinema. Students will study the traditions, aesthetics, influences, and historical content of these films as a viable form of creative cinema. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-216 History of Animated Film
3 Credits

This course is an interdisciplinary study of the history of animated film and will focus on the visual language, genres, and social attitudes of animated film. Major films and significant directors will be covered. This is a detailed critical guide to several animated motion picture projects from Eadweard Muybridge’s initial motion photography experiments in 1877 to modern 3D film today. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-217 The History of Science Fiction Film
3 Credits
Science fiction movies have entertained us, frightened us, and made us think of all kinds of possible problems and opportunities in the universe. This course will look at the history of such films and will include some of the underlying themes about society and politics. We will watch, discuss, and research some of the most serious–and some of the silliest–sci-fi films produced. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-218 Introduction to Film and Literature
3 Credits (Literature/Arts/Humanities Core)

Introduction to Film and Literature is a comparative study of films and the literary sources upon which they are based, with special attention given to basic differences between genres. Students are introduced to the formalist conventions and characteristics, terms and concepts, and critical theory of film and literature in order to master skills in interpretation, analysis, and critical evaluation. The course explores a variety of styles, periods, and forms, but individual sections of the course may focus on a genre, topic, or theme. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ENGL-218.

FILM-219 Film and the Media
3 Credits

This course is a study of the media as a subject of film, as it has been depicted both seriously and satirically in movies dealing with the newspaper business, with radio, with television, with the political process, and with the reporting and ethics that go with these industries. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-220 The Films of Woody Allen
3 Credits

Woody Allen’s long career as a writer, director and performer makes him a prime candidate for cinematic analysis. This course will focus on his philosophical obsessions and also his distinctive working methods. Readings include biographical and critical studies. Students will have the opportunity to sharpen their analytical skills by writing essays about individual films. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-222 History of Horror Films
3 Credits

This course is an interdisciplinary study of the history and film art of the horror film during the twentieth century. The course will cover several themes of the horror genre; these will include the vampire, werewolf, Frankenstein, and the ghost story. The student will view and analyze the older classic films and compare them to more current ones that were produced on the same theme. The student will analyze these films from a historical perspective as well as the artistic and technical, including an examination of the acting, directing, scenery, music, and cinematography of the art form. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-223 Writing for Screen Narrative
3 Credits

This course will teach the strategies and means to develop and execute narrative scripts with the primary focus on the short form narrative film. Emphasis is placed on the student’s increasing ability to employ the tools of the craft, including but not limited to: story structure, mythic structure, plot, characterization, dialogue, format, story editing and revision. Conventional scriptwriting techniques will be covered as well as critical approaches to understanding these techniques. Elements of the feature film form will be studied, extrapolated and applied to shorter forms as well. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as TVRD-223 and ENGL-223.

FILM-225 Film Noir
3 Credits

This course will explore the literary and cinematic world of film noir, a critical term that refers to certain American films of the 1940s and 1950s and to American detective fiction of the same period, so called roman noir. The class will examine classic, cinematic examples of the genre of film noir, read a number of canonical detective novels, and investigate the historical context out of which the fiction and films emerged. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-226 The Western
3 Credits

This course will explore the literary and cinematic world of the Western, a film genre set primarily in the latter half of the 19th century in the American Old West. The class will examine classic, cinematic examples of the genre of westerns, read related examples of Western literature (from pulp novels to short stories to literary fiction), and investigate both the historical context out of which the fiction and films emerged and the cultural influences at the time of publication or production. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-240 Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Films
3 Credits

This course is an interdisciplinary study of the history of gay, lesbian, and transgender issues in film. Using lecture, interactive discussion, guest speakers, readings and multimedia, this course aims to stimulate critical thinking about gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender or intersex issues in the framework of American culture, ethics and public interest. Major films and significant directors will be covered. (3 hours weekly)

FILM-251 Shakespeare from Page to Screen
3 Credits (Literature/Arts/Humanities Core)

This course focuses on reading, analyzing and interpreting Shakespeare’s plays as they have been adapted to film, and understanding them as products of specific historical, cultural and artistic currents, as performance text meant for production within the constraints of the medium of film. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-251 and ENGL-251.

FILM-260 Film and Philosophy
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

An exploration and comparison of philosophical approaches explored within the art form of film. Focus is on major theories of reality (metaphysics), knowledge (epistemology) and value (axiology) and on the canons of film studies. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PHIL-260.

FILM-270 Women and Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

An interdisciplinary study of women in film, this course will review a wide variety of movies written and/or directed by women, featuring women, and dealing with women’s issues. This course draws on the arts, media, and popular culture in examining the impact of gender expectations on shaping societal roles. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as WMST-270.


FINANCIAL PLANNING

FNPL-101 Personal Financial Planning Principles
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course focuses on the knowledge and skills needed to manage and/or improve your personal financial literacy; that is, how you manage your own finances. Major topics will include concepts such as investing, debt control, tax planning, credit management, insurance, management of critical problems such as bankruptcy and foreclosures, as well as retirement and estate planning. Students will be given several opportunities to apply their knowledge in both individual and small group assignments and activities, and will explore the use of electronic resources that support financial planning activities. (3 hours weekly)

FNPL-105 Financial Planning for Young Adults
3 Credits

This course is designed, in general, for those less than 30 years of age who are interested in learning how to plan for a financially secure future by practical applications in the following areas: money management, spending and savings plans, credit/debt management, and investing for the future. (3 hours weekly)

FNPL-106 Credit Management
3 Credits

This course provides financial literacy skills and resources in consumer areas such as credit and money management, avoidance of financial traps, restoration of impaired credit, financial institutions’ credit worthiness decision-making, home ownership and preservation, and the selection of appropriate sources of credit. It will involve both theory and application. Prerequisite: FNPL-101 or 105. (3 hours weekly)

FNPL-108 Financial Planning for Retirement
3 Credits

This course is designed to deliver an understanding of the fundamental elements used to design a retirement plan strategy. Students will learn to review an individual financial situation, develop financial goals for retirement and appropriate means to achieve those goals, and to identify and manage the various risks to that plan during the accumulation and payout phases. ‘Decoding’ of Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid, and lifestyle choice options will also be included. The emotional, relationship-changing impact of the retirement decision will also be explored. Prerequisite: FNPL-101. (3 hours weekly)

FNPL-110 Estate Planning and Elder Law
3 Credits
This course will explore the complexities of financial planning for later years of life. Course activities will focus on specifics in the field of elder law and estate planning, and will include such items as basic legal concepts of elder law, relocation decisions, long term care insurance issues, future changes to Maryland tax laws, the challenges of joint ownership, and wills. Prerequisite: FNPL-101. (3 hours weekly)

FNPL-201 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Selection
3 Credits
Upon the completion of this course a student will understand the variety of investment vehicles which are offered today. He/she will better self-advise or advise others in financial investments in the following areas: long-term securities; stocks and bonds; limited income securities; treasury bills; mutual funds. An overview of analytical techniques, construction of investment portfolio and tax considerations will be presented as well. (3 hours weekly)

FNPL-202 Risk Management and Insurance
3 Credits

An introduction to the field of insurance. The student will examine the various types of risks and the approaches taken by insurance firms. The course provides an analysis of life, health, property and liability insurance, fire insurance, homeowners and personal auto policies, as well as employee benefit plans and determination of insurance needs. (3 hours weekly)

FNPL-206 Banking and Financial Planning
3 Credits
As an introduction to banking essentials, this course will present many aspects of the field, from legal issues and ethical concerns such as privacy, consumer lending, and the role of the Federal Reserve as agent and bank regulator to contemporary concerns such as loan maintenance and foreclosure negotiations. Non-deposit bank services such as investments & trusts will also be explored. Prerequisites: BMGT-100 and FNPL-101. (3 hours weekly)

FNPL-210 Financial Planning Seminar
1 Credit

This course is designed to be a project-oriented, capstone course for the financial planning curriculum. It will combine all major program concepts into an individualized application, such as: preparation of a comprehensive financial plan; a workplace internship; deeper exploration of one aspect of personal financial planning; or other similar items. A written and oral report will serve as the project outcome. Prerequisites: BMGT-205 and FNPL-206. (1 hour weekly)


FINE ARTS

FINE-101 Humanities Through the Arts
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

In this course, the humanities are approached through an interdisciplinary study of nine major arts: film, theatre, music, dance, painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, and art in literature. Each of these arts is considered from the perspectives of the meaning and form expressed as well as criticism or critical evaluation. As a study of the creative process a broad range of methods in the various arts will be explored through diverse presentations by guest lecturers, professionals in the arts. The challenge to the student in this course is to develop perceptual awareness and aesthetic sensitivity as well as a foundation for a life-long relationship with the arts regardless of his/her major field of study. (3 hours weekly)

FINE-102 Arts, Cultures, and Ideas
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Arts, Cultures and Ideas is an interdisciplinary course whose purpose is to introduce to the student how the humanities and their arts address ways of thinking about what is human about our diverse histories and cultures, imaginations, values, words, and dreams. The approach of the course is to root cultural achievements in their historical settings, showing how the political, social, and economic events of each period influence their creation. The course will focus on at least three of the following areas of the humanities appropriate to the period of history and the specific culture being studied: architecture, criticism, dance, ethics, film, literature, music, painting, philosophy, photography, religion, sculpture, and theatre. Historical periods that will be a part of this course as it changes focus and individual cultures to be studied within these periods will be determined each semester. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

FINE-103 Introduction to the Creative Arts
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course will introduce the students to the basic elements, principles, processes, materials, and inherent artistic qualities of theater, music, dance, and the visual arts. Focus is on experiential learning using a creative dramatics approach. The course is geared toward students planning to work with elementary-age children as teachers, caregivers, and others specializing in child development. This course is a requirement for all transfer students pursuing the AAT Elementary Education degree. (3 hours weekly)

FINE-114 History and Culture of Hip-Hop
3 Credits

This course will expose students to the elements of Hip-Hop culture, including graffiti, emceeing, deejaying, and dance forms like locking, popping, and b-boying. The influence of West African culture will be discussed as will Hip-Hop’s American roots, its development and history, and its influence on American and world culture. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as DANC-114.

FINE-193 Introduction to Women’s Studies: Women, Art, and Culture
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

An introduction to the ideas and issues central to Women’s Studies, feminism, gender and diversity with emphasis on women’s art and culture. The course will examine how women have been represented and how gender has been constructed in the dominant culture as well as the role of the arts and of women themselves in developing an alternative women’s culture. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as WMST-193.

FINE-200 Twentieth Century Arts, Cultures and Ideas - Rouse
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This Rouse Scholars honors course is an interdisciplinary course, the purpose of which is to introduce the student to the ways of thinking about what is human about our diverse histories and cultures, imaginations, values, and words. Specifically, this course will focus on how the arts of the twentieth century from the turn of the century through postmodernism reflect the diverse cultures and human values of this unique period in history. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)


FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE

FYEX-100 First Year Experience
2 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

First Year Experience 100 engages students in a highly interactive, critical thinking experience and in a meta-cognitive pursuit to understand themselves as intentional learners and as civic and global citizens. Through self-assessment, reading, writing, and reflection, students develop habits of mind necessary to engage in academic inquiry, creative and critical thinking, and scholarly discourse with integrity and civility; develop their ability to articulate their long-term goals as related to their own beliefs and values; and strengthen their capacity to appreciate diversity and effective intercultural and interpersonal communication. ESL sections of the course provide international students with an essential and unique orientation to and understanding of the American higher education system, culture, and technology. (2 hours weekly)


FRENCH

FREN-101 Elementary French I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare French-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the French language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the French language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

FREN-102 Elementary French II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare French-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the French language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the French language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

FREN-201 Intermediate French I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of French-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the French language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the French language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

FREN-202 Intermediate French II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in complex structures and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of French-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the French language to other relevant disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the French language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

FREN-206 French Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary French society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to trace the history of film in France, and show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical and cultural realities of France from the dawn of cinema in the early 1900s to the present, with special emphasis on the French New Wave movement with reference to some major French directors (Truffaut, Renoir, Godard) and their influential works. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-206.


GEOGRAPHY

GEOG-101 Introduction to World Geography
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

This course will focus on the effects of spatial relationships on the earth’s human population. We will study the location of people, relative to each other. The student will examine the physical environment and how it influences spatial decision-making processes. We will analyze the geo-economic relationships which influence the earth’s settlement patterns. The student will develop an understanding of the increasingly interdependent and interconnected world in which we live, and the relationship between the actions of the individual and the impact which these actions have on other places in the world. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

GEOG-102 Elements of Cultural Geography
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

In Cultural Geography the student will be able to demonstrate how the surface of the earth has been changing during the time span of human occupancy and how, in using that surface, human technology has grown and prospered. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

GEOG-201 Economic Geography
3 Credits
This course will focus on the interdependence and interrelationships of the global economy. We will study the location of economic activity at the local, national and world scale. We will examine the distribution of economic activity, the use of the world’s resources, and the spatial organization and evolution of the world economy. The student will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the issues of pollution and resource depletion, food and famine, accessibility and isolation, land use, production processes, economic development, and global trade relationships. Prerequisite: GEOG-101 or GEOG-102. (3 hours weekly)


GEOLOGY

GEOL-107 Introduction to Physical Geology
3 Credits (Science Core)

This course is designed as an introduction to the composition and structure of the earth, its rocks and minerals, surface erosional and depositional features, and the agents that form them. Topics include plate tectonics, volcanoes, weathering and erosion, earthquakes, streams and groundwater, glaciers, shorelines, faults and geologic structures. For Introduction to Physical Geology Laboratory, see GEOL-117. (3 hours weekly)

GEOL-108 Historical Geology
3 Credits (Science Core)

This is a course in which the principles of physical geology and stratigraphy are used to study the history of the earth and its inhabitants. Geologic features such as rocks and fossils are used to interpret and date past events. The formations and geologic periods of North America will be emphasized. (3 hours weekly)

GEOL-115 Regional Geology
4 Credits

Regional Geology is a course which examines the major geological provinces of North America with regard to their topographic features and major rock structures. Basic concepts of phys­i­cal and/or historical geology will be further ­developed to provide students with better understanding of geological processes in their present day expression. An emphasis will be placed on the local provinces of Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Four field trips are planned to study the geological features of the local provinces. Prerequisite: GEOL-107. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

GEOL-117 Introduction to Physical Geology Lab
1 Credit (Science Core)

In this course, students will utilize the basic materials and tools of physical geology to identify common minerals and rocks. Students will learn to recognize surface erosional and depositional features on aerial photographs and topographic maps, and will interpret geologic faults and structures on geologic maps and models. There will be several field trips to local sites. Pre- or corequisite: GEOL-107. (3 hours lab weekly)

GEOL-118 Historical Geology Laboratory
1 Credit (Science Core)

In this laboratory course, students will analyze rock and fossil data, and apply the basic principles of stratigraphy to reconstruct geologic events. Geologic maps and cross-sections illustrating the geologic provinces of North America will be interpreted. There will be several field trips to local sites. Pre- or corequisite: GEOL-108. (3 hours lab weekly)


GERMAN

GERM-101 Elementary German I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare German-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the German language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the German language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

GERM-102 Elementary German II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare German-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the German language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the German language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

GERM-201 Intermediate German I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)
In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of German-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the German language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the German language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

GERM-202 Intermediate German II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in complex structures and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of German-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the German language to other relevant disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the German language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

GERM-207 German Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary German society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within Germany from the 1900s to the present. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-207.


GREEK

GREK-101 Elementary Modern Greek I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this introductory course, students learn to listen, speak, write and read at a beginning level. They also learn about the diverse cultures of the Greek-speaking world. Students will become familiar with the Greek script and sound system, develop a working vocabulary, and learn rudimentary grammatical concepts. (4 hours weekly)

GREK-102 Elementary Modern
Greek II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In GREK-102, students review Greek letters isolated/connected forms; continue to create simple sentences using gender, plurals, pronouns, possession, verb forms, past and present tense, geographic place names, and the counting system through the introduction of meaningful vocabulary. Students will increase their proficiency in Greek script and sound system, widen their working vocabulary, learn key grammatical points, practice conversation and expand their knowledge of Greek culture. (4 hours weekly)


HEALTH CARE

HEAL-105 Drug Calculations
1 Credit
Students will develop skills in the metric, apothecary and household systems of measurement. Drug calculation problems will provide the student with the opportunity to practice conversions between systems. Students will perform the computations necessary to administer medications in liquid, tablet, and capsule form. Prerequisite: MATH-060 or appropriate score on math placement test. (2 hours weekly for 7 weeks) NOTE: Also listed as MATH-105.

HEAL-108 Developing Professional Behaviors
2 Credits

Health care has undergone significant changes and faced many challenges in the past few decades. The allied health care provider must be adept at meeting the needs of the complex system and the client population using new technology as well as traditional skills of patient care. This course offers allied health care providers the opportunity to acquire skills and expertise in the concepts that influence professional practice and delivery of care. The course focuses on preparing the student to be an integral member of the healthcare system, providing the student with tools to communicate, verbally and in writing, with staff, peers, patients and their families and developing student skills to succeed in the academic and work setting including creating an appropriate self care system. (2 hours weekly)

HEAL-110 The Health Care Professional
2 Credits

The role of the health care professional is explored and includes an overview of careers in the health care system. Common issues to be studied include environmental health concerns, infection control, legal and ethical trends and professional responsibility. A major focus will include medical terminology and application of professional practices to both hospital and pre-hospital environments. Communication skills will include the effect of interpersonal relationships and the impact of working with diverse populations. Computerization and the use of technology in the health care field will be explored. (2 hours weekly)


HEALTH EDUCATION

HEED-100 Introduction to Lifetime Fitness
1 Credit (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is designed to provide the student with the principles and methods necessary to maintaining personal fitness and health. The concept of wellness, and the roles of physical fitness, nutrition, weight management, and stress play in personal wellness development are examined. Participation in labs, classroom activities, and take-home assignments will assist the student in evaluating their personal fitness levels as well as developing a strategy for improvement. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-101  Health and the World of Risk
1 Credit (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will introduce students to the world of risk behavior as it relates to personal health. Through the examination of health and risk theory students will better understand why individuals make seemingly irrational and often dangerous decisions related to their personal health. Some of the familiar themes that will be explored include sexual risk taking, drug use and abuse, nutrition and others. Students will participate in the development and implementation of a campus health event during this course. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-102 Introduction to Weight Management
1 Credit (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and means for developing a personal weight control plan. The course will examine commercial diet programs, fad diets, and effective weight loss strategies. Students will study the role body composition and weight have in health/wellness. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-104 Personal Nutrition Assessment
1 Credit (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

Students are introduced to a computerized nutritional assessment program. Students evaluate their current nutritional status and develop strategies for improvement. Various group discussions, lectures, and labs provide students with the means to critically evaluate their dietary practices. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-105 Pediatric Basic Life Support Plus
1 Credit

This course is designed to prepare students to recognize and intervene appropriately in situations requiring infant and child CPR or management of foreign body airway obstruction in the conscious or unconscious victim. This course includes techniques to be used for victims from birth to 8 years of age. Recognition of potential safety hazards, water safety, and accident prevention are also discussed. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-106 Introduction to Stress Management
1 Credit (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the concepts of stress management and the application of these concepts to personal stress management. Students will be presented with various tools and strategies for managing stress and will use these to develop an individual stress management plan. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-108 Adult CPR and First Aid
1 Credit
This course is designed to acquaint students with theories and techniques of CPR and First Aid and Safety. After the successful completion of this course a two-year card from the American Heart Association in Adult CPR and a three-year certification in First Aid and Safety from the National Safety Council will be awarded. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-109 Basic CPR and First Aid
2 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is designed to acquaint students with theories and techniques of CPR and First Aid and Safety. After the successful completion of this course a one-year card will be awarded in Infant, Child and Adult CPR (valid one year) and certification in First Aid and Safety (valid three years). (2 hours weekly)

HEED-110 Introduction to Personal Wellness
1 Credit (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the components of wellness. These components will include stress, physical fitness, nutrition, safety, and weight management. The principles, concepts, and practices necessary to improve one’s personal wellness will be examined. Students will participate in presentations, laboratories, and assessments designed to evaluate their individual wellness plan to improve areas of concern. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-112 First Aid and Safety
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

A study of techniques of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including one- and two-person rescue for infants, children and adults and use of resuscitation mask, BVM and AED in emergency situations. This course will prepare you to make appropriate decisions regarding first aid care and to act on those decisions. Students will be eligible to receive CPR and First Aid Certification. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-113 Drug Use and Abuse
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will examine drug use relevant to the use and abuse of drugs. Upon completion of this course the student will be able to identify the physiological, psychological, social and cultural implications of drug use. In addition the historical and legal aspects of drug use will be presented in the context of this course. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-114 Introduction to Therapeutic Massage
3 Credits

This course is designed to explore fundamental topics in the use of therapeutic massage and its role in the wellness model of the healthcare system. The history of massage will be introduced and relevant research into the validity of this modality will be discussed. The ethical and professional standards for massage therapists are presented as well as workplace standards, professional alliances, and practice management issues. Time will also be devoted to discussions of massage manipulations, bodywork techniques, the purpose of touch and emerging trends in the field. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-115 Personal and Community Health
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will synthesize the important facts and concepts of a variety of college level courses including biology, physiology, anatomy, ecology, psychology, and sociology into a meaningful dialogue that will motivate the student to modify their health practices to a high level of effective and enjoyable living. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-116 Fundamentals of Spiritual Awareness
3 Credits

This course, based on Eastern thought, will provide the student the opportunity to understand one’s spiritual nature. Major topics include states of consciousness, the subconscious mind, thoughts and attitudes, death and dying. Students will learn the connection between the chakras (energy body) and the physical body. Various meditation and visualization techniques will be experienced. Upon completion of this course the student will gain a fuller understanding and connection with intuition and self-awareness. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PHIL-116.

HEED-117 Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Professional
1 Credit

This course is designed to acquaint students with theories and techniques of Basic Life Support for the Healthcare Professional. After the successful completion of this course, a two-year card from the American Heart Association in Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers will be awarded. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-118 Introduction to Pharmacology
1 Credit

This course introduces the student to the important basic concepts of pharmacology. Major drug classifications will be described. The focus will be the discussion of applications of drug therapy. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-120 Medical Aspects of Chemical Dependency
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify concepts relevant to alcoholism and the medical aspects of addiction. In addition, the course will include the pharmacology of alcohol and other addictive substances. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HUMS-120.

HEED-121 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Treatment
3 Credits

This course provides students with the opportunity to study the various modalities of addiction therapy. Counseling skills and the philosophical aspects of addiction will also be presented in this course. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HUMS-121.

HEED-122 Individual Counseling Techniques
3 Credits

This course will make available for use clinical methods that attend both to developing diagnostic understanding and to implementing treatment skills with mental health and/or chemically abusing/dependent populations. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HUMS-122.

HEED-123 Group Counseling Skills
3 Credits

Students will receive training in a group-counseling model for use with both mental health and chemically abusing/dependent clients. The emphasis will fall on the group, client and counselor contributions to the group process, and how these factors influence and interrelate with one another. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HUMS-123.

HEED-124 Family Counseling Skills
3 Credits

The family is defined as a complex interactive system. Traditional views of pathology will be redefined as students come to view family problems such as substance abuse, mental abuse, and other psychosocial problems. Students will think diagnostically about families utilizing theory and various techniques, strategies, and approaches that are relevant to working with families. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HUMS-124.

HEED-125 Ethics in Professional Practice
3 Credits

This course will examine ethics in today’s evolving healthcare environment. This course will look at the evolution of privacy and the ethical dilemmas that result from current laws, social and cultural implications. A practitioner’s approach to ethics has a direct impact on the quality of patient care and the liability of the organization for which they work. Healthcare practitioners, i.e., substance abuse counselors, psychiatric aides, gerontologists, social services workers, are expected to be knowledgeable about today’s healthcare laws and ethical codes. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-130 Human Sexuality
3 Credits

Through this introduction to the field of human sexuality, the student will be able to recall and describe his­torical and current research knowledge related to physiological, psychological, anthropological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality across the life span. Students will discuss and evaluate their own beliefs and values relevant to the topics of various types of sexual behavior, sexual problems and their treatments. In addition, the student will be able to describe important legal and ethical sexual issues. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as SOCI-130.

HEED-131 Introduction to Foot Reflexology
1 Credit

This course is designed to introduce the student to the art and science of foot reflexology. Class discussion will include foot reflexology as energy therapy, a component of CAM (complimentary and alternative medicine). This course will define, explain the history, and describe how foot reflexology works. Students will learn and experience pressure techniques unique to reflexology. A thorough understanding of zone therapy, reflex areas of major organs and glands, and foot reflexology’s role in maintaining optimal wellness will be emphasized. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-132 The History and Practice of Reiki
1 Credit

This course integrates the concepts and theory of Reiki with hands-on practice and an appreciation of the spirit. Students will be exposed to underlying philosophy of this healing tradition originating in Japan. Healing practices grounded in energy medicine such as Reiki require a different way of knowing. The influences of energy, spirit and the body are explored as being foundational for successful therapeutic intervention. This process draws directly on the unique connection between the healer and the client. The History and Practice of Reiki will be used to introduce practitioners to self-treatment, treatment of others, and the understanding of energy, spirit, and body connection. Students will be prepared for Reiki I certification. (1 hour weekly)

HEED-135 Introduction to Holistic Health
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student an understanding of Holistic Health. Class participants will define and examine holistic health, CAM (complementary and alternative medicine), allopathic, and integrative medicine. Students will explore the five major types of CAM: alternative medical systems, mind-body interventions, biologically based treatments, manipulative and body-based methods, and energy therapies. Through discussion, lecture, participation, research, and guest speakers the student will demonstrate comprehension of holistic health and the role CAM, allopathic medicine and the patient have in maintaining health. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-136 Introduction to Energy Therapies
3 Credits

This course is designed to expose students to the foundation of energy medicine. Energy therapies are the basis of a growing number of Eastern and Western healing approaches that are used to promote health, healing and well-being. It combines scientific and rational knowledge with intuitive understanding of energy in the body and in the environment. Working with the body’s energy, students will use various energy therapy practices to explore the concept of healing and disease prevention. Upon completion of the course students will have an understanding of how multisensory experiences redefine what and how we know our bodies and the healing process. Consumers of health care are increasingly savvy about the benefits of complimentary approaches to health care. Health care providers need to be in the best position to support consumer exploration of complimentary and alternative approaches as well as engage in practices that promote vital health and optimal well-being. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-140 The Philosophy and Practice of Tai Chi
3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the philosophical, historical, and technical bases of Tai Chi. Students will be taught and will develop the skills necessary to perform the Sun Style form of Tai Chi. (4 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PHIL-140.

HEED-141 The Philosophy and Practice of Yoga
3 Credits

This introductory course in Yogic philosophy is unique in that it interweaves the intellectual and the experiential, so that the ancient yet timely truths and principles of Yoga are studied, explored, and practiced through Yoga postures, breath, awareness, reflection, writing, discussion, meditation, and action. (4 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PHIL‑141.

HEED-150 Women’s Health
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
This course will introduce students to a variety of women’s health issues as well as the barriers faced by women striving to achieve a healthful lifestyle. Students will examine topics including: female sexual health and reproduction, exercise and eating behaviors, substance abuse, mental health and stress, and violence against women. This course is designed to support students in their personal exploration of attitudes, knowledge and values related to women’s health and to assist them as they analyze their personal health behaviors. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as WMST-150.

HEED-155 Introduction to Conflict Resolution: Science and Art
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
The purpose of “Introduction to Conflict Resolution: Science and Art” is to introduce students to both different perspectives on conflict and different strategies for resolving conflict. Conflict will be explored in different contexts, including intergroup conflict, cross-cultural conflict, and international conflict, with an emphasis on interpersonal conflict. Most importantly, students will be asked to reflect on their own style of conflict resolution and the pertinence of the material covered to conflict resolution in their own lives. Course content will include experiential learning and role play. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as CRES-155.

HEED-200 Health/Fitness Leader
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This class is designed to provide the student who is interested in the wellness field with the knowledge and skills necessary to function as an exercise/fitness leader. The class covers core behavioral objectives set up for the following certifications: American College of Sports Medicine’s Exercise Leader, the National Strength and Conditioning’s Certified Personal Trainer, and the American Council for Exercise Personal Trainer. Students will be introduced to various aspects of the exercise/fitness field including risk factor evaluation, fitness assessment, exercise prescription, and program development. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-210 Foundations of Health Education and Health Behavior
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will examine the scientific and philosophical bases for various theories of health, including health, wellness, individual control and limitations of health status, and holistic health. Also examined will be the psychological, social psychological, and sociological approaches to the following health areas: development of health attitudes and behavior, patient-provider interaction and the organization of health care. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-212 Current Health Issues
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will examine issues and trends relevant to consumer health decisions. Environmental health, the health care system and mental health are topics included in the course. Upon completion of the course the student will be able to identify current consumer health issues related to health of the nation. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-213 Stress Management
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is designed to provide the student with the principles and methods necessary to developing a personal stress management plan as well as experience various means of stress reduction and relaxation. The concept of wellness, and the role stress and stress management play in personal wellness development are examined. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-216 Health Care in the US
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the impact of current legislative regulations on the health care delivery system, the effect of economics on treatment choices, and an exploration of issues in Medicaid and Medicare. The course includes an overview of the health care system and an examination of the medical infrastructure with a historical perspective. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-218 Organizational Management in Health Care
3 Credits

This course offers an understanding of the skills needed for a new breed of clinically trained managers. Students learn about the health care environment, the classic definition of the manager’s function (planning, organizing, decision making, staffing, and controlling), and practical skills for managing in the health care environment. An emphasis is placed on case studies, presentations, and other exercises to reinforce the classroom learning. Prerequisite: ENGL-121 or ENGL‑101. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-220 Crisis Intervention
3 Credits

Learn the basics of Crisis Intervention within the global arena and how it affects all of us. You will also learn how to understand, interpret and work with crisis within our own lives and those of family and friends. This class will explore the affects of suicide, alcohol/drug abuse, child abuse, crisis in the workplace and in the school setting and posttraumatic stress disorder. (3 hours weekly)

HEED-227 Cross-Cultural Community Health Service and Learning Practicum
3 Credits

The community service and learning practicum provides the opportunity for students to serve in a community health agency. Through community health education these agencies address important and current cross-cultural and/or international health issues, such as AIDS outreach, disease prevention, and wellness education. The goal of the practicum is to develop practical and professional skills in the creation, implementation and evaluation of programs designed to enhance the health of the population. Each student is assigned to a community health agency for eight hours weekly. A two-hour on-campus seminar is scheduled every other week. (9 hours lab weekly)

HEED-230 Health and the Disease Process
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of general pathophysiology of disease processes. It is designed for students enrolled in health programs and those interested in pursuing an advanced degree in the medical/allied health fields. Causes, signs and symptoms, incidence, treatment, and patient teaching are presented. Interventions to prevent disease and promote wellness are integrated into clinical situations. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PUBH-230.

HEED-240 Death and Dying
3 Credits

This course discusses issues of death, dying, and bereavement from the perspectives of psychology, sociology, religion, spirituality, and culture. Topics include attitudes towards death; suicide; euthanasia; hospice movement and end-of-life care; working with people who have terminal illnesses; bereavement counseling; the funeral business; how religions understand death; and psychology of death. Students become more aware about the cultural implications of death, dying, and bereavement, and reflect on their own values and attitudes toward life and death. Prerequiste: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) Note: Also listed as HMDV-240.
HEBREW

HBRW-101 Elementary Hebrew I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Modern Hebrew-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Modern Hebrew language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Modern Hebrew language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

HBRW-102 Elementary Hebrew II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Modern Hebrew-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Modern Hebrew language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Modern Hebrew language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

HBRW-201 Intermediate Hebrew I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Modern Hebrew-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Modern Hebrew language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Modern Hebrew language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

HBRW-202 Intermediate Hebrew II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in complex structures and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Modern Hebrew-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Modern Hebrew language to other relevant disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Modern Hebrew language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)


HINDI

HNDI-101 Elementary Hindi I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Hindi-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Hindi language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Hindi language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

HNDI-102 Elementary Hindi II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by  exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Hindi-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Hindi language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Hindi language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

HNDI-201 Intermediate Hindi I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at an intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Indian cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Hindi language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Hindi language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)


HISTORY

HIST-111 American History to 1877
3 Credits (History/Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

As a result of having taken this course, the student will be able to describe the major political, diplomatic, economic, and social developments from the fifteenth century through the Reconstruction period. In particular, the student will study the Red, Black and White cultures of pre-Revolutionary America; the American Revolution and the development of American republicanism; the Transportation Revolution and the emergence of a market economy; territorial expansion and wars; 1783-1860; antebellum reformers; Civil War, 1861-1865; Reconstruction, 1865-1877. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-112 American History Since 1877
3 Credits (History/Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

As a result of having taken this course, the student will be able to describe the major political, diplomatic, economic, and social developments in American history from the end of the Reconstruction period to the present. In particular, the student will study: the rise of industrial capitalism, the mechanization of agriculture; the end of the frontier and the wars with the Native-Americans; immigration; urbanization; the changing role of the family; the history of women; the history of African-Americans; the political party system; the Populist, Progressive and New Deal reforms; the impact of the New Deal on current domestic politics; and the impact of World War II and the Cold War on American Foreign Policy. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-121 The Ancient World: Prehistory to the Middle Ages
3 Credits (History/Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be able to describe the history and development of early world civilizations through the 13th century. The student will be able to identify and analyze the major political, economic, and intellectual movements that influenced these civilizations. The student will be able to analyze and discuss, from primary and secondary sources, the impact Middle Eastern, Asian, African, and Classical cultures had on Western Civilization. This course was formerly HIST-101. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-122 Western Civilization and the Pre-Modern World
3 Credits (History/Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be able to describe the major features of the development of western civilization and its relationship to non-western cultures from the late Middle Ages to 1815. The course will include the use of primary and secondary sources to focus on social, economic, political, and cultural factors influencing the relationship of western and non-western societies. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-123 Western Civilization and the Modern World
3 Credits (History/Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be able to describe the history and development of Western Civilization and its impact on the world from 1815 to the present. The student will identify and analyze the political, economic and intellectual movements that influenced the Western European mind. The student will examine the character of the evolving modern nation state system through the wars of unification, overseas expansion, and the competitive national rivalries. The student will evaluate the underlying factors influencing the events that shaped the modern world, including two World Wars and the Cold War. The student will examine how the post-1945 conditions affect the attitudes and makeup of the former colonial world. This course was formerly HIST-102. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-200 History of Maryland
3 Credits

As a result of having taken this course, the student will be able to describe and critically evaluate the major developments in the history of Maryland and Howard County from colonial times to the present. The student will also be able to examine the major primary source materials used in the study of local history. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-201 Europe in the Twentieth Century
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be able to describe the political, economic, intellectual and cultural development in Europe beginning with the events and conditions that led to the breakdown of European stability and World War I. The student will examine the diplomatic maneuverings of the Peace of Paris and its consequences, the roots and impacts of the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia and the evolution and development of totalitarianism in Germany and Italy. The student will also explain the origins, events, and results of World War II, the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Empire, and the quest for a united Europe. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-202 Issues in History
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

This course is designed to allow students to study the historical background to current social, economic, cultural, and political issues. The specific topic, which may change from semester to semester, will be selected by the history faculty based on current events that are in the public consciousness. The thrust of this course is to offer students the historical basis for timely issues and events. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-205 A History of Race and Ethnicity in the United States
3 Credits
This course focuses on a “neglected dimension” in American History and society, namely the study of the diverse racial and ethnic and other non-traditional communities in the United States. The impact of the Anglo-core culture on our political, religious and economic institutions - Democracy, Protestantism, Capitalism - is the major frame of reference. Assimilationist and power conflict sociological models are applied to white, ethnic, Native-American, African­American, Hispanic-American and Asian- American groups. Immigration policies and hatred towards diverse groups are studied from historical and contemporary perspectives. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-208 History of Africa
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)
The student will be able to describe the major features of the development of Africa’s history from prehistoric times up to the formation of modern African nation states. The course will include a detailed study of Africa’s geography and its impact on Africa’s cultures. The student will be able to analyze the major trends of Africa’s history; early cultures and civilizations, spread of Christianity and Islam, early European contacts, impact of neo-imperialism, decolonization following World War II, and the current status of African nation states. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-209 History of the Middle East
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be able to describe the historical development of the Near East from the earliest major civilizations through the twentieth century. This will include the spread of the Roman Empire and Christianity, the rise and spread of Islam, the impact of the Ottoman Empire, the division of the “Middle East” following World War I, and current religious, political, and international challenges of the area. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-210 History of Latin America
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be able to describe the political, economic, cultural and social development of Latin America from prehistoric time up to the present day. The course will include a detailed study of Latin America’s geography and its impact on Latin American cultures. The student will be able to analyze the major trends of Latin American history, early cultures and civilizations, spread of European contacts, impact of European conquest and colonization, and the development of independent Latin American nation-states. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-211 Asian Civilization - China, Japan and Korea
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

This study of East Asian history will focus on the interaction of China with Japan, Korea, and the West. It will enable students to gain a perspective from an Asian point of view rather than a western one. Students will concentrate on events in the 18th, 19th, and 20th Centuries. At the end of the course, they will be able to describe major political, economic, social, and intellectual developments in the Pacific region. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-213 History of Modern Russia
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be introduced to the history and development of the modern state of Russia from the establishment of the Romanov dynasty through the Revolution of 1917 to Stalin, Perestroika and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-215 Celtic Ireland
3 Credits

The student will be able to describe the history and development of Ireland from the Celtic settlements to the Cromwellian occupation. The student will be able to evaluate the impact and response of native Irish society and culture to Celtic, Christian, Norse, Anglo-Saxon and British influences. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-216 History of the Indian Subcontinent
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences/Interdisciplinary Core)

This course will cover the major features of the development of the Indian subcontinent’s history from prehistoric times up to the formation of the modern nation states. The course will include a detailed study of the subcontinent’s geography and its impact on its various cultures, to include India, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, and Nepal. The course will focus on the major historical trends, such as early cultures and civilizations, spread of Buddhism. Hinduism and Islam, early European contacts, impact of neo-imperialism, decolonization following World War II, and the current status of the various nation-states. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-218 History of Southeast Asia
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences/Interdisciplinary Core)

This course covers the major features of the development of Southeast Asia’s history from prehistoric times up to the formation of modern nation states of the area. The course will include a detailed study of Southeast Asia’s geography and its impact on the area’s cultures. The course will cover the major trends of Southeast Asia’s history; early cultures and civilizations, spread of Christianity and Islam, early European contacts, impact of neo-imperialism, World War II, decolonization following World War II, and the current status of Southeast Asian nation states. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-219 History of Australia and the Pacific Rim
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences/Interdisciplinary Core)

This course covers the major features of the development of Australia and the Pacific Rim’s history from prehistoric times up to the current events of the area. The course will include a detailed study of that entire area’s geography and its impact on the area’s cultures, and the major trends of the area’s history; early cultures and the early European contacts, European colonization of the area, impact of neo-imperialism, World War II, and relative independence following World War II, and the current status of relationships among the various areas and the world at large. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-221 American History Since 1945
3 Credits

The student will study the major political, economic, social and cultural trends from the end of World War II to the present. In particular, students will focus on the origins, implementation, and the end of our Cold War foreign policies as well as study changes on the recent domestic scene such as the imperial Presidency, the welfare state, the technetronic economy, the Black Revolution, Women’s Liberation and the evolving social, cultural, and moral landscape. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-225 Women in American History: Colonial Times to 1880
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

An in-depth study of the lives and experiences of American women from the early seventeenth century to 1880. This course examines three major cultures native, African and European as they met and mixed in colonial America with particular attention to women’s experience in this cultural mixing. Focus will be on wealthy merchant families, slave holding planter families, indentured servants, slaves, factory workers, and immigrants and will include women’s relationships with husbands, children and other women. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) Note: Also listed as WMST-225.

HIST-226 History of African American Experience
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

This course will examine the African American experience in the United States from slavery to the present era. The student will study the chronology of black history, the African heritage, the crucible of slavery, the struggle for equality, Pan Africanism, and the development and evolution of the African American community. Special attention will be given to African American personages and their contributions to American society. The evolution of contemporary race relationships will be evaluated. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HIST-227 Women in American History: 1880 to the Present
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

An in-depth study of the lives and experiences of American women from diverse racial and ethnic groups from 1880 to the present. This course examines the experiences of women in the modern world from the end of the nineteenth century through the twentieth. Focus will be on the varying experiences of reformers, workers, organizers, and immigrants with particular attention to differences between married and single women and between those living in the cities and those living in rural areas. During this time period, women have gained the legal right to vote and run for office, regulate the size of their families, and receive equal pay for equal work. And yet women retain primary responsibility for housekeeping and child care. This course considers the roots of some of these contradictions. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) Note: Also listed as WMST-227.

HIST-228 Women in European History: 1750 to the Present
3 Credits (Intedisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course anlayzes women’s changing economic, family, and political roles from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Topics include the effects of industrialization on women’s work and status, the demographic revolution, and women’s politcal activities in market riots, revolutions, and campaigns for women’s rights. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as WMST-228.


HORTICULTURE

HORT-100 Introduction to Horticulture
4 Credits

Introduction to Horticulture is an introductory course which provides a broad spectrum of topics in the field of plant science. Specific topics covered are: plant structures, classification, soils, plant growth and development, propagation, pesticides, insects, diseases and plant protection. The course’s objective is to make the students well‑rounded in all aspects of plant science and prepare them for future classes in the curriculum of a more specific nature. This course is geared for commercial horticulture workers as well as for the homeowner. The subject matter is covered scientifically and practically so that the student can put into practice what is learned. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

HORT-210 Woody Plants
3 Credits
Woody Plants is an introductory course for nursery and landscape purposes and also covers plants found in arboretums, forests and fields in various regions of the United States. The purpose is to provide a practical understanding of woody plant characteristics so students can relate knowledge taught to the field of ornamental horticulture. A study of plant taxonomy, groupings, plant material terminology and data, and an introduction to plant ecology constitute course topics. Prerequisite: HORT-100. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

HORT-220 Landscape Design and Contracting
3 Credits

In this course, the student will be introduced to the art, aesthetics and science of residential and commercial landscape design and contracting. In addition, the student will be able to proceed with a design plan and install a proper soil, grasses, plant materials, shrubs and structures that will be manageable and lasting. The student will also be introduced to legal responsibilities and cost estimation relative to landscape contracting. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

HORT-230 Pest and Disease Control
3 Credits

Entomology and plant disease control is a basic course for plant science majors. It provides the basic understanding of insects and diseases that attack ornamental plant materials and turf grasses. Details of the nature and structure of insects, effects of insect destruction and insect classification are major components. Plant diseases, weed identification and respective controls are also discussed as they apply to trees, shrubs, herbaceous plants, roses and turf. Prerequisite: HORT-100. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

HORT-240 Turf Grass Management
3 Credits

This course involves the management of turf grasses for both landscape and recreational uses. At the end of the course, the student should have a working knowledge of grass varieties and their uses: use of a key in plant grass identification; growth requirements including temperature, fertilizers, irrigation and drainage; pest identification and control including fungi, nematodes, insects and weeds; cultivation (planting and mowing) thatch management and auxiliary practices; sod establishment; and golf course practices. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)


HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

HMGT-101 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry
3 Credits

This introductory course acquaints the student with the scope and complexity of the hospitality industry by exploring the national and global relationships of lodging, food, and beverage operations. The course examines career opportunities, organizational structures, history and human resource management. Students will examine trends, integrated technology and its effects on customer and guest service in requirements in the lodging and food service industry. (3 hours weekly)

HMGT-111 Foodservice Safety and Sanitation
1 Credit

This course develops the knowledge of basic principles of sanitation and safe food handling in hospitality operations. The course focuses on prevention of food borne illnesses and introduces the students to HACCP planning and implementation. Successful completion of the course can lead to certification as a “Safe Food Handler” by the National Restaurant Association. (1 hour weekly)

HMGT-120 Food Preparation I
3 Credits
Following this introductory course in food production, students will be able to identify and analyze the elements of safe food preparation that include food chemistry, basic cooking techniques and proper use of preparation utensils and equipment. Students will also prepare small quantity, industry standard menus in a commercial kitchen setting. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab). Successful completion of ServSafe and possession of approved utensils and uniform required.

HMGT-160  Introduction to Travel and Tourism
2 Credits

A study of the components of the tourism industry and their interrelationships is the focus of this course. A review of the roles of tour companies, travel agencies, government bureaus, tourism associations and others that assemble, promote and sell tourism services are included. Students will be able to operate within a tourism setting. (2 hours weekly)

HMGT-163 Introduction to Meetings, Conventions, and Expositions
3 Credits
This course provides the student with an introductory approach to the various types of meetings and conventions, the types of organizations that stage these events, and how to reach and sell to this important group segment. It also includes the aspects of meeting and convention service. The course examines practical advice on how to reach each of the group meeting market segments, how to implement successful sales strategies, and how to ensure that an event flows smoothly. (3 hours weekly)

HMGT-164 Event Management
3 Credits

The course provides the student with an introductory approach to planning and executing meetings, special events and conferences. The course examines practical advice on every aspect of organizing and managing special events, such as how to choose the best venue; preparing and managing the budget; scheduling; coordinating food and beverages, selecting decor, themes, and entertainment; media; and staffing. (3 hours weekly)

HMGT-165 Introduction to the Cruise Ship Industry
3 Credits
This introductory course acquaints the student with current issues and trends related to the cruise industry. This also includes different types of cruise lines and the reasons for the popularity of this mode of travel. The course will focus on major elements of sea-based and land-based cruise preparation. (3 hours weekly)

HMGT-180 Hospitality Management Internship
2 Credits
Student will spend at least 240 hours of directed study in a chosen area of the hospitality industry at an off‑campus facility. The faculty instructor and industry mentor will provide and coordinate course objectives, applicable experiences and evaluation. Student will maintain a written journal of internship experiences. Prerequisite: HMGT-101 and HMGT-120. (1 hour weekly plus field experience)

HMGT-220 Food Preparation II
3 Credits

This is an advanced course in food preparation that covers international cuisine and theme menus. It builds on the skills acquired in HMGT-120. Students will learn to plan menus, write recipes that incorporate established food safety standards, schedule labor and production, and execute meals for up to 50 customers. Prerequisite: HMGT-120. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

HMGT-225 Hospitality Purchasing and Cost Control
3 Credits

This course will prepare students to employ the principles of effective food, beverage, and supply purchasing and the cost controls necessary to support food preparation and service departments of a hospitality operation. The course will include procurement, types of markets, food product identification and selection, beverage selection, nonfood products, costing procedures, product yields, and value analysis. Students will acquire knowledge of computerized purchasing, record keeping, and recipe costing and nutritional analysis. (3 hours weekly)

HMGT-242 Lodging Management and Operations
3 Credits
This course presents a detailed study of the management systems in hotel or lodging settings. The student will be able to identify and analyze all relevant departments within a hotel setting. Management of these divisions, along with an examination of inter-departmental operations will be examined. (3 hours weekly)

HMGT-244 Managing the Housekeeping Operation
2 Credits

This course assists students with the development of practical applications of housekeeping operation including the planning, organizing, staffing, and control techniques required to assure quality service. The course examines appropriate personal and professional practices, career opportunities, and organizational structures within a housekeeping department. Prerequisites: HMGT-101 and HMGT-242. (2 hours weekly)

HMGT-250 Food and Beverage Management and Service
3 Credits

This course is a comprehensive review of operations pertaining to food and beverage management. Students will examine various carets, responsibilities, management issues, and operations as they pertain to food and beverage. Students will engage in the theory and practice of service fundamentals. Basic service styles, such as French, Russian, and American service will be taught along with the management functions as they pertain to customer service. (3 hours weekly)

HMGT-260 Fundamentals of Wines, Spirits, and Beers
3 Credits
This course provides an overview of production, origins, purchasing, and responsible service of wines, spirits, and beers. There will also be an emphasis on the principles of matching fine wines and beers with appropriate menu items. Prerequisites: HMGT-101 and HMGT-250. (3 hours weekly)


HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

HMDV-100 Introduction to Human Relations
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to promote personal growth and to improve relationships with others. Skills in active listening and group processes will be developed. Students will identify values, strengths and positive life experiences as a means of enhancing self-confidence. The thrust of the class activities and presentations will be directed at personal life, college and on the job situations. The emphasis is on an integration of thoughts and feelings about oneself and others, and expressing feelings and receiving feedback from others. (3 hours weekly)

HMDV-105 Silas Craft Collegians Seminar I
1 Credit

This course is a special one-credit course for students enrolled in the Silas Craft Collegians Program. The purpose of this course is to promote personal growth and development and enhance the learning potential and success of students. While this course focuses on a broad range of personal development topics, it will ­focus particularly on life skills, self-esteem, and group dynamics and team building. (2 hours weekly)

HMDV-106 Silas Craft Collegians Seminar II
1 Credit

This course is a special one-credit course for students enrolled in the Silas Craft Collegians Program. While this course focuses on a broad range of personal development topics, it will continue the topics discussed in HMDV-105 and will also include motivation, active listening, responsibility, and discipline. (2 hours weekly)

HMDV-107 Silas Craft Collegians Seminar III
1 Credit

This course is a special one-credit course for students enrolled in the Silas Craft Collegians Program. It will extend the examination of the topics introduced in HMDV-105 and HMDV-106 and will include goal-setting and goal management as a major focus. (2 hours weekly)

HMDV-120 Career Development and Decision Making
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to provide a setting for students to systematically examine the skills required to make effective career decisions and formulate life goals. Through a process of self-assessment and exploration of career information resources, the student will consider career possibilities and develop a probable career choice. (3 hours weekly)

HMDV-125 Perspectives on Community Through Service Learning
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
This course examines the concepts of community and community service, including their meaning and value. Through the use of the innovative pedagogical tool of service learning, students will engage in active participation in organized service experiences that meet actual community needs, and which are coordinated with course objectives. Within an interdisciplinary framework, students will learn the theoretical, historical, practical, and political aspects of civic engagement, as well as factors in creating and sustaining healthy communities. It will explore the traditional social science components of community and public service (political, historical and economic), as well as incorporate some of the important philosophies (humanities) for and against community service as put forth by thinkers such as John Dewey. In addition, the course will also address the role of the arts in community (humanities). Emerging issues of community and service, such as the increase in individualism, the privatization of social services, and the changes in the city of Columbia, will also be covered. Students will be required to complete 20 hours of service within the community. (3 hours weekly)

HMDV-130 Adult Development
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to examine the physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of individuals from ages 18 through old age. Students will examine the predictable and unpredictable life changes throughout adulthood. (3 hours weekly)

HMDV-150 Scholars Seminar I
1 Credit

This course is a special one credit course for students enrolled in the Rouse Scholars Program. The purpose of this course is to cover selected leadership, group and interpersonal development topics designed to help students explore their personal and leadership attributes. A significant component of the HMDV-150 also involves career exploration through work with a community mentor.

HMDV-151 Scholars Seminar II
1 Credit

This course is a special one credit course for students enrolled in the Rouse Scholars Program. The ­purpose of this course is to extend topics taught in HMDV-150 and will cover selected leadership, group and interpersonal development topics designed to help ­students explore their personal and leadership attributes. A significant component of HMDV-151 also involves career exploration through work with a community ­mentor.

HMDV-160 STEM Learning Community Seminar I
This is the first course in a series of four courses designed to develop skills needed by STEM majors in their classes and later in their careers. This first semester introduces students to the STEM (Science Technology Engineering & Mathematics) Learning Community. The focus of this semester is to help the student to explore how they, as individuals, think and act and what attracts them to their chosen field. Field trips and activities beyond the classroom are also planned. Enrollment is limited to STEM scholarship recipients or those with STEM majors with a GPA of 2.8 or above.

HMDV-161 STEM Learning Community Seminar II
This course is a special one credit course for the students in the STEM Learning Community. In Seminar II, the focus is on Teamwork. We look at the Space Program, specifically the book “Team Moon: How 400,000 People Landed Apollo 11 on the Moon”. Workshops are given in Communications, and Ethics in the Sciences. The students get to experience teamwork as they work in pairs on a competitive project for the end of the semester. Field trips and activities beyond the classroom are also planned. Enrollment is limited to STEM scholarship recipients or those with STEM majors with a GPA of 2.8 or above.

HMDV-200 Life Span Development
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

The purpose of this course is to examine the growth and development of an individual throughout his/her life. Beginning with the prenatal period and continuing through old age, development from a physical, intellectual, emotional and social perspective will be studied. Theories on development and current research in the field will be reviewed with an emphasis on application of individual case histories and personal experiences. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Child Development requirement for an initial certificate in Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, and Secondary Education. This course also meets the MSDE Human Growth and Development requirement for an initial certificate in Generic Special Education Infant/Primary, Generic Special Education Elementary/Middle, and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HMDV-205 Silas Craft Collegians Seminar IV
1 Credit

This course is a special one credit course for students enrolled in the Silas Craft Collegians Program. While this course focuses on a broad range of personal development topics, it will re-emphasize team-building and the learning community concept. Decision-making and consequential thinking will be a major focus. (2 hours weekly)

HMDV-206 Silas Craft Collegians Seminar V
1 Credit

This course is a special one credit course for students enrolled in the Silas Craft Collegians Program. It will extend the examination of the issues introduced in HMDV-205 as well as returning to any of the other topics of the Silas Craft Collegians Seminar that re-emerge as issues. Leadership skills will be a major new focus. (2 hours weekly)

HMDV-207 Silas Craft Collegians Seminar VI
1 Credit
This course is a special one credit course for students enrolled in the Silas Craft Collegians Program. It will continue the examination of leadership skills including conflict resolution. In addition, it will focus on the pressures and issues related to the upcoming transfer of the students to four-year institutions. (2 hours weekly)

HMDV-240 Death and Dying
3 Credits

This course discusses issues of death, dying, and bereavement from the perspectives of psychology, sociology, religion, spirituality, and culture. Topics include attitudes towards death; suicide; euthanasia; hospice movement and end-of-life care; working with people who have terminal illnesses; bereavement counseling; the funeral business; how religions understand death; psychology of death; Students become more aware about the cultural implications of death, dying, and bereavement, and reflect on their own values and attitudes toward life and death. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-240.

HMDV-250 Scholars Seminar III
1 Credit

This course is a special one credit course for students enrolled in the Rouse Scholars Program. The purpose of this course is to extend topics taught in HMDV-150 and HMDV-151. The seminar will cover selected leadership, group and interpersonal development topics designed to help students explore leadership capabilities. A significant component of HMDV-250 involves applying leadership skills to complete an extended community service project.

HMDV-251 Scholars Seminar IV
1 Credit

This course is a special one credit course for students enrolled in the Rouse Scholars Program. The purpose of this course is to extend topics taught in HMDV-250 and will cover selected leadership, group and interpersonal development topics designed to help students explore leadership capabilities. A significant component of HMDV-250 involves applying leadership skills to complete an extended community service project.

HMDV-260 STEM Learning Community Seminar III
The topics covered in Seminar III focus on “Where Do We Go From Here?” Students take the STRONG survey which indicates what type of career they might enjoy. They have workshops in Resume writing, Internships, and they explore and prepare a presentation for the group about a career that interests them. They prepare for Mock Interviews for an internship or docent position and they apply for an internship for the following summer. Field trips and activities beyond the classroom are also planned. Enrollment is limited to STEM scholarship recipients or those with STEM majors with a GPA of 2.8 or above.

HMDV-261 STEM Learning Community Seminar IV
The focus of the final semester of the Seminar is “Your Time to Shine”. Students have additional workshops in giving oral and written presentations and understanding the role of Statistics in the Sciences. Students may also take a topic from one of their advanced courses and prepare a poster and brief presentation; this may be part of an Honors designation for the advanced class. The student will give give presentation or poster before a small audience and/or prepare a presentation for students interested in a STEM major to Elementary or Middle School students. Students may also participate in the mentorship program. Field trips and activities beyond the classroom are also planned. Enrollment is limited to STEM scholarship recipients or those with STEM majors with a GPA of 2.8 or above.


HUMAN SERVICES

HUMS-110 Introduction to Human Services
3 Credits

This course surveys the philosophies, attitudes and approaches used in the field of human services. Community experts will be invited to present approaches to assisting individuals and groups in a variety of community agencies. The focus is on utilization of community resources to address a variety of human service needs. (3 hours weekly)

HUMS-120 Medical Aspects of Chemical Dependency
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify concepts relevant to alcoholism and the medical aspects of addiction. In addition, the course will include the pharmacology of alcohol and other addictive substances. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-120.

HUMS-121 Introduction to Chemical Dependency Treatment
3 Credits

This course provides students with the opportunity to study the various modalities of addiction therapy. Counseling skills and the philosophical aspects of addiction will also be presented in this course. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-121.

HUMS-122 Individual Counseling Techniques
3 Credits

This course will make available for use clinical methods that attend both to developing diagnostic understanding and to implementing treatment skills with mental health and/or chemically abusing/dependent populations. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-122.

HUMS-123 Group Counseling Skills
3 Credits

Students will receive training in a group-counseling model for use with both mental health and chemically abusing/dependent clients. The emphasis will fall on the group, client and counselor contributions to the group process, and how these factors influence and interrelate with one another. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-123.

HUMS-124 Family Counseling Skills
3 Credits

The family is defined as a complex interactive system. Traditional views of pathology will be redefined as students come to view family problems such as substance abuse, mental abuse, and other psychosocial problems. Students will think diagnostically about families utilizing theory and various techniques, strategies, and approaches that are relevant to working with families. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-124.

HUMS-150 Community Resources and Partnerships
3 Credits
Implementation of community based service models require extensive information about agency resources, familiarity with agency services, and establishment of opportunities that promote collaboration and working relationships among human service professionals. Students will participate in an interactive learning experience to gain an understanding of the development of partnerships among community based agencies that are necessary to secure services for clients. Lectures, discussions, assignments, media presentations, and in class activities will give students practical knowledge and involvement in the development of strategies to access community based services. Prerequisite: HUMS-110. (3 hours weekly)

HUMS-250 Community Services Practicum
3 Credits

Students work in the community in coordination with a faculty member. In addition to meeting core learning outcomes, jointly developed learning outcomes are identified with the faculty member, agency supervisor, and the student. The purpose of the practicum is to enhance the well-being of a targeted population. Students participate in a theory seminar session to engage in reflective discussion 2 hours every other week focused on experiences and the application of theory. Prerequisite: HUMS-110. (1 hour theory, 6 hours lab weekly)


HUMANITIES

HUMN-101 Introduction to the Humanities
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

This course is an introduction to the humanities as an academic discipline which studies the human condition, using methods that are primarily analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. This course helps students see context and make connections across the humanities by tying together the entire cultural experience through a narrative storytelling approach. (3 hours weekly)

HUMN-102 The Psychology of Happiness: A Humanities Approach
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

This course will examine the paradigm shift from pathology to strength-based and resiliency efforts to enhance optimism, decrease stressors and increase subjective well-being. The format of the course will be didactic, participatory, experiential and interactive, with assigned readings, activities, testing and analysis to create an environment that is conducive to learning new concepts, skills and applications in the growing field of “happiness.” While field study in this area is often labeled Positive Psychology, this course will introduce those ideas through background reading, but delve more deeply into the practical skills that students can apply in daily living to enhance happiness and subjective well-being. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HUMN-111 Leadership Development Studies: A Humanities Approach
3 Credits (Humanities/Interdisciplinary Core)

This course is designed to provide emerging and existing leaders the opportunity to explore the concept of leadership and to develop and improve their leadership skills. Instructors will use a variety of learning techniques that may include, but are not limited to, integration of humanities into the study of leadership, dialogue, experiential exercises, literature, films, and shared analysis. Students taking this course will gain a foundational understanding of the concept of leadership theory while developing a personal philosophy of leadership and an awareness of the moral and ethical responsibilities of leadership. The course provides the opportunity to develop essential leadership skills through study, observation, and application. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

HUMN-203 Civility and the Virtue Tradition
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

This course examines the intersection of civility and the virtue tradition in philosophy. As our ancient world cultures have acknowledged, both individual happiness and a harmonious society depend on the cultivation of a virtuous character. Using written texts (including P.M. Forni’s Choosing Civility), films, and literature, the focus is on the costs of incivility and the benefits of civility. Drawing on insights from the humanities and the arts, this course is interdisciplinary in focus and worldwide in scope, covering civility and the virtue tradition in Asia, Africa, and the West. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PHIL-203.


INTERIOR DESIGN

INDS-101 Introduction to Interior Design
3 Credits
This course is an overview of the principles and elements of Interior Design. The student will come to recognize the basic skills used by Interior Design professionals. This course will emphasize the development of conceptual and technical skills as well as the creation of an artistic point of view on the part of the student. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-103 Residential Interior Design
3 Credits

This course is an overview of the principles and elements of Residential Interior Design. The student will come to recognize the basic skills used in the Interior Design profession for designing residential interiors. This interior design course will emphasize the development of conceptual and technical skills as well as the creation of an artistic point of view on the part of the student. Prerequisite or corequisite: INDS-101 or ARTT-115. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-104 Drafting and Space Planning for Interior Design
3 Credits

This course covers the functional, aesthetic, and spatial design of interior spaces. The vocabulary and drafting skills used by professionals in the interior design industry will also be covered. Students will examine environmental, interior and architectural problem solving through space analysis, planning, and decoration of hypothetical contract and residential projects. Prerequisites: ARTT-109 and INDS-101 or ARTT-115. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-105 Drafting for Interior Design
3 Credits
This course introduces the student to the visual language employed by architects and interior designers to communicate their designs to clients and contractors. Students will learn to use traditional drafting tools and equipment to create presentation and construction drawings. Through a series of lectures, exercises, and projects, the student will develop the ability to visualize their designs and to create line-work and lettering required to present those designs in a professional manner. Interior detailing and construction materials and methods will also be explored. Prerequisite: INDS-101. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-106 Space Planning for Interior Design
3 Credits
This course covers the functional, aesthetic, and spatial design of interior spaces. The vocabulary and drafting skills used by professionals in the interior design industry will also be covered. Students will examine environmental, interior and architectural problem solving through space analysis, planning, and decoration of hypothetical design projects. Prerequisite: INDS-101. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-110 Interior Design II–Commercial
3 Credits

This course is an overview of the principles and elements of Commercial Interior Design. The student will come to recognize the basic skills used in the Interior Design profession for designing commercial interiors. This interior design course will emphasize the development of conceptual and technical skills as well as the creation of an artistic point of view on the part of the student. Prerequisites: INDS-101 or ARTT-115 and INDS-104 or ARTT-116. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-112 Historical Interiors
3 Credits

This course will cover furniture, interiors, architecture, methods and materials from the Renaissance to the present. Field trips to museums and/or historic homes are included. Students will develop their own reference files. (3 hours weekly)

INDS-120 Materials and Resources for Interior Design
3 Credits

This course is a comprehensive study of textiles, furniture, and interior finish materials. The characteristics, life expectancies, specifications, and methods for estimating the quantities and costs of the materials used in interior design will be covered. Students will learn about the sources of specifications and other information needed to make professional estimates for interior design projects. Prerequisite: INDS-101 or ARTT-115. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-201 Business Practices for Interior Design
3 Credits
This course will cover professional interior design organizations, business practices, ethics, staffing, and procedures for setting up an interior design practice. The student will work with a client on a project from contact to presentation. Oral communications and graphic skills are emphasized. This course may require field trips. Prerequisite: INDS-110. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-210 Rendering for Interior Design
3 Credits

Students will develop free hand sketching techniques and the ability to draw interiors and architectural subjects from observation. The student will also learn the conventions of perspective and the representation of architectural and interior subjects for the presentation of design proposals. Prerequisite: ARTT-109. (4 hours weekly)

INDS-260 Interior Design Internship
3 Credits

This course is designed to give the advanced Interior Design student 135 hours of practical experience in an interior design work environment. The faculty instructor and industry employer will provide and coordinate course objectives, applicable experiences, and the final evaluation. The student will maintain a written journal of internship experiences and make a final report and presentation. Prerequisites: INDS-201 and INDS-210. (1 hour weekly plus field experience)


ITALIAN

ITAL-101 Elementary Italian I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Italian-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Italian language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Italian language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

ITAL-102 Elementary Italian II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Italian-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Italian language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Italian language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

ITAL-201 Intermediate Italian I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Italian-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Italian language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Italian language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

ITAL-202 Intermediate Italian II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in complex structures and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Italian-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Italian language to other relevant disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Italian language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

ITAL-205 Italian Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of contemporary Italian society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social and cultural realities of Italy from 1945 to the present. Special emphasis on the movement of Italian neorealism and post-neorealism with reference to some major Italian writers (Verga, Pirandello, Moravia, C. Levi, etc.) and their influential works. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-205.


KOREAN

KORE-101 Elementary Korean I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Korean-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Korean language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Korean language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

KORE-102 Elementary Korean II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Korean-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Korean language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Korean language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

KORE-201 Intermediate Korean I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Korean-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Korean language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Korean language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

KORE-202 Intermediate Korean II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information in complex structures and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Korean-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Korean language to other relevant disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Korean language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)


LIFE FITNESS

LFIT-105 Belly Dancing
1 Credit

This course will focus on training students to understand and perform belly dance. Movement includes basic isolation and moves with the head, shoulders, arms, hands, chest, belly, hips, and feet as well as techniques which incorporate the entire body. Students will also learn about the different music, history, and culture of this dance style. Students will demonstrate mastery of belly dance through choreographed and non-choreographed class performances. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as DANC-105.

LFIT-110 Ballroom and Latin Dance
1 Credit

This course will focus on training students to understand and perform basic ballroom and Latin steps, turns, and partnering. Students will also learn the rhythms, history, and culture of each style. Students will demonstrate mastery of these styles through choreographed and non-choreographed class performances. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as DANC-110.

LFIT-112 Lifeguard Training
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide the necessary minimum skills training for a person to qualify as a non-surf lifeguard. This training should be supplemented with training specific to the facility. This course provides ample opportunity for participants to learn and practice new skills, and to build their endurance so that these skills can be accomplished, and the course successfully completed. To be eligible for this course, the student must be fifteen years old by the last day of class; swim 300 yards continuously using these strokes in the following order: 100 yards front crawl using rhythmic breathing and a stabilizing propellant kick, 100 yards breaststroke, 100 yards of either front crawl or breaststroke or a combination of them; swim 20 yards using previously mentioned stroke surface dive to a depth of between 7-10 feet, retrieve a 10 pound object, return to the surface, and swim back the 20 yards within the time allotted. (2.5 hours weekly)

LFIT-114 Basic Scuba
1 Credit

This course is designed for the novice skin and scuba diving enthusiast. Emphasis is placed on physical conditioning, perfection of essential skills, and study of the physics and physiology of diving. Also, external hazards of diving and care and maintenance of equipment are studied. All course activities take place in the classroom and pool of Howard Community College. Prerequisite: Minimum age for participation is 12 years. If under 16 years of age, must register for the course with an adult. Pass a Watermanship Skills Test. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-116 Fitness through Swimming
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide the student with an introduction to swimming and aquatic activities as a means of fitness development and maintenance. In addition to pool sessions, the student will be presented with a series of lectures designed to present to them the basic concepts of fitness development in general, as well as how they relate specifically to swimming. The student will also have the opportunity to learn the techniques and skills involved in snorkeling. Prerequisite: Swim 25-yards, non-stop, using any of the standard swimming strokes. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-117 Aquafit
1 Credit
Aquafit is a vertical water fitness program designed to improve cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility of participants. The course will help the student increase fitness level, improve muscle tone, and look and feel better. Aquafit will be individualized to fit each student’s fitness level and swimming ability. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-120 Aerobic Dance
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide continuous movement through exercise and dance routines. Emphasis will be placed on the physiological benefits of aerobic dance. The course will provide students with the opportunity to maintain an intermediate level of cardiovascular fitness. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-122 StrengthFit
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to improve overall muscle strength, endurance, and tone. Students will learn how to develop and maintain a personal strengthening and conditioning program using basic fitness apparatus. This course will emphasize the use various fitness apparatus including inflatable balls, medicine balls, weighted bars, resistance tubing, and hand weights. No traditional weight machines will be used. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-123 Step Aerobics
1 Credit

This course will introduce you to the fundamentals of Step Aerobics, including information on the science, technique and footwork. Exploration of the “physiological” effects and “biomechanical” effects will be covered. There is no prerequisite for this course. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-124 Conditioning
1 Credit

This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of conditioning techniques through weight training and endurance training. Students will be exposed to exercise bikes, the universal gym and jogging techniques. Specific exercises will be recommended for the development of a personal conditioning program. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-125 Golf
1 Credit

This course is designed to introduce the student to the various aspects of golf. The use of the different types of clubs including the various woods and irons. Proper stroke and putting skills will also be covered. Scoring, course etiquette, and golfing safety will be covered. Students will receive instruction and playing time on a regulation golf course. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-126 Yoga I
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and ability to practice Indian Yoga. Students will experience how yoga can be used to improve health and well-being of mind and body. (1 hour weekly)

LFIT-127 Tai Chi
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide the students with a knowledge and ability to perform the ancient Chinese martial art Tai Chi. The health aspects of Tai Chi practice will be emphasized. Students will also be presented with the history and philosophy of Tai Chi. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-128 Martial Arts I
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the martial arts of the World. Students will train in the techniques and methods of the martial arts of Jeet Kune Do. This form of martial art involves the use of hand strikes, kicking, elbowing, takedowns, throws, and locks. The historical and cultural basis of various arts in general, as well as Jeet Kune Do specifically, will be presented. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-129 Self Defense
1 Credit

This course is designed to introduce the student to the principles and concepts of personal safety and self defense. The theories, strategies, and techniques of the Burmese martial art of Bando will form the base used to develop physical self-defense competency. Development of self-protective awareness will be emphasized. The philosophy, history, legality, and psychology of self defense will be presented. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-130 Mixed Martial Arts
1 Credit

This course is designed to introduce the student to the combat sport of mixed martial arts. Mixed martial arts combine the techniques and practices of striking and grappling arts. The techniques from the three ranges (stand-up, clinch, groundwork) used in the sport of mixed martial arts will be trained. The training methods, strategies, and techniques of Muay Thai/Thai Boxing, Brazilian Jujitsu, Russian Sambo, Japanese Shootwrestling, and Western Catch as Catch Can Wrestling will be examined and trained. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-131 Martial Arts of Southeast Asia
1 Credit

This course is designed to introduce the student to the Southeast Asian martial arts of the Philippines, Indonesia, and Burma. The techniques and methods of Pentjak Silat (Indonesia), Kali/Escrima/Arnis (Philippines), and Bando (Burma) will be examined and trained. Bando (Burmese martial art): Bando is a composite system which includes the traditional Burmese martial arts of Bama Lethey (Burmese Boxing), Thaing (combat self-defense method), Banshay (weapons), and Naban (grappling). Pentjak Silat (Indonesian martial art): Pentjak means to train for fighting and silat means the actual fighting. One can not have pentjak without silat. Many styles of pentjak silat exist in Indonesia, including Serak, Harimau, and Mande Muda. Kali (Filipino martial art): Other versions or names for these martial arts include escrima, arnis, armas de mano, and many others. Class practice will include weapon, striking, throwing, and grappling techniques. Class time will be divided between empty hand and weapons training. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-132 Yoga II
1 Credit
This course is designed to provide the student with the skill to perform a variety of advanced Hatha yoga positions and an understanding and experience of meditation. Students will learn the role yoga and meditation play in the two-way relaxation response between mind/body and body/mind. This course will also give students an understanding of the effect yoga and meditation has on one’s overall well-being physically and mentally. Students should have previous experience in practicing yoga. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-133 Tennis - Beginning
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide students who have never participated in, or have had limited formal instruction in, the sport of tennis. Students will be taught the various tennis strokes, as well as the rules, etiquette, and strategies for playing tennis. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-136 Kickboxing for Fitness
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide students with opportunity to practice kickboxing as a means of aerobic and muscular conditioning. The techniques and training methods from the sport of kickboxing will be used to enhance the students exercise experience. Students need no prior training or experience in kickboxing. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-137 Circuit Weight Training
1 Credit

This course is designed to improve muscle strength/endurance and cardiovascular fitness through participation in weight training and aerobic activities. (2 hours weekly)

LFIT-177 Introduction to Stage Combat
2 Credits

This course will introduce students to the basics of safety and partnering techniques in unarmed, knife, broadsword, quarterstaff, and single sword combat for the stage. Students must work diligently to create a safe environment while portraying a character in a fight performance. Students will demonstrate these partnering skills in class performances. This class will also give an overview on stage combat styles around the world. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-177.

LFIT-197 Pilates
1 Credit
Study and application of the Pilates Mat Program as a method of body conditioning, posing questions for anatomical self-evaluation based on applied instruction, lecture/discussion, required readings, and observation. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as DANC-197.

LFIT-198 Alexander Technique
1 Credit
This course is an examination of the Alexander Technique as a method to investigate the issues of mind/body disciplines and alleviate excessive tension, and habitual holding patterns which produce inefficient use of the body. Principles of the Alexander Technique will be explored through anatomical self-evaluation based on applied instruction, lecture/discussion, required readings, and observation. (2 hours weekly) Note: Also listed as DANC-198.

LFIT-199 Intermediate Pilates
1 Credit

This course is designed to provide the student with the ability to perform Intermediate Mat Pilates exercises. The student will be able to perform a basic postural assessment and explain exercise modifications based on the assessment. This course will incorporate the use of Pilates Fitness circle and Stability ball to challenge exercise intensity. Prerequisite: DANC-197 or LFIT-197. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as DANC-199.

LFIT-205 Intermediate Belly Dancing
1 Credit

This course will enhance students’ previous knowledge in basic belly dance as demonstrated in LFIT/DANC-105 Belly Dancing. This course focuses on training students to hone their skills of isolation, to begin incorporating props and more advanced belly dance techniques, and begins to foster beginning students’ own choreography. Movement vocabulary will include isolations of head, shoulders, arms, hands, chest, belly, hips, and feet as well as techniques incorporating the entire body and traveling. Students are expected to cultivate an enriched understanding of an area of belly dance culture of their choice to further inform their exploration of this dance form. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of belly dance through choreographed and non-choreographed class performances. Prerequisite: LFIT-105 or DANC-105. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as DANC-205.

LFIT-277 Intermediate Stage Combat: Unarmed
2 Credits

This physically-intense course will reinforce safety and partnering techniques in unarmed combat for the stage. Students must work diligently to create a safe environment while portraying a character in a fight performance. Students will demonstrate these advanced partnering skills in class performances. Students will have the option of performing a Skills Proficiency Test in Unarmed for a Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors. If students pass, they receive a certificate of proficiency in Unarmed from the SAFD. Prerequisite: THET/LFIT-177. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-277.

LFIT-278 Intermediate Stage Combat: Single Sword
2 Credits

This physically-intense course will reinforce the safety and partnering techniques in flashy, Hollywood sword fighting for the stage. Students must work diligently to create a safe environment while portraying a character in a fight performance. Students will demonstrate these advanced partnering skills in class performances. Students will have the option of performing a Skills Proficiency Test in Single Sword for a Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors. If students pass, they receive a certificate of proficiency in Single Sword from the SAFD. Prerequisite: THET/LFIT-177. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-278.

LFIT-279 Intermediate Stage Combat: Quarterstaff
2 Credits
This physically-intense course is intended for students who seek advanced actor training in quarterstaff combat for the stage. Students must demonstrate safe partnering techniques and strong acting choices while fighting with quarterstaffs onstage. Topics covered include acting the fight, scene selections from film and literature, quarterstaff techniques, critiquing choreography, and voice in violence. Students will have the option of performing a Skills Proficiency Test in Quarterstaff for a Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors (SAFD). If students pass the Skills Proficiency Test, they receive a certificate of proficiency in Quarterstaff from the SAFD. Prerequisite: THET-177/LFIT-177. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-279.

LFIT-280 Intermediate Stage Combat: Knife
2 Credits

This physically-intense course is intended for students who seek advanced actor training in knife combat for the stage. Students must demonstrate safe partnering techniques and strong acting choices while fighting with aluminum theatrical knives. Topics covered include acting the fight, scene selections from film and literature, knife techniques, critiquing choreography, and voice in violence. Students will have the option of performing a Skills Proficiency Test in Knife for a Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors (SAFD). If students pass the Skills Proficiency Test, they receive a certificate of proficiency in Knife from the SAFD. Prerequisite: THET-177/LFIT-177. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-280.

LFIT-298 Intermediate Alexander Technique
1 Credit

This course follows LFIT-198 (The Alexander Technique) and continues the study and practice of Alexander’s work with the Self as a mind/body unity. Recognizing the spiral nature of this type of learning, whereby we revisit the same activities and principles but at a deeper level, this course contains the same daily activities as the first course such as sitting, standing, walking, breathing and constructive rest. There is emphasis on the particular performance or everyday activity of most interest to the student, whether that be in music, dance, drama, athletics, public speaking, computer work or anything involving complex coordination. Prerequisite: DANC-198 or LFIT-198. (2 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as DANC-298.


MATHEMATICS

MATH-060 Basic Mathematics
2 Credits

Students will improve arithmetic skills and application solving skills. Areas of study include addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers, decimals, fractions and integers; factoring numbers into primes; conversions between decimals, fractions and percents; ratio and proportion; place value and least common multiples. Correct usage of a scientific calculator is taught. Prerequisite: ENGL-093 AND appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (2 hours weekly)

MATH-061 Basic Algebra and Geometry
4 Credits

Students will be working with integers, simplifying numeric expressions with exponents, combining similar terms, multiplying polynomials, evaluating algebraic expressions, using commutative, associative and distributive properties, solving first degree equations, solving and graphing lines, investigating slope and the x- and y- intercepts. They will also become familiar with elementary topics in geometry. Prerequisite: MATH-060 or appropriate mathematics placement score AND ENGL-093. (6 hours weekly)

MATH-064 Integrated Algebra and Geometry I
3 Credits

In this course, the student will develop skills in manipulating algebraic expressions with integer exponents and in simplifying polynomials and radical expressions. The student will write an equation for a line from given information. Systems of equations will be solved graphically and algebraically. Methods of factoring second-degree polynomials will also be included. The ability to solve equations will be expanded to include factorable quadratics. This course is the first of a two-part sequence needed to complete elementary algebra. This course is taught using computer-assisted instruction. Prerequisite: MATH-061 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test.

MATH-065 Integrated Algebra and Geometry II
2 Credits
This course is the second in a two-part sequence covering elementary algebra topics. Students will extend their basic algebra skills to include simplifying, performing operations with and solving equations involving rational expressions. The quadratic formula will be introduced. Application problems will include the use of the Theorem of Pythagoras. After successfully completing this course, students should register for intermediate algebra. This course is taught using computer-assisted instruction. Prerequisite: MATH-064.

MATH-067 Elementary Algebra
4 Credits

Skills covered include manipulating algebraic expressions with integer exponents, factoring second degree polynomials, simplifying polynomials, rational expressions and radicals. The student will write an equation for a line from given information. Systems of equations will be solved graphically and algebraically. Applications include the Theorem of Pythagoras, similar triangles and solving quadratic equations using factoring and the quadratic formula. Prerequisite: MATH-061 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-070 Intermediate Algebra
3 Credits

The emphasis of this course is on using algebraic and graphical techniques to model and solve real world application problems. A graphing calculator is required. (TI 84 recommended, TI-89 not permitted.) Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, inverse, and logarithmic functions; rational equations (both linear and quadratic); radical and power equations; and linear and nonlinear systems. Prerequisite: MATH-067 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-105 Drug Calculations
1 Credit

Students will develop skills in the metric, apothecary and household systems of measurement. Drug calculation problems will provide the student with the opportunity to practice conversions between systems. Students will perform the computations necessary to administer medications in liquid, tablet and capsule form. Prerequisite: MATH-060 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (2 hours weekly for 7 weeks) NOTE: Also listed as HEAL-105.

MATH-108 Business Mathematics
3 Credits

In this course, students will develop skills in the practical applications of arithmetic and mathematical concepts appropriate to the various occupational programs in business. The student will develop the ability to work with percentages, proportions, ratios, tables, charts, graphs, and the scientific calculator in the solution of business problems. The student will also be able to represent data by the use of basic statistical measures. This learning program will also acquaint students with some of the terminology of business and some of the ways in which they can benefit as consumers by an increased awareness of simple business mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH-061 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (3 hours weekly)

MATH-122 Ideas in Mathematics
3 Credits (Mathematics Core)

Students will develop the ability to reason with quantitative information through the study of the principles of reasoning, number sense, probability and statistical reasoning, mathematical modeling and exponential functions. Students will acquire the specific background and critical thinking skills they need to understand the major issues they will face in life, both on a personal level and as citizens in a modern democracy. There is an emphasis upon the contemporary applications to various real-life problems. Intended for students who are not majoring in mathematics or science. Prerequisite: MATH-070 or higher or appropriate score on the mathematics placement exam. (3 hours weekly)

MATH-127 Concepts of Mathematics I
4 Credits

This course is for students in the elementary education and early childhood education programs. Students will study the structural aspects of mathematics and the ‘why’ of arithmetical computations. Mental Arithmetic is a required component of this course. Topics include sets, functions, logic, numeration systems, algorithms and their historical development, estimation, mental computations, and elementary number theory. Special emphasis is given throughout the course to problem-solving techniques including the appropriate use of calculators and computers. MATH-127 is not a mathematics core course. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH-070 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-128 Concepts of Mathematics II
4 Credits (Mathematics Core*)

This course is the second course in a sequence intended primarily for students in the elementary and early childhood education programs. Topics include probability, metric and non-metric geometry, dimensional analysis, congruence and similarity, and coordinate and transformational geometry. Special emphasis is given throughout the course to problem-solving techniques including the appropriate use of calculators and computers. *Core Course for appropriate education majors only. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH-070 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-138 Statistics
4 Credits (Mathematics Core)

In this course, students will develop the skills necessary to examine basic statistical terminology, develop pictorial and analytical distributions and use statistical tables. A calculator and a statistical computation program are used to calculate measures of central location and variation, etc. Other topics include the normal distribution, linear regression and correlation, sampling, hypothesis testing, the chi square test and probability related to statistics. Prerequisite: MATH-070 or higher or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-141 College Algebra
3 Credits (Mathematics Core)

In this course students will learn the language of functions and be introduced to families of functions and their applications. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Other topics include solving systems of linear equations using matrices, matrix algebra and linear programming. Emphasis will be placed on solving problems algebraically and with the technological tools used in business and the social sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 070 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-143 Precalculus I
3 Credits (Mathematics Core)

In this course, students will study topics from the first half of precalculus. Polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions will be studied, along with techniques for solving equations and inequalities, complex numbers, operations on functions and inverse functions. A graphical approach will be utilized throughout, with an emphasis on solving application problems. This course replaces MATH-131. Prerequisite: MATH- 070 or appropriate score on mathematics placement test. (3 hours weekly)

MATH-145 Business Calculus
3 Credits (Mathematics Core)

Students will develop skills in initial content of both differential and integral calculus, with an emphasis on applications from business and economics. Topics include finding the limits of functions, computing derivatives of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions using the chain rule and the basic differentiation rules, and substitution in finding definite and indefinite integrals. Applications include dealing with optimization, related rates, marginal analysis, supply and demand, and area. Graphs of functions will be analyzed using first and second derivatives and limits to identify asymptotes, intervals of increase/decrease, maxima/minima, concavity, and points of inflection. The fundamental theorem of calculus, implicit differentiation, differentials and summations of area will be used when appropriate. Students can not receive credit for both MATH-145 and MATH-181. Prerequisite: MATH-131, MATH-141 or equivalent. (3 hours weekly)

MATH-153 Precalculus II
3 Credits (Mathematics Core)

This course is the second part of a two course sequence in precalculus. Students will develop skills in basic trigonometry and its applications, with an emphasis on modeling with functions and other algebraic skills necessary for the study of calculus. Trigonometry will be defined using the unit circle approach, with emphasis on the geometry of the circle. Other topics include classical right triangle trigonometry, trigonometric identities and equations, the laws of sines and cosines, graphs and properties of the trigonometric functions and their inverses, parametric equations, trigonometric form of complex numbers, De Moivre’s theorem, polar coordinates and sequences and series. A graphical approach will be utilized throughout, with an emphasis on solving application problems. This course replaces MATH-133. Prerequisite: MATH-131 or MATH-143. (3 hours weekly)

MATH-155 Precalculus I & II
5 Credits (Mathematics Core)

Students will develop skills in the analysis of functions and solving of equations and inequalities. Polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions will be studied in detail. Additional topics include complex numbers and parametric and polar equations and sequence and series. Modeling using data analysis will be an integral part of this course. A graphical approach will be utilized throughout, with an emphasis on solving application problems. This course replaces MATH-135. Not open to students who have completed MATH-131, MATH-133, MATH-143 or MATH-153. MATH-155 is equivalent to MATH-143 and MATH-153. Prerequisite: Appropriate score on mathematics placement test or equivalent. (5 hours weekly)

MATH-181 Calculus I
4 Credits (Mathematics Core)

Students will develop skills in the initial content of both differential and integral calculus including finding limits of functions, exposure to the epsilon-delta process and continuity, finding derivatives and integrals of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, inverse functions, the chain rule, and integration by substitution. Applications dealing with optimization, related rates, Newton’s method, L’Hopital’s rule, and motion problems and properties of the graphs of functions are covered. Theorems include the mean-value theorem for derivatives and integrals, the squeeze theorem and the fundamental theorems of calculus. Implicit differentiation, differentials and summations of area will be used when appropriate. The use of a computer algebra system will be an integral part of the course. Credit will only be granted for one of the following: MATH-140, MATH-145 or MATH-181. Prerequisite: MATH-153 or MATH-155 or appropriate score on the mathematics placement test. A grade of C or higher in the Precalculus sequence is strongly recommended. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-182 Calculus II
4 Credits (Mathematics Core)
This course is the second in a three-part calculus sequence. Applications include area bounded by curves, volume by rotating and slicing, arc length, work, and centers of mass. Integration techniques taught include integration by parts, partial fractions, trigonometric substitution, numerical integration, and improper integrals. Students will be introduced to hyperbolic functions, elementary differential equations, direction fields, parametric equations, polar coordinates and their applications. The study of sequences and infinite series will include tests for convergence of the various types of series, leading to power series and Taylor series. The use of a computer algebra system will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: MATH-181 or equivalent, a grade of C or higher is recommended. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-186 Introductory Numerical Analysis
3 Credits (Mathematics Core)

In this course, students will develop skills necessary to design and implement algorithms to solve problems using digital computers. The FORTRAN or an equivalent language will be used to program solutions to these problems. Techniques will include data input and storage, selection of relevant numerical and non-numerical methods for problem solution, and the efficient ordering of data for meaningful output presentation. Some problems will be fundamental to engineering design, but non-engineers interested in numerical analysis methods along with the construction and description of effective procedures to solve the problem should gain knowledge which can be used in their respective fields of interest. Prerequisite: MATH-182 and CMSY-135 or equivalent. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours lab weekly)

MATH-220 Discrete Structures
3 Credits (Mathematics Core)
In this course, students will develop skills in fundamental mathematical concepts related to computer science. The course will discuss elements of set theory, relations, functions, propositional logic, permutations, combinations, probability proof techniques, and elementary graph theory, selected applications will be included. Prerequisite: MATH-181 or equivalent. (3 hours weekly)

MATH-240 Calculus III
4 Credits (Mathematics Core)

This course includes vector calculus in both two and three dimensional space along with the classical theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. It will also include partial derivatives and multiple integrals along with a number of appropriate applications. A graphing calculator and MATLAB, a computer algebra system, will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: MATH-182 or equivalent, a grade of C or higher is recommended. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-250 Linear Algebra
4 Credits (Mathematics Core)

Students will develop skills in the basic concepts of linear algebra. These skills will cover areas such as vector spaces, linear equations and matrices, similar matrices, linear transformations, eigenvalues, function spaces, determinates, and quadratic forms and complex vector spaces. Various applications will be examined. Use of MATLAB, a computer algebra system, is required. Prerequisite: MATH-181 or equivalent. (4 hours weekly)

MATH-260 Differential Equations
3 Credits (Mathematics Core)

This course consists of concepts generally encountered in a first course in differential equations including a comprehensive treatment of first order differential equations employing a variety of solution techniques. A study of higher order equations, largely second order, is included with emphasis on linear equations possessing constant coefficients as well as variable coefficients. Classical and contemporary applications are included throughout coming from diverse fields such as mechanics, electrical circuits, economics. Computer uses with MATHLAB software provide an integrated environment for symbolic, graphic, and numeric investigations of routine solutions of differential equations and of modeling physical phenomena. The course concludes with a discussion of the Laplace transform and its application to linear equations with constant coefficients. Prerequisite: MATH-182 or equivalent, a grade of C or higher is recommended. (3 hours weekly)


MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNICIAN

MLTS-201 Introduction to the Medical Laboratory
3 Credits

This course combines lecture and laboratory practice. It allows students to demonstrate professionalism and interpersonal skills while achieving competence with common laboratory procedures such as phlebotomy, making solutions, using aseptic techniques, and handling laboratory equipment such as microscopes, centrifuges, and pipettes. Students will be given the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge in laboratory mathematics, safety, medical regulations, and medical ethics. Pre- or corequisites: ENGL-121, CHEM-101, BIOL-101, and MATH-138. (2 hours theory, 4 hours lab weekly)

MLTS-202 Clinical Chemistry
3 Credits

This course combines lecture and laboratory practice integral to the profession of Medical Laboratory Science. The course will focus on the following clinical chemistry topics: electrolytes, blood gases, carbohydrates, proteins, non-protein nitrogen compounds, lipids, minerals and vitamins, enzymes, endocrinology, and toxicology. Laboratory procedures, automation, and computerization will be part of the laboratory practice. This course will emphasize normal versus abnormal results with focus on clinical correlation and quality assurance. Prerequisites: MLTS-201, CHEM-101, and CHEM-201. (2.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab weekly)

MLTS-203 Clinical Hematology
4 Credits
This course combines lecture and laboratory practice integral to the profession of Medical Laboratory Science. The course will focus on the following clinical hematology topics: hematopoiesis, anemias, leukemias, and hemostasis/coagulation. The course will emphasize normal versus abnormal results with focus on clinical correlation and quality assurance. Hematology theory will be supplemented with hands-on microscopy and blood testing procedures. Prerequisite: MLTS-201. (3.25 hours theory, 3 hours lab weekly)

MLTS-204 Clinical Immunology/Immunohematology
4 Credits
This course combines lecture and laboratory practice integral to the profession of Medical Laboratory Science. The course will focus on the following clinical immunologic topics: immunity, complement, serological procedures, autoimmunity, immunohematology genetics, blood groups and HLA system, blood bank testing, donation, and component therapy. Prerequisite: MLTS-201. (3.25 hours theory, 3 hours lab weekly)

MLTS-205 Clinical Microbiology I
3 Credits

This course combines lecture and laboratory practice integral to the profession of Medical Laboratory Science. The course will focus on the following clinical topics: urinalysis, body fluids examination, parasitology, and mycology. Theory will be supplemented with hands-on microscopy and laboratory testing procedures. Prerequisites: MLTS-201 and BIOL-200. (2.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab weekly)

MLTS-206 Clinical Microbiology II
3 Credits
This course combines lecture and laboratory practice integral to the profession of Medical Laboratory Science. The course will focus on the following clinical microbiology topics: aerobic and anaerobic bacteriology, virology, miscellaneous organisms (such as Chlamydia, Spirochetes, and Rickettsia), susceptibility testing, and epidemiology. The course will emphasize normal flora versus pathogens with focus on clinical correlation. Theory will be supplemented with hands-on microscopy and laboratory testing. Prerequisites: MLTS-201 and BIOL-200. (2.5 hours theory, 2 hours lab weekly)

MLTS-251 Chemistry Clinical Practice
2 Credits

Chemistry Clinical Practice consists of an internship at a sponsoring chemistry laboratory clinical site. Supervised activities in areas of blood and body fluid clinical analysis are meant to enhance the student’s medical laboratory knowledge base with emphasis on professionalism, safety, problem-solving, quality assurance, and instrument maintenance. Prerequisites: MLTS-201, MLTS-202, MLTS-203, MLTS-204, MLTS-205, and MLTS-206. (3-week block of time at the clinical site for 8 hours per day, 5 days a week)

MLTS-252 Hematology Clinical Practice
2 Credits

Hematology Clinical Practice consists of an internship at a sponsoring hematology laboratory clinical site. Supervised activities in areas of blood and body fluid clinical analysis are meant to enhance the student’s medical laboratory knowledge base with emphasis on professionalism, safety, problem-solving, quality assurance, and instrument maintenance. Prerequisites: MLTS-201, MLTS-202, MLTS-203, MLTS-204, MLTS-205, and MLTS-206. (3-week block of time at the clinical site for 8 hours per day, 5 days a week)

MLTS-253 Immunology/Immunohematology Clinical Practice
2 Credits

Immunology/Immunohematology Clinical Practice consists of an internship at a sponsoring serology and blood bank laboratory clinical site. Supervised activities in areas of blood and body fluid immunologic analysis are meant to enhance the student’s medical laboratory knowledge base with emphasis on professionalism, safety, problem-solving, and quality assurance. Prerequisites: MLTS-201, MLTS-202, MLTS-203, MLTS-204, MLTS-205, and MLTS-206. (3-week block of time at the clinical site for 8 hours per day, 5 days a week)

MLTS-254 Microbiology Clinical Practice
2 Credits

Microbiology Clinical Practice consists of an internship at a sponsoring microbiology laboratory clinical site. Supervised activities in areas of microbiologic clinical analysis are meant to enhance the student’s medical laboratory knowledge base with emphasis on professionalism, safety, problem-solving, and quality assurance. Prerequisites: MLTS-201, MLTS-202, MLTS-203, MLTS-204, MLTS-205, and MLTS-206. (3-week block of time at the clinical site for 8 hours per day, 5 days a week)


METEOROLOGY

METO-111 Meteorology
3 Credits (Science Core)
This course is designed as an introduction to the study of weather, climate and the atmosphere. Topics will include solar and terrestrial radiation, temperature and humidity, cloud formation, air pressure and winds, circulation and weather patterns, tornadoes, hurricanes, air pollution, and climatic change. (3 hours weekly)

METO-112 Meteorology Laboratory
1 Credit (Science Core)

This course is a laboratory study of weather variables, atmospheric motion, precipitation and topics in modern weather science. In this course, students will acquire and interpret basic meteorological data, to study atmospheric phenomena. The construction and analysis of weather maps will be used with an emphasis on weather forecasting. Pre- or corequisite: METO-111. (2 hours lab weekly)


MICROSOFT

MSFT- 218 Managing a Microsoft Windows 2000 Network Environment
3 Credits

This course provides the knowledge required by System Administrators, Network Administrators, and IT professionals who implement, manage and troubleshoot existing network and server environments based on the Microsoft Windows® 2000 platform. These skills are generally required in medium to large size organizations that maintains user desktops and servers, spanning 2 to 100 physical locations via Large Area Networks (LANs) and the Internet or Intranets. Additionally, this course provides the skills and knowledge necessary for the Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) certification. It is intended to prepare students to take Microsoft Exam 70-218: Managing a Microsoft Windows 2000 Network Environment. Prerequisite: MSFT-205 or MSFT-206. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-230 Designing Microsoft Windows 2000 Active Directory Services
3 Credits

This course is designed to give students the ability to analyze the business requirements and design a directory service architecture, including: unified directory services such as Active Directory and Windows NT domains; connectivity between and within systems, system components, and applications; data replication such as directory replication and database replication. In addition, students will develop the skills required to analyze the business requirements for desktop management and design a solution for desktop management that meets business requirements. Prerequisite: MSFT-215 or MSFT-156. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-235 Designing a Secure Microsoft Windows 2000 Network
3 Credits

This course will give students the skills required to analyze the business requirements for security and design a security solution that meets business requirements. Security includes: Controlling access to resources, auditing access to resources, authentication, and encryption. Prerequisite: MSFT-215 or MSFT-156. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-240 Designing Microsoft Windows 2000 Network Infrastructure
3 Credits

This course will give students the skills required to analyze the business requirements for a network infrastructure and design a network infrastructure that meets business requirements. Network infrastructure elements include: network topology, routing, IP addressing, name resolution such as WINS and DNS, virtual private networks (VPNs), remote access, and telephony solutions. Prerequisite: MSFT-215 or MSFT-156. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-272 Implementing and Supporting Microsoft Windows XP Professional
3 Credits
The purpose of this course is to address the implementation and desktop support needs of customers that are planning to deploy and support Microsoft Windows XP Professional in a variety of stand-alone and network operating system environments. It provides in-depth, hands-on training for Information Technology (IT) professionals responsible for the planning, implementation, management, and support of Windows XP Professional. Prerequisite: MSFT-299. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-273 Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment
3 Credits

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills that are required to manage accounts and resources, maintain server resources, monitor server performance, and safeguard data in a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 environment. Prerequisite: MSFT-299. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-277 Implementing, Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
3 Credits

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to configure, implement, manage, and maintain a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 network infrastructure. Students will learn to implement, manage, and maintain server networking technologies. These tasks include implementing routing; implementing, managing, and maintaining Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Domain Name System (DNS), and Windows Internet Name Service (WINS); securing Internet Protocol (IP) traffic with Internet Protocol security (IPSec) and certificates; implementing a network access infrastructure by configuring the connections for remote access clients; and managing and monitoring network access. Prerequisite: MSFT-273. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-278 Planning and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network Infrastructure
3 Credits
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan and maintain a Windows Server 2003 network infrastructure. Prerequisite: MSFT-277. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-279 Planning, Implementing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Infrastructure
3 Credits
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to successfully plan, implement, and troubleshoot a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory directory service infrastructure. The course focuses on a Windows Server 2003 directory service environment, including forest and domain structure, Domain Name System (DNS), site topology and replication, organizational unit structure and delegation of administration, Group Policy, and user, group, and computer account strategies. Prerequisite: MSFT-278. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-282 Designing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Network Infrastructure
3 Credits
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to design a Microsoft Active Directory directory service and network infrastructure for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 environment. The course is intended for systems engineers who are responsible for designing directory service and/or network infrastructures. Prerequisite: MSFT-279. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-283 Designing Security for a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Network
3 Credits

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to design a secure network infrastructure. Topics include assembling the design team, modeling threats, and analyzing security risks in order to meet business requirements for securing computers in a networked environment. The course encourages decision-making skills through an interactive tool that simulates real-life scenarios that the target audience may encounter. Students are given the task of collecting the information and sorting through the details to resolve the given security requirement. Prerequisite: MSFT-215 or MSFT-279. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-297 Planning, Implementing, Managing and Maintaining a
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment for an MCSE on Windows 2000
3 Credits

This course provides students with the knowledge and new skills that they need to plan, implement, manage, and maintain a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 networked environment. The focus of the course is on the changes from Microsoft Windows 2000 to Windows Server 2003, and is intended for systems engineers who want to upgrade their skills from Windows 2000 to Windows Server 2003. This course is intended for Microsoft Certified Systems Engineers (MCSEs) certified on Windows 2000 who have experience planning, implementing, and supporting a Windows 2000-based Microsoft Active Directory directory service network, and who need to learn how to leverage those skills in a Windows Server 2003 environment. Prerequisite: MSFT-215.

MSFT-299 Fundamentals and Practice for Network+ Certification
3 Credits
This course is designed to give students the knowledge and experience to install and configure the TCP/IP client, and design, install and configure computer networks. Prerequisite: CMSY-134, CMSY-142, CMSY-143. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-572 Implementing and Managing Microsoft Exchange 2000
3 Credits
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure Microsoft Exchange 2000. It prepares students with skills needed to deploy and manage Exchange 2000. This course will assist students in operating in medium to large computing environments that typically have multiple physical locations, mixed client connection protocols, and Internet messaging connectivity. Knowledge of the Microsoft Windows 2000 operating system is highly recommended. Prerequisite: MSFT-156 or MSFT-215 or MSFT-922 or MSFT-973. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-862 Administering a Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Database
3 Credits

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills required to install, configure, administer, and troubleshoot the Microsoft SQL Server client/server databse management system of Microsoft SQL Server 2000. Prerequisite: MSFT-156 or MSFT-205 or MSFT-973. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)

MSFT-863 Programming a Microsoft SQL Server 2000 Database
3 Credits

This course provides students with the technical skills required to program a database solution with Microsoft SQL Server 2000 client/server database management system. Prerequisite: MSFT-862. (3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab weekly)


MUSIC

MUSC-100 Fundamentals of Music
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Open to all interested students, this class is an introduction to the concepts of reading and writing music. It is intended for the student with limited musical knowledge or background in music who wishes to study music theory, or for the student who wishes to learn to read music. Primary concepts of note reading, rhythm, scales, key signatures and intervals will be studied along with fundamental keyboard skills, simple melodic and rhythmic dictation and elementary sightreading. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-101 Music Appreciation
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Open to all interested students, this class provides an introduction to musical elements, forms and stylistic periods from the Middle Ages through the popular music of today. While concentrating primarily on Western Art Music and its representative composers, the course also touches on the increasing importance of different forms of popular music in the last century and its roots in various ethnic musical expression. Attention will also be given to historical events, sociological influences and encounters with non-European cultures within each historical period and their effect on musical development. This course is designed for the non-music major. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-103 The Business of Music
3 Credits

Open to all interested students, this course is designed to be an introductory study of the field of music as a continually changing and dynamic commercial profession. It is designed to aid the performer as well as the moonlighter and the music hobbyist in their interaction with the business of music. The student will explore various professions within the field of commercial music, basic copyright information, business and management practices as related to the Arts and occasionally interact with professionals and specialists in the field. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-107 American Popular Music
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Open to all interested students, this course offers a panoramic view of the history of American popular music from the mid 1800’s to the present. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and discuss each of the following aspects of American popular music: specific styles and style periods, pivotal compositions and composers, ethnic traditions which have been major contributors in the development and evolution of popular music, song forms and their contribution to style period development, influences on American history, and historical influences on popular music. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-108 African American Music
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Open to all interested students, this course will examine the heritage of African American music from the colonial era through the jazz age to the present. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify the characteristic elements of African music, trace the development of the major idioms such as religious and ragtime music, identify important African American composers and performers, and articulate the role of African American music in ritual and ceremony, as transmitter of culture and as a social and political tool. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-110 Music Theory, Musicianship, and Keyboard Skills I
4 Credits

Music Theory I is the first of a four-semester sequence of music theory courses required of all music majors. It offers an integrated approach to the study of musical structure that combines written work, ear-training, keyboard skills, and sight singing. After a very brief review of notation, rhythm, major and minor scales, and key signatures, the student will develop knowledge and understanding of the following: a basic introduction to harmony including intervals, chords and their inversions; non-harmonic tones, the writing of four-part harmony; and sight reading, melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic structures, and musical form in melody, as well as the appropriate functional keyboard skills. Corequisite: MUSC-110L. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab and additional practice time weekly)

MUSC-111 Music Theory, Musicianship and Keyboard Skills II
4 Credits

Second in the four-semester Music Theory sequence required of music majors, this course continues the integrated approach introduced in Theory I. Selected topics include functional harmony, harmonic spacing and doubling, chord connection, cadences, modulating, seventh chords, melody and bass writing. The practice of rhythmic, harmonic and melodic reading and dictation will be continued, along with sight singing and keyboard skills. Prerequisite: MUSC-110, Corequisite: MUSC-111L. (4 hours lecture; 3 hours lab and additional practice time weekly)

MUSC-112 Applied Music (Non-Music Majors)
2 Credits

Individual instruction for pre-college or personal enrichment. (1 one-hour lesson per week)

MUSC-113 Applied Music (Non-Music Majors)
1 Credit

Individual instruction for pre-college or personal enrichment. (1 half-hour lesson per week)

MUSC-116 Musicianship for the Musical Theatre
3 Credits

Musicianship for the Musical Theater is a one semester course required of all Musical Theater Majors. It is an intensive approach to teaching students the aural skills that enable them to sing music at sight, a process that usually takes place over a period of four semesters in a traditional music program. As such, students in this class must be able to read music, as it does not include the fundamentals of music reading. After a brief review of musical notation, the student will learn solfège and its applications through standard ear training exercises, then progress to literature from operetta and musical theater through the mid 1900s. After these basic skills are developed, more difficult musical theater literature from 1950 through the present will be studied. Exposure to Musical Theater repertoire and learning music without assistance will be stressed. It is strongly recommended that students possess basic music reading skills equivalent to MUSC-100 Fundamentals of Music. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-117 Applied Music I
2 Credits
First semester of private college level music study. Required for music major. Corequisite: MUSC-117L. (1 one-hour lesson per week, one hour lab weekly)

MUSC-118 Applied Music II
2 Credits

Second semester of private college level music study. Required for music major. Corequisite: MUSC-118L. (1 one-hour lesson per week, one hour lab weekly)

MUSC-119 Applied Music I
1 Credit

First semester of private college level study. Corequisite: MUSC-119L. (1 half-hour lesson per week, one hour lab weekly)

MUSC-120 Applied Music II
1 Credit
Second semester of private college level study. Corequisite: MUSC-120L. (1 half-hour lesson per week, one hour lab weekly)

MUSC-121 Introduction to Music Technology
2 Credits

This course is an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and basic skills needed to work with computer-based music applications and basic MIDI (synthesizer) technology used in core music classes. The order in which these projects are presented is intended to correspond to curricula in the music department, although non-music major students may enroll in this class. The course is also designed to give students a background that will allow them to more easily incorporate additional technology which they will find in the world of music and music education. It is strongly recommended that students take this class during their first semester of matriculation into the music curriculum. (2 hours weekly)

MUSC-122 Jazz Improvisation I
2 Credits

This course offers a step by step approach to the art and science of jazz improvisation by focusing on the basic elements of music: sound, rhythm, melody, harmony, and form. The student will learn how to create and develop musical ideas and play them in a jazz style. The course will include basic ear training exercises as well as some transcription of jazz solos. The student will develop a greater awareness of musical style and structure through the use of a variety of listening exercises. The student must be able to read music and possess basic technical proficiency on his/her instrument. (2-3 hours weekly)

MUSC-123 Jazz Improvisation II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of Jazz Improvisation I. The student will learn how to improvise in various jazz styles over standard chord progressions. The course will include ear training exercises and transcription of jazz solos of different styles. The student will develop a greater awareness and understanding of multiple jazz styles through a variety of listening and performance exercises. Prerequisite: MUSC-122. (2-3 hours weekly)

MUSC-126 Lyric Diction I – Italian/Latin
2 Credits

The first in a series of courses designed for singers and choral conductors who wish to improve their linguistic skills and knowledge of Italian/Latin, as applied through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), as well as expanding their knowledge of standard vocal repertoire. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-127  Lyric Diction II - English
2 Credits

The second in a series of courses designed for singers and choral conductors who wish to improve their linguistic skills and knowledge of English, as applied through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), as well as expanding their knowledge of standard vocal repertoire. Prerequisite: MUSC-126. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-131-134 Major Ensemble –
Chorus I, II, III, IV
1 Credit

Each of these ensembles offers a performance-oriented exposure to both traditional and contemporary styles in each of their respective genres. Special attention will be given to those musicianship skills which are crucial to effective ensemble performance. (2-3 hours weekly)

MUSC-135 Fundamentals of Musicianship and Keyboard Skills
3 Credits
This class is designed to develop students’ ability to match pitch, sing intervals, sing pitches of scales and chords, sight-sing simple written melodies with solfege syllables, perform simple rhythmic patterns, and take simple dictation. It is also designed to introduce students to basic keyboard skills including developing a comfortable hand position and ease of hand movement on the keyboards. This course is designed for music major students with little or no musical backgrounds, and it will prepare students for lab work in MUSC-110L. Prerequisite: MUSC-100. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-141-144 Major Ensemble –
Chamber Singers, I, II, III, IV
1 Credit
Each of these ensembles offers a performance-oriented exposure to both traditional and contemporary styles in each of their respective genres. Special attention will be given to those musicianship skills which are crucial to effective ensemble performance. (2-3 hours weekly)

MUSC-145 Music Technology in Society
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities/Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

From pop music played by a toothbrush, to medieval chants used as cell phone ring tones, to orchestral pieces written to accompany video games, music is embedded in more aspects of people’s day to day lives than ever before. This course, which is open to all interested students, will examine the use of technology in the creation and presentation of music through history and especially in today’s world. Students will participate in the creation of music and sound projects, but are not required to have a music or technology background. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-151-154 Major Ensemble –
Jazz Ensemble I, II, III, IV
1 Credit

Each of these ensembles offers a performance-oriented exposure to both traditional and contemporary styles in each of their respective genres. Special attention will be given to those musicianship skills which are crucial to effective ensemble performance. Audition is required. (2-3 hours weekly)

MUSC-158 Jazz Theory
3 Credits

Jazz Theory is a one-semester course required of all students seeking a Certificate of Proficiency in Music Performance–Jazz Studies and suggested for those students interested in Jazz Theory. It continues the integrated approach to musical structure that combines written work, ear training, keyboard skills, and sight singing that was established in Music Theory I and II. Selected topics include the study of typical jazz chord structures, Major, melodic minor, diminished, and whole tone harmonic structure, slash chords, harmonic and melodic analysis, blues forms, and re-harmonization. Prerequisite: MUSC-111. (4 hours weekly)

MUSC-159 Jazz History
3 Credits

The purpose of this course is to examine the development of Jazz music from its origins to present day. Students will explore the different eras, styles, artists, literature and social issues associated with Jazz music. The class will include audio and video recordings to illustrate the stylistic differences and development of each era. Upon completion of this course, students will not only have a strong understanding of the history of Jazz music; they will also have improved listening skills for a greater appreciation of this American art form. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-161 Introduction to Music Therapy and Practice I
2 Credits

Introduction to Music Therapy and Practice, Parts I and II, is a two-semester course designed to introduce the student to the profession of Music Therapy. In Introduction to Music Therapy and Practice, Part I, the student will study basic concepts of Music Therapy including definition, history, man as a musical being, the functions of music and the use of music as a treatment tool. Students will also study the concepts of the treatment process and research as it applies to music therapy. Students will begin a Music Therapy Professional Portfolio. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-162 Introduction to Music Therapy and Practice II
2 Credits

Introduction to Music Therapy and Practice, Parts I and II, is a two-semester course designed to introduce the student to the profession of Music Therapy. As the second half of a two-part course, MUSC-162 is designed to explore the populations served by music therapists in greater depth and to introduce students to approaches upon which music therapy practices are based. Students will add papers, readings, observations and techniques pertinent to these populations in their Music Therapy Professional Portfolio. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-171-174 Major Ensemble –
Guitar Ensemble I, II, III, IV
1 Credit

Each of these ensembles offers a performance-oriented exposure to both traditional and contemporary styles in each of their respective genres. Special attention will be given to those musicianship skills which are crucial to effective ensemble performance. (2-3 hours weekly)

MUSC-181-184 Major Ensemble –
Specialized Instrumental Ensembles I, II, III, IV
1 Credit

Each of these ensembles offers a performance-oriented exposure to both traditional and contemporary styles in each of their respective genres. Special attention will be given to those musicianship skills which are crucial to effective ensemble performance. (2-3 hours weekly)

MUSC-185 Instrumental Techniques – Brass
2 Credits

This course introduces students to the brass instrument family. Students will learn about the instruments’ historical and acoustical background as well as how to play each instrument. Basic concepts of teaching, methods and suggested materials for use, and techniques of individual and classroom instruction will also be introduced. Students should possess musicianship skills and proficiency on one or more instruments/voice. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-186 Instrumental Techniques – Woodwinds
2 Credits

This course introduces students to the woodwind instrument family. Students will learn about the instruments’ historical and acoustical background as well as how to play each instrument. Basic concepts of teaching, methods and suggested materials for use, and techniques of individual and classroom instruction will also be introduced. Students should possess musicianship skills and proficiency on one or more instruments/voice. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-187 Instrumental Techniques – Strings
2 Credits

This course introduces students to the string instrument family. Students will learn about the instruments’ historical and acoustical background as well as how to play each instrument. Basic concepts of teaching, methods and suggested materials for use, and techniques of individual and classroom instruction will also be introduced. Students should possess musicianship skills and proficiency on one or more instruments/voice. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-188 Instrumental Techniques – Percussion
2 Credits

This course introduces students to the percussion instrument family. Students will learn about the instruments’ historical and acoustical background as well as how to play basic rudiments for each instrument. Basic concepts of teaching, methods and suggested materials for use, and techniques of individual and classroom instruction will also be introduced. Students should possess musicianship skills and proficiency on one or more instruments/voice. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-189 Functional Guitar Class I
2 Credits

This is the first in a two-semester sequenced course. It is designed to address the specialized skill sets needed for music students wanting to pursue a major in music therapy or music education as well as for music therapists to meet the list of core competencies as defined by the American Music Therapy Association. This course can also serve as an introduction to guitar accompaniment for the general elective student. The course will cover functional aspects of guitar accompaniment as well as include historical facts, care of the guitar, tuning, chord chart and tablature reading, scales, stylistic approaches, chord theory, and group accompaniment. The goal of this class is to produce technical and accompaniment competencies utilizing tablature and chord charts with an emphasis on folk, blues, popular and multicultural idioms. (2 hours weekly)

MUSC-190 Functional Guitar Class II
2 Credits

This is the second in a two-semester sequenced class. It is designed to address the specialized skill sets needed for music students wanting to pursue a major in music therapy or music education as well as for music therapists to meet the list of core competencies as defined by the American Music Therapy Association. It is also an introduction to guitar accompaniment for the general elective student. The course will continue advancing on the topics covered in the MUSC-189 with emphasis on standard notation reading, group accompaniment, advanced chord structures and finger picking approaches. The goal of this class is to produce technical and accompaniment competencies utilizing tablature, chord charts and standard notation with an emphasis on folk, blues, popular and multicultural idioms. Prerequisite: MUSC-189. (2 hours weekly)

MUSC-191 Class Voice I
2 Credits
Open to all interested students. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have a basic understanding of the vocal function in singing. Equally important is the development of poise and self-confidence as a performer as well as overcoming symptoms of performance anxiety. The main activity of this course is the development of the singing voice through exercise and song. The skills acquired in the class will serve as a foundation for more in-depth vocal study on the private level. (2 hours weekly plus additional independent practice time)

MUSC-192 Class Voice II
2 Credits
Class Voice II will be a continuation of Class Voice I. Prerequisite: MUSC-191. (2 hours weekly)

MUSC-193 Class Piano I
2 Credits
Open to all students, this course offers the student an opportunity to learn the basic principles of piano playing. Beginning with note reading, it progresses next to sight reading, technical exercises to aid in the development of skills used in the playing of the instrument, and ultimately, the addition of beginning piano repertoire. Small class size allows for individual attention and encourages independent progress. This class will also serve as a foundation for more in-depth study on the private level for those interested in pursuing further study. (3 hours weekly plus additional independent practice time)

MUSC-194 Class Piano II
2 Credits

Class Piano II will be a continuation of Class Piano I. Prerequisite: MUSC-193. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-195 Class Guitar I
2 Credits

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have a fundamental understanding of the basics of music reading and guitar playing. The main focus is the discipline of classical guitar technique and style with emphasis on ensemble music reading and individual development. Some instruction will be offered in other styles of guitar music. This class will serve as a foundation for more in-depth study on the private level. (3 hours weekly plus additional independent practice time)

MUSC-196 Class Guitar II
2 Credits

This course is a continuation of Class Guitar I. Prerequisite: MUSC-195. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-197 Pre-Professional Experience I
2 Credits

This course will serve as an orientation to the role of the music teacher in the school and community. It will aim to provide an introduction to music teaching for general music teachers and music specialists. It equips students with musical skills and a range of learning experiences and teaching strategies for use in the classroom. Students will be introduced to both theoretical and practical aspects of music and to music curriculum practices and procedures. On-site school visits at elementary, middle and high school levels form the basis for discussion and exploration of all facets of the music education profession. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-198 Pre-Professional Experience II
2 Credits

This course will serve as a continuation of MUSC-197 Pre-Professional Experience I and students will continue to explore the world of music education, through both theory and practice. It will continue laying a foundation for music education, focusing on secondary schools. It will equip students with musical skills and a range of learning experiences and teaching strategies for use in the secondary classroom. Regular on-site school visits at elementary, middle and high school levels form the basis for discussion and exploration of all facets of the music education profession. Prerequisite: MUSC-197. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-202 Music Literature in Context I
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course will blend both theoretical analyses of specific representative musical masterworks with an investigation into the works’ historical and stylistic context. To this end, there will be 1) study of specific historical readings, 2) analytical and historical study of certain pivotal masterworks of music and their composers, 3) student analyses of these works with an aim to understanding their architectural and organic lifeblood, how the works functioned within their composers’ oeuvre, and their historical context, and 4) student presentations of their findings. Prerequisite: MUSC-111. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-203 Music Literature in Context II
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course will blend both theoretical analyses of specific representative musical masterworks with an investigation into the works’ historical and stylistic context from the classical through the Middle to Late Twentieth Century. To this end, there will be 1) study of specific historical readings, 2) analytical and historical study of certain pivotal masterworks of music and their composers, 3) student analyses of these works with an aim to understanding their architectural and organic lifeblood, how the works functioned within their composers’ oeuvre, and their historical context, and 4) student presentations of their findings. Prerequisite: MUSC-202. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-207 Music Therapy Techniques
2 Credits

This course provides the student with an introduction to methods and techniques of music therapy through lecture and classroom experiences. Students will learn basic principles upon which music therapy techniques have been developed and practice these techniques in the classroom with their peers. Prerequisite: MUSC-161 and MUSC-162. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-208 Music Therapy in Education
3 Credits

Music Therapy in Education is designed to present and explore theoretical foundations as well as practical methods of the uses of music therapy in schools. This course will present an overview of music education and special education and examine the role of music therapy in schools. It is designed for music therapy students, music educators and special education teachers. Music therapy students will continue to expand their Music Therapy Professional Portfolios with papers, readings, observations and techniques. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-210 Music Theory, Musicianship, and Keyboard Skills III
4 Credits

Third in the four-semester Music Theory sequence required of music majors, Theory III builds on the concepts of analysis and, writing studied in MUSC-111. The student will develop knowledge and understanding of advanced tonal analysis, altered non-harmonic tones and secondary dominants, augmented and Neapolitan sixth chords, foreign modulations and extended chords. The study of form will be continued through chosen examples. All facets of ear training, sight singing, and keyboard skills will be continued. Prerequisite: MUSC-111. Corequisite: MUSC-210L. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, plus additional practice time weekly)

MUSC-211 Music Theory, Musicianship, and Keyboard Skills IV
4 Credits
The final course in the four-semester Music Theory sequence, Theory IV continues the study of harmonic concepts pursued in MUSC-210. The student will develop further knowledge and understanding of foreign modulations, extended chords, chromaticism, non-diatonic music and form through the study of the music of late nineteenth and twentieth century. An introduction to late Renaissance polyphony and eighteenth century counterpoint will also be included. The practice of sight singing, rhythm reading, melodic dictation, and keyboard skills will be continued. Prerequisite: MUSC-210. Corequisite: MUSC-211L. (4 hours lecture, 3 hours lab and additional practice time weekly)

MUSC-217 Applied Music III
2 Credits

Third semester of individual college level music study. Required for music major. Corequisite: MUSC-217L. (1 one-hour lesson per week, one hour lab weekly)

MUSC-218 Applied Music IV
2 Credits

Fourth semester of individual college level music study. Required for music major. Corequisite: MUSC-218L. (1 one-hour lesson per week, one hour lab weekly)

MUSC-219 Applied Music III
1 Credit

Third semester of individual study program. Corequisite: MUSC-219L. (1 half-hour lesson per week, one hour lab weekly)

MUSC-220 Applied Music IV
1 Credit

Fourth semester of individual study program. Corequisite: MUSC-220L. (1 half-hour lesson per week, one hour lab weekly)

MUSC-224 Music Therapy Practicum I
1 Credit

This two semester course sequence of MUSC- 224 and MUSC-225 Music Therapy Practicum II provides exposure to the clinical practice of music therapy through on-site visits with board-certified music therapists working in various settings both on and off campus. To obtain vital “hands on” experience, students will participate in weekly clinical experiences. Written assignments and classroom discussions will allow the students to gain clarity and insight into the practical experience of being a music therapist. Students will append their Music Therapy Professional Portfolios with practical techniques gained during clinical visits. Prerequisites: MUSC-161 and MUSC-162. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-225 Music Therapy Practicum II
1 Credit

This two-semester course sequence (with MUSC-224 Music Therapy Practicum I) provides exposure to the clinical practice of music therapy through on-site visits with board-certified music therapists working in various settings both on and off campus. To obtain vital “hands on” experience, students will participate in weekly clinical experiences. Written assignments and classroom discussions will allow the students to gain clarity and insight into the practical experience of being a music therapist. Students will append their Music Therapy Professional Portfolios with practical techniques gained during clinical visits. Prerequisite: MUSC-224. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-226 Lyric Diction III - German
2 Credits

The third in a series of courses designed for singers and choral conductors who wish to improve their linguistic skills and knowledge of German, as applied through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), as well as expanding their knowledge of standard vocal repertoire. Prerequisite: MUSC-127. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-227 Lyric Diction IV - French
2 Credits

The fourth in a series of courses designed for singers and choral conductors who wish to improve their linguistic skills and knowledge of French, as applied through the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), as well as expanding their knowledge of standard vocal repertoire. Prerequisite: MUSC-226. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-228 Audio Techniques I
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to audio recording, both the theory and practical applications. Through exercises and projects, students will study and work with the concepts and tools used in recording sound. Live recording and studio- based recording will both be emphasized. Prerequisite: MUSC-110, MUSC-110L, MUSC-111 and MUSC-111L. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-229 Audio Techniques II
3 Credits
A continuation of Audio Techniques I, this course explores audio recording using advanced mixing and audio processing, as well as advanced aspects of the digital and audio workstation. Students will utilize the tools and techniques of audio recording through exercises and projects in order to build experience and self confidence. All projects will be discussed in class in a supportive environment. Students are encouraged to make their final projects ambitious and collaborative with other students and programs. Prerequisite: MUSC-228. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-230 History of Western Art Music I: Ancient Worlds to the Baroque
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course will begin by introducing musical practices and thoughts of the ancient Greeks. Through a systematic and organized presentation of historical events, theoretical thoughts, musical practice, representative composers and their works, the students gain a comprehensive overview and knowledge in the unfolding stylistic development of Western Art Music through the Medieval Period to the middle of the Eighteenth century, commonly recognized as the end of the Baroque Period. Students enrolled in this class will be required to demonstrate a listening comprehension of the representative musical compositions covered in this class by completing an aural proficiency assessment successfully. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-231 History of Western Art Music II: Classical to End of Nineteenth Century
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Through a systematic and organized presentation of historical events, theoretical thoughts, musical practice, representative composers and their works, the students gain a comprehensive overview and knowledge in the unfolding stylistic development of Western Art Music from the Classical to the end of Nineteenth century. Students enrolled in this class will be required to demonstrate a listening comprehension of the representative musical compositions covered in this class by completing an aural proficiency assessment successfully. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-232 History of Western Art Music III: The Twentieth Century
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Through a systematic and organized presentation of historical events, theoretical thoughts, musical practice, representative composers and their works, the students gain a comprehensive overview and knowledge in the unfolding stylistic development of Western Art Music in the Twentieth century. Students enrolled in this class will be required to demonstrate a listening comprehension of the representative musical compositions covered in this class by completing an aural proficiency assessment successfully. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-234 Tunes in ‘Toons
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Open to all interested students, this course provides an introduction to classical music through cartoons. Emphasis will be given to specific genres of classical music, musical historical periods, the connection of classical music to other arts, and aesthetics. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to identify specific classical composers and explain their importance from a global and historical perspective, recognize and define specific genres of classical music, and write and speak clearly about the aesthetics of classical music. This course will enhance the students’ appreciation of classical music in a unique and memorable way. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-238 Music and Sound Creation I
3 Credits

Musicians and composers use a variety of electronic instruments and computer-based tools to compose music and create sounds that are used in all types of media. In this course, students will learn to utilize computer-based tools along with music and sound creation techniques. Class will be held in a computer lab and coursework will be hands-on and project-based. Current commercial and artistic uses of electronic music and sound will be analyzed and critical listening skills developed. Creativity and compositional techniques will be discussed along with the concerns of professional working musicians and composers. Students will begin the process of creating their own palette of creation techniques and experiences in a supportive environment. Prerequisites: MUSC-110, MUSC-110L, MUSC-111 and MUSC-111L. (3 hours weekly)

MUSC-239 Music and Sound Creation II
3 Credits
A continuation of Music and Sound Creation I, in this course, students will continue to build experience in the use of computer-based tools along with music and sound creation techniques to create projects for specific situations. Projects will be both individual and collaborative. Advanced topics in creativity will be discussed and students will be required to research advanced creation techniques. Students will begin to create music and sound files that can be used to start a professional portfolio. The two-semester sequence will culminate in a capstone project created by the student in collaboration with the instructor and fellow students. Prerequisite: MUSC-238. (3 hours weekly)


NURSING

NURS-099 Transition into Nursing I
1 Credit
At the completion of this course the student will utilize major theoretical and clinical constructs required of a student in the Howard Community College Nurse Education Program. The course will focus on the framework of Responses to Stress and its application to written assignments, the approach to theory and to clinical functioning. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Nurse Education Program at a level higher than NURS-122/NURS-123.

NURS-103 Transition into Nursing II
6 Credits

At the completion of this course, students will be capable of applying theory to provide safe care for patients with common health problems. Selection of nursing actions is directed at variations resulting from five major categories of patient responses to stress (immobility, obstruction, infection, bleeding and alterations in perception). Prerequisites: Admission into the LPN Pathway and completion of BIOL-204, ENGL-121, HMDV-200, PSYC-101, and Mathematics Core.

NURS-122 Foundations of Nursing Practice
8 Credits

The student will develop and attain attitudes, knowledge and skills, both interpersonal and psychomotor, which are necessary to assist the patient in meeting health care needs. The curriculum framework and influence of the stress-adaptation process on basic needs and nursing care is emphasized. The student will select general nursing actions and develop competencies required to deliver safe, technical nursing care to patients in long-term and acute care settings. Prerequisite: Formal admission into the ADN Program or PN Certificate option. Specific admission criteria exist for the accelerated program. Prerequisites for ADN Nursing Program: BIOL-107, BIOL-203, CHEM 103, MATH-122, 138 or higher. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL-204, HMDV-200. Prerequisites for PN Certificate track: BIOL-107, BIOL-203, MATH-105. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL-204, HMDV-200. (5 hours theory, 3 hours lab weekly)

NURS-123 Foundations of Nursing Practice for the Experienced Health Care Provider
7 Credits

The student will develop and attain attitudes, knowledge and skills, both interpersonal and psychomotor, which are necessary to assist the patient in meeting health care needs. The curriculum framework and influence of the stress-adaptation process on basic needs and nursing care is emphasized. The student will select general nursing actions and develop competencies required to deliver safe, technical nursing care to patients in long-term and acute care settings. Prerequisite: Formal admission into the ADN Program or PN Certificate option and specific health care experience requirements. Prerequisites for ADN Nursing Program: BIOL-107, BIOL-203, CHEM 103, MATH-122, 138 or higher. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL-204, HMDV-200. Prerequisites for PN Certificate track: BIOL-107, BIOL-203, MATH-105. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL-204, HMDV-200. (5 hours theory, 2 hours lab weekly)

NURS-134 Family Centered Nursing I
4 Credits

This course introduces the student to contemporary perspectives on the health care of women and the childbearing family. Students will develop competencies required to administer safe, technical nursing care to patients with both common and complex health care needs. Utilizing the curriculum framework, the student will examine patient responses to stress and will select nursing actions to meet patient needs. Prerequisites: NURS-122 or NURS-123, BIOL-204, HMDV-200. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL-121 and PSYC-101. (2.75 hours theory, 1.25 hours lab weekly)

NURS-135 Medical-Surgical Nursing I
4 Credits

Building on theoretical knowledge and clinical competencies from NURS-122 or NURS-123, the student will develop competencies required to administer safe, technical nursing care to patients experiencing complex health problems. Utilizing the curriculum framework, the student will examine patient responses to stress and will select general nursing actions to meet patient needs. Prerequisites: NURS-122 or NURS-123, BIOL-204, HMDV-200. Pre- or corequisite: ENGL-121 and PSYC-101. (2.5 hours theory, 1.5 hours lab weekly)

NURS-140 Advanced Concepts in Practical Nursing
5 Credits

This course will prepare the practical nurse student to provide care for individuals of all ages experiencing more complex health care problems resulting from the major responses to stress. The student will explore the role of the practical nurse in health care and utilize the steps of the nursing process to provide safe nursing care to a small group of patients. Experience in managing the care provided by auxiliary nursing personnel will be integrated into clinical assignments. Successful completion of this course includes success on the exit examination. Prerequisites: NURS-134 and NURS-135, PSYC-101, ENGL-121. (3 hours theory, 2 hours lab weekly)

NURS-170 Nursing Co-Op Work Experience
3 Credits

See COOP-201-202 Cooperative Education Work Experience I and II.

NURS-230 Trends in Nursing
1 Credit

This course provides the nursing student with an overview of the current trends and issues occurring in nursing and health care including health care financing and economics, the health care delivery system, legal and ethical issues, health policy and politics. Students will be challenged to examine how these issues and other current events shape nursing practice. Prerequisites: NURS-134 and NURS-135. (1 hour theory weekly)

NURS-234 Family Centered Nursing II
4 Credits

Building on theoretical knowledge and clinical competencies from NURS-134, the student will gain greater proficiency in caring for patients within the family unit. Nursing care is most effective when it is delivered with the belief that the family is the patient. The child is an essential member of the family unit. The curriculum framework will help students examine responses to and nursing interventions to meet the needs of the child and family. Students will develop competencies required to administer safe, technical nursing care with an emphasis on caring for children with a holistic approach to the family unit. Prerequisites: NURS-134 and NURS-135, PSYC-101. Pre- or corequisite: SOCI-101. (2.75 hours theory, 1.25 hours lab weekly)

NURS-235 Nursing Care of Patients in Community and Mental Health Settings
4 Credits

This course will introduce students to psychiatric mental health nursing and community-based nursing practice. Students will examine concepts specific to community and mental health nursing and apply the nursing process to clients experiencing an alteration in perception and clients requiring community support services. Students will develop competencies required to administer safe, technical nursing care to patients. Prerequisites: NURS-134 and NURS-135 or NURS-233 and NURS-234, PSYC-101. Pre- or corequisite: SOCI-101. (2.15 hours theory, 1.85 hours lab weekly)

NURS-240 Medical-Surgical Nursing II
8 Credits

Building on theoretical knowledge and clinical competencies from previous nursing courses, the student will gain greater proficiency in caring for patients experiencing complex health problems. Students will utilize the curriculum framework to plan and provide patient-centered care. Theoretical study and clinical application of knowledge will also focus on leadership and management in nursing to promote quality patient care outcomes. Students will demonstrate competencies required to administer safe, technical nursing care and gain experience in managing care for a small group of patients. Upon successful completion of this course, to include success on the exit examination, students will be prepared to assume entry-level roles as associate degree nurses in caring for patients with diverse health needs. Prerequisites: NURS-234, NURS-235. Pre- or corequisite: NURS-230 and Humanities, Arts & Literature Core Courses. (4.3 hours theory, 3.7 hours lab weekly)


NUTRITION

NUTR-211 Nutrition
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course focuses on the basic concepts of nutrition and the application of nutritional principles to wellness across the lifespan. It will provide students with a general understanding of nutrition and health, the functions and importance of fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals, and the relationship between nutrition and exercise in weight management. Students will complete a detailed computerized dietary analysis project. (3 hours weekly)

NUTR-212 Food: Science and Technology
3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce students to the basic chemical, physical, and microbiological aspects of food and the integration of basic sciences in the food industry. Students will examine the scientific, technical, and practical aspects involved with the harvest, storage, manufacture, preservation, packaging, distribution, and marketing of food products. Discussion of current food controversies and scientific literature will be integrated throughout the course. (3 hours weekly)


OFFICE TECHNOLOGY

OFFI-100 Office Machines
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use a business calculator with proficiency. The student will be able to add, subtract, multiply, divide, use whole numbers and fractions, do accumulative and constant multiplication and division, percentages, complements and chain discounts, gross and net profit, mark up, proration and interest problems. Emphasis is placed on the ability to take basic machine operations and apply them to practical business math problems. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks.

OFFI-102 Editing Skills
3 Credits
After successful completion of this course, the student will improve his or her proofreading and spelling skills and develop a business vocabulary. This will include learning proofreading techniques and capitalization, grammar, punctuation, spelling, and word usage principles. An intensive study of spelling rules is included. This course does not take the place of an English course; it is a review (brush-up) of previously acquired skills. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class. Prerequisite: OFFI‑177.

OFFI-104 Data Entry
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to input data in real-world applications while building alphanumeric and numeric keyboarding speed and accuracy. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work (except tests) may be done outside of class if student has compatible software. The student should have a minimum typing speed of 30 words a minute before starting this course.

OFFI-177 Grammar for Your Job
2 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use the principles of English grammar in both spoken and written communications.

OFFI-201 Office Technology Work Experience
3 or 4 Credits

See COOP-201 Cooperative Education Work Experience I.

OFFI-270 Medical Transcription Techniques
3 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to apply the fundamentals of medical transcription including document formats and grammar and punctuation rules when transcribing letters, chart notes, emergency room notes, history and physical exams, and operative and specialty reports. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class. Prerequisites: OFFI-290 and CMSY-102.

OFFI-275 Office Simulation
3 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to use Word, Excel, Access, and Power Point to complete office simulation projects. This will include setting priorities, organizing tasks, problem solving and researching on the Web. In addition, general office procedures are included. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class. Prerequisites: CMSY‑101, CMSY-103, CMSY-104, CMSY-116, and CMSY‑126.

OFFI-279 Keyboarding
1 Credit

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to touch type and use correct keyboard technique. Speed and accuracy development are stressed. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All work for this course (except graded speed and accuracy tests) may be done outside of class.

OFFI-280 Legal Transcription and Terminology
3 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to transcribe legal material from prerecorded dictation while obtaining an overview of legal procedures and acquiring an in-depth knowledge of terminology. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. Approximately 50% of the work for this course may be done outside of class. Prerequisite: OFFI-281.

OFFI-281 Legal Document Preparation
2 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to prepare various legal forms and documents using Microsoft Word. Included is an introduction to legal terminology and procedures. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class if the student has compatible word processing software. Prerequisite: CMSY-104.

OFFI-290 Medical Terminology
2 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to spell and define medical prefixes, suffixes, and terminology peculiar to various medical specialties. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class.

OFFI-293 Beginning Medical Transcription
3 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to transcribe medical reports from prerecorded, dictated material. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be done outside of class. Prerequisite: OFFI-270.

OFFI-297 Advanced Medical Transcription
3 Credits

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to transcribe medical reports from prerecorded, dictated material that is more rigorous and covers more medical specialties and reports than the dictation in OFFI-293 Beginning Medical Transcription. This course may be completed in fewer than 14 weeks. All of the work for this course (except tests) may be completed outside of class. Prerequisite: OFFI-293.


PHILOSOPHY

PHIL-101 Introduction to Philosophy
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

An introduction to world philosophy which begins with the western tradition and includes Asian and African philosophies as well as the voices of women philosophers and the peoples of the Americas. Focus is on major theories of reality (metaphysics), knowledge (epistemology), value (axiology), and logic. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

PHIL-102 Introduction to Logic
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

An introduction to both the practice and study of reason. Taking the essence of reason to be argument–a set of premises supporting a conclusion–the basic notions of validity, truth, soundness, strength and cogency will be studied and applied to ordinary language, culminating in a survey of what are know as informal fallacies. Two elements of formal symbolic logic will then be studied and practiced: categorical syllogism (Aristotelian and Boolean) and propositional logic (not including predicate logic). These elements have a distinctly mathematical feel; the final element of the course will return to a less formally rigorous study of inductive logic, scientific method and reason in general. (3 hours weekly)

PHIL-103 Introduction to Ethics
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

Upon completion of this course students will be familiar with most important ethical theories of Western philosophy. Students will have the necessary tools to discuss and evaluate various contemporary moral issues, as well as a moral ethical stance. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

PHIL-104 Introduction to Religious Studies
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

An introduction to the academic study of religion which explores the nature and variety of religious experience, the role of religion in the lives of individuals and communities, forms of ritual/rites/worship, the use of myths, symbols, and practices in guiding everyday living, religion’s role in the construction of meaning, and the reciprocal relationship between religion and culture. Drawing on insights from the humanities and social sciences, this course is interdisciplinary in focus and worldwide in scope, covering religious experience in Asia, Africa, and the West. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

PHIL-110 Introduction to Chinese Taoism
1 Credit
An interdisciplinary introduction to Chinese Taoism, using the methods and categories of philosophy but including the historical and cultural milieu of China, traditional Chinese landscape painting as expressive of Taoist philosophy and an examination of the wisdom texts Tao Te Ching and Chuang-tzu. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (1 hour weekly)

PHIL-111 Introduction to Japanese Zen Buddhism
1 Credit

An interdisciplinary introduction to Japanese Zen Buddhism, using the categories and methods of philosophy but including the historical and cultural milieu of Japan, Zen painting, haiku, and sand gardens, and ancient, medieval, and modern Zen wisdom texts from around the world. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (1 hour weekly)

PHIL-112 Introduction to African Philosophy
1 Credit
An interdisciplinary introduction to African philosophy using the categories and methods of Western philosophy but including the historical and cultural milieu of Africa as well as African visual arts and proverbs, African drumming, dance, and song as repositories of and ways to express African philosophy. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (1 hour weekly)

PHIL-116 Fundamentals of Spiritual Awareness
3 Credits

This course, based on Eastern thought, will provide the student the tools to understand one’s spiritual nature. Major topics include states of consciousness, the subconscious mind, thoughts and attitudes, death and dying. Students will learn the connection between the chakras (energy body) and the physical body. Various meditation and visualization techniques will be experienced. The student will also have the opportunity to explore intuition, dreams, and synchronicity. Upon completion of this course one will gain an understanding of spirituality, self-awareness, and self-responsibility. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-116.

PHIL-140 The Philosophy and Practice of Tai Chi
3 Credits

This course is designed to provide the student with the skills necessary to instruct the martial art of Tai Chi. The student will be provided with the means of developing the physical and teaching skills needed to instruct the Beijing or Simplified Form of Tai Chi for fitness and stress management. (4 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED‑140.

PHIL-141 The Philosophy and Practice of Yoga
3 Credits

This introductory course in Yogic philosophy is unique in that it interweaves the intellectual and the experiential, so that the ancient yet timely truths and principles of Yoga are studied, explored, and practiced through Yoga postures, breath, awareness, reflection, writing, discussion, meditation, and action. (4 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED‑141.

PHIL-201 Religions of the World
3 Credits (Humanities Core)
A study of the major religions of the world with emphasis on their origins, development, and significance in the modern world as well as their sacred texts. Focus is on Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Judiaism, Christianity, and Islam. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

PHIL-202 Critical Thinking and Creative Problem Solving
3 Credits (Humanities Core)
Students will study ideas designed to help them improve their thinking skills of thinking critically, reasoning clearly, using language precisely, and creatively solving problems. The importance of solid evidence and logical reasoning will be studied in a variety of contexts. Emphasis will also be on applying thinking skills to everyday practical problems, academic problems, personal problems, and social problems. Primary and secondary sources will be used from newspapers, books, television, and other media. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

PHIL-203 Civility and the Virtue Tradition
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

This course examines the intersection of civility and the virtue tradition in philosophy. As our ancient world cultures have acknowledged, both individual happiness and a harmonious society depend on the cultivation of a virtuous character. Using written texts (including P.M. Forni’s Choosing Civility), films, and literature, the focus is on the costs of incivility and the benefits of civility. Drawing on insights from the humanities and the arts, this course is interdisciplinary in focus and worldwide in scope, covering civility and the virtue tradition in Asia, Africa, and the West. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HUMN-203.

PHIL-230 Philosophy of the Martial Arts
3 Credits

This course will examine the philosophical bases of the martial arts of the world, including those of Ancient Greece and Rome, Southeast Asia, East Asia, Africa, South America, Europe, and North America. The impact various philosophical systems have had on the development of the martial arts will be investigated. Conversely, the influence martial arts may have had on the development of the philosophical systems themselves will be reviewed. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as EXSC-230.

PHIL-260 Film and Philosophy
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

An exploration and comparison of philosophical approaches explored within the art form of film. Focus is on major theories of reality (metaphysics), knowledge (epistemology) and value (axiology) and on the canons of film studies. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-260.


PHOTONICS

PHOT-100 Introduction to Photonics
3 Credits

Introduction to Photonics explores the fundamentals of photonics theory including concepts, applications in the workplace, and career opportunities. Photonics is defined as the controlled flow of light particles (photons) used in the generation, manipulation, transport, detection, and use of light information and energy. This course will explore the production and nature of light including: the laws of reflection and refraction, theory of image formation, principles of wave optics (including interference, diffraction and polarization), fundamentals of fiber optic theory, principles of lasers and laser safety, and the basics of holography with image processing. Concepts will be reinforced through demonstrations, classroom activities, and take­home lab and written exercises. Throughout the course, emphasis will be placed on applications of photonics in medicine, transportation, manufacturing, communications, environmental monitoring and consumer devices. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH‑064. (3 hours weekly)

PHOT-105 Optical Physics
4 Credits

This course covers basic optical theory (both geometric and physical (wave) optics) and its components. Geometrical optics deals with the treatment of light as a ray and will help the student to understand the basics of light reflection and refraction. These principles will be applied to the study of image formation, lenses, mirrors, aberrations, prisms, fibers, optical system design and optical instruments. Physical optics introduces the wave nature of light and the consequences of this behavior. Topics studied include interference, diffraction, polarization, interferometry, spectroscopy, etc. There will also be an introduction to: thin film coatings to enhance or suppress reflection; the operation of such devices as gratings, polarizers, quarter‑wave plates, etc.; and the study of optical image processing and display devices. A lab component will parallel the lectures and provide hands‑on experience handling optical equipment. In the laboratory, the student will develop the ability to appraise, use and interpret data to express mathematically and explain (often using a model) the physical phenomena involved. Prerequisites: MATH-143 or higher and PHOT-100. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHOT-200 Principles of Lasers
3 Credits
This course covers the basic principles of laser operations and applications with particular emphasis on laser safety. Beginning with an introduction to incoherent and coherent light sources, the structure of the atom, emission processes, and stimulated emission of radiation will be studied. Next, laser output characteristics and modification, laser materials and components, and common types of industrial lasers will be studied. Included is an overview of major industrial laser applications (e.g. Telecommunications). Safety and laboratory procedures are also covered. The lab experiments will closely follow, reinforce, and extend the classroom material. Prerequisites: MATH‑143 or higher and PHOT‑105. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHOT-205 Detection and Measurement
3 Credits

This course will provide the student with a working knowledge of the various devices and techniques for evaluating optical systems. This course covers basic concepts of fiber optic measurement techniques. Measurement of power, spectrum analyzer, and wavelength meters will be used to measure optical spectral measurements. Topics include the applications and use of spectrometers, monochromators, spectrophotometers, and Michelson, Febry-Perot, Twyman‑Green, Mach-Zender interferometers to measure wavelengths, absorption of wavelengths, defect in lenses, prisms, and flat plates. Hands-on lab will help the students to understand the concepts better. Prerequisites: ELEC‑117 and PHOT-105. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHOT-210 Fiber Optics Communications
4 Credits

This course provides the student with a theoretical and hands-on background in fiber optics communications. Topics will include a basic overview of light and optics, total internal reflection, basic waveguide propagation, singlemode, and multimode fiber, fiber optics loss mechanisms, splicing and termination, loss testing, OTDR usage, lasers and DWDM, and optical network design. Hands-on lab experience will help the students to understand the concepts better. Prerequisite: PHOT-105. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHOT-220 Advanced Topics in Photonics
3 Credits

As the field of photonics rapidly evolves, new technologies will be introduced to keep the student abreast of the state of the art in the photonics industry. Students will be introduced to advanced topics, as per their area of interest, such as integrated optical devices, holography, advanced laser topics, optical switches, Dense Wavelength‑Division Multiplexing (DWDM), etc., in a seminar format. Guest speakers will be invited to present and supplement the classroom seminars. Each student will be required to pursue individual areas of interest culminating in a mentored applications‑oriented photonics project and presentation to the class. Emphasis is placed on selecting, planning, implementing, testing and presenting the project. Prerequisites: ELEC-213 and PHOT-200. (3 hours weekly)


PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANT

PTAP-100 Introduction to Physical Therapy
2 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the role of a physical therapist assistant in the healthcare delivery system. History and organization of the physical therapy profession, standards of practice, laws and regulations, the interdisciplinary healthcare team, ethics, and accessing research/healthcare literature will be covered. Prerequisite: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program. Corequisite: PTAP-110. (2 hours weekly)

PTAP-110 Fundamentals of Practice I
3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the skills needed to care for patients in varied settings. This course will include body measurements, range of motion, vital signs, lifting and transfers, draping and positioning, documentation guidelines, manual muscle testing, posture and body alignment, assistive devices, and the pre-ambulatory patient. Prerequisites: Admission to the Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) program and BIOL-203. Corequisite: PTAP-100. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-120 Clinical Kinesiology
3 Credits

This course will present advanced anatomy of the musculoskeletal system with emphasis on joint mechanics, human movement, and palpation of anatomical landmarks. The student will learn the principles of normal and abnormal posture and gait. Prerequisites: BIOL-204, PTAP-100, and PTAP-110. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-130 Therapeutic Modalities I
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the use of physical modalities for patient treatment. The principles of inflammation, cell repair, pain, and pain management will be introduced. The student will learn the physics, physiology, indications, contraindications, application, and patient preparation for the use of heat, cold, ultrasound, massage, vasocompression, wound care, hydrotherapy, and phonophoresis. Prerequisites: BIOL-204, PTAP-100, and PTAP-110. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-150 Clinical Pathology
3 Credits

This course describes the etiology, signs, symptoms, and treatment of diseases and disorders commonly encountered in physical therapy. Prerequisites: BIOL-204, PTAP-100, and PTAP-110. (3 hours weekly)

PTAP-160 Orthopedic Dysfunctions I
3 Credits

This course will present the principles of tissue development, healing, and response to physical therapy treatments. Common cervical spine and upper extremity orthopedic diagnosis, physical therapy interventions, and post-operative and injury care protocols will be discussed. Prerequisites: BIOL-204, PTAP-100, and PTAP-110. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-210 Fundamentals of Practice II
3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to physical disabilities and community barriers. Independent activities of daily living, prosthetics, orthotics, static/dynamic splints, casts, and braces will be discussed. Also included will be relaxation training, pulmonary function, airway clearance techniques, breathing exercises, functional assessment, functional exercise, balance assessment, and balance training. Prerequisites: BIOL-204, PTAP-100, and PTAP-110. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-213 Clinical Education I
2 Credits
This course consists of a review of Healthcare Provider-level CPR and First Aid, HIPAA, OSHA Hazard Communication (includes bloodborne pathogen), and introduction to the clinic during the first two weeks of the semester, followed by weekly on-site clinical experience in local settings. The course will allow for observation of physical therapy interventions and application of elemental principles of patient care to uncomplicated patients under direct supervision and at the discretion of the Clinical Instructor. Prerequisites: PTAP-100 and PTAP-110. Corequisites: PTAP-120, PTAP-130, PTAP-150, PTAP-160, and PTAP-210. (8 hours clinical weekly)

PTAP-214 Clinical Education II
2 Credits

This course consists of a clinical experience at one clinical site. The students will have the opportunity to apply skills and knowledge developed in previous coursework in the technical program. Prerequisites: PTAP-120, PTAP-150, PTAP-160, PTAP-210, and PTAP-213. (8 hours clinical weekly)

PTAP-230 Therapeutic Modalities II
3 Credits

This course continues with the study of physics, physiology, indications, contraindications, and patient preparation for the use of modalities. Focus will be on electromagnetic modalities including iontophoresis, biofeedback, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), neuromuscular electrical stimulation, high volt, interferential, and microcurrent. The course will also include mechanical traction, continuous passive motion, and laser. Prerequisite: PTAP-214. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-240 Therapeutic Exercise
3 Credits

This course covers the principles of exercise physiology, the application of exercise to treatment plans and injury prevention, equipment and exercise interventions to improve flexibility, strength, and motor control, special topics in women’s health, and cardiovascular function. Prerequisite: PTAP-214. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-250 Clinical Neuroscience
3 Credits

This course focuses on nervous system anatomy and function, and normal/abnormal development. Students also learn assessment of the neurologically impaired patient and therapeutic approaches to central nervous system dysfunctions throughout the life cycle. Prerequisite: PTAP-214. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-260 Orthopedic Dysfunctions II
3 Credits

This course presents common lower-extremity and thoracolumbar spine orthopedic diagnosis and physical therapy interventions. Post-operative and injury care protocols are discussed. Prerequisite: PTAP-214. (2.25 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PTAP-265 Professional Issues in Physical Therapy
1 Credit
This seminar covers topics relevant to professional development and communication. Topics include cultural competence, learning and communication styles, and ethical and legal aspects of care. The structure and function of institutions, reimbursement systems, wellness, and special topics in health care will be discussed. Employment topics will include resume writing, interviewing, and performance appraisals. Work and life issues will be covered. Corequisites: PTAP-230, PTAP-240, PTAP-250, and PTAP-260. (1 hour weekly)

PTAP-270 Clinical Education III
4 Credits

This course consists of a full-time clinical rotation at one clinical site. The student will apply skills and knowledge from all previous coursework to patient care with the purpose of developing entry-level clinical competency. Clinical competencies will be continued. An oral presentation will be presented to the staff. The clinical site may require travel away from the local region, including out-of-state. Prerequisites: PTAP-230, PTAP-240, PTAP-250, PTAP-260, and PTAP-265. (16 hours clinical weekly)

PTAP-275 Clinical Education IV
4 Credits

This course consists of a full-time clinical rotation at one clinical site. The student will continue to apply skills and knowledge obtained from all previous coursework and clinical experiences. Clinical competencies must be completed by the end of this rotation. An oral presentation will be presented to the staff that differs from Clinical Education III. A one-day review of clinical questions and licensure exam details will follow the end of the clinical. Location of clinical sites may require travel away from the local region, including out-of-state. Prerequisite: PTAP-270. (16 hours clinical weekly)


PHYSICS
Also see listings in Astronomy and Geology.

PHYS-101  Technical Physical Science
4 Credits (Science Core)

This Technical Physics course is designed for technology majors such as BMET, Cardiovascular, Computer Support, Electronics, and Telecommunications Technology. It consists of basic scientific math and an integrated sequence of physical and chemical principles. This course will enable the student to become aware of, to identify, and to evaluate situations and/or problems in contemporary physical science which include: basic chemical and physical principles with applications to the human body; properties and states of matter; science measurement and dimensional plus statistical analysis techniques. Special emphasis is placed upon learning physics principles and solving mathematical problems in density/specific gravity, gas laws, solutions, pressure, work and energy, fluids, basic electricity, waves, sound, magnetism, and the atom. The laboratory program will allow the student to develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of the above mentioned areas, including problem solving, and their application to physical phenomenon observed. Prerequisite: MATH-061. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHYS-103 Fundamentals of Physics I
4 Credits (Science Core)

Physics 103, a course designed mainly for science majors and pre-professional students, will enable the student to solve problems involving the major concepts in physics to include measurement: vector concepts; forces; mechanics (both statics and dynamics); fluids; heat concepts; and some thermodynamics. The students will develop the ability to interpret and apply the experimental laws and fundamental principles of physics to describe the behavior of the physical world. In the laboratory program, the student will develop the ability to appraise, use, and interpret data collected (often by MBL) to express mathematically and/or explain the physical phenomena observed. Pre- or corequisite: MATH-153, MATH-155 or higher. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHYS-104 Fundamentals of Physics II
4 Credits (Science Core)

Physics 104, a course designed mainly for science majors and preprofessional students, will enable the student to solve problems involving the major concepts in physics to include wave motion, sound, electrostatics, electric currents, circuits, electronics, magnetism, electromagnetic interactions, nature and properties of light, optics, and some modern physics. The student will develop the ability to interpret and apply the experimental laws and fundamental principles of physics to describe the behavior of the physical world. In the laboratory program, the student will develop the ability to appraise, use and interpret data collected (often by MBL) to express mathematically and/or explain the physical phenomena observed. Prerequisites: PHYS-103, and MATH-143 and MATH-153, or MATH-155, or higher. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHYS-106 Earth and Space Science
4 Credits (Science Core)

This is a course designed for non-science majors which is a general survey of basic earth science and astronomy topics. This course will enable the student to learn basic concepts of soils, groundwater, weather and the hydrological cycle, urban geology, rocks and minerals, historical geology, plate tectonics, scale of the solar system, historical astronomy, basic motions of the earth plus celestial bodies, constellation identification, planet evolution and characteristics, space satellites, telescopes, the sun, stellar properties and evolution, and galaxies and cosmology. In the laboratory, the student will develop skill with basic equipment, laboratory techniques and procedures plus investigative skills to solve science-related problems. Field work will involve investigation of geology sites, constellation identification, and trips to local museums/planetariums. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHYS-107 Physical Science
4 Credits (Science Core)

PHYS-107 is a course designed for the Elementary Education A.A.T. students and the non-science major. It is a general survey of the contributions of physics and chemistry to man’s understanding of basic physical science concepts and will expose the student to the basic scientific vocabulary. In laboratory, students will develop skill with equipment, laboratory techniques and procedures, plus lab investigative skills to solve physics and chemistry-related problems. The lab emphasis is on the application of basic physical science principles in studying and solving problems plus the operation of basic equipment. Basic math skills will be needed to illustrate some of these principles. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in MATH-070. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHYS-110 General Physics I (Calculus)
4 Credits (Science Core)

General Physics 110 is the first semester of a three-semester calculus-based physics course mainly for physics, physical science, engineering and related science majors. The course will enable the student to solve problems, using calculus methods when applicable, for the major concepts in physics to include: measurement; vector concepts; laws of motion, force, energy; principles of mechanics and statics; linear momentum; gravitation; oscillations; rotation; and vibrations. The student will develop the ability to interpret and apply the experimental laws and fundamental principles of physics to describe the behavior of the physical world. In the laboratory program, the student will develop the ability to appraise, use, and interpret data collected (often by MBL) to express mathematically and/or explain the physical phenomena observed. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121; Pre- or corequisite: MATH-140 or MATH-181. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHYS-111 General Physics II (Calculus)
4 Credits (Science Core)

General Physics 111 is the second semester of a three-semester, calculus-based physics course. The course will enable the student to solve problems, using calculus methods when applicable, for the major concepts in physics to include: heat; kinetic theory of gases; thermodynamics; waves; electrostatics; DC and AC circuits; magnetism; electromagnetic interactions, and electromagnetic radiation. The student will develop the ability to interpret and apply the experimental laws and fundamental principles of physics to describe the behavior of the physical world. In the laboratory program, the student will develop the ability to appraise, use and interpret data collected (often by MBL) to express mathematically and/or explain the physical phenomena observed. Prerequisite: PHYS-110; Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121; Pre- or corequisite: MATH-150 or MATH-182. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

PHYS-112 General Physics III (Calculus)
3 Credits

General Physics 112 is the final semester of a three-semester calculus-based physics course. The course will enable the student to solve problems, using calculus methods when applicable, for the major concepts in physics to include: wave motion; sound waves; superposition; standing waves; advanced electromagnetic wave theory including Maxwell’s Equations; geometric and some physical optics; special theory of relativity; and topics in modern physics. In the laboratory/recitation program, the student will develop the ability to appraise, use and interpret data collected to express mathematically and/or explain the physical phenomena involved. Prerequisite: MATH-150 or MATH-182 and PHYS-111, and eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)


POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLI-101 American Federal Government
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will evaluate and critically analyze the following areas of American Government: first, the origins, principles and interpretation of the American Constitution including the tensions between federalism and nationalism; secondly, politics and the people: public opinion, political parties, elections and interest groups; thirdly, the institutions of government which include the presidency, congress, judiciary and federal bureaucracy; fourthly, issues in public policy including economic policy, foreign policy and social issues such as crime, energy, obscenity, and affirmative action. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

POLI-102 State and Local Government
3 Credits
The student will evaluate, debate, and critically analyze the public policies which emerge from the political processes of state and local government by examining the following: (1) the constraints on state and local governments in making and implementing policy; (2) the policy roles of the legislative, executive, judicial, and administrative branches; (3) the successes and failures of state and local governments in dealing with the following public policy areas - criminal justice, welfare, education, housing, transportation, and the environment; (4) the role of citizen influence on public policy and an examination of some alternatives to the conventional channels of state and local government. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

POLI-201 Comparative Government
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The student will be able to compare and contrast the political, military, social, and economic characteristics of governments in three different environments. They are: nations in transition (developing Third World States to be selected in class); countries in a western democratic setting (United States, Britain and France) and post Cold War communist governments. The student will also be able to examine and evaluate modern political thought and ideologies such as rational philosophies; liberal and conservative doctrines; socialistic and Marxist ideologies; Fascism, anarchism, terrorism and nationalism. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

POLI-202 International Relations and Contemporary Foreign Policy
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences/Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the study of American foreign policy. The course will explore the nature of foreign policy, the idea of national interest, the historic impulses driving foreign policy in the US, the crucial historical challenges shaping American foreign policy, the institutional context of American foreign policy and will investigate the principle challenges facing American policy makers today and in the future. Prerequisite ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)


PORTUGUESE

PORT-101 Elementary Portuguese I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this introductory course, students learn to listen, speak, write and read at a basic level. They also learn about the diverse cultures of the Portuguese-speaking world. In class instruction focuses on oral/aural skill development. Writing and reading skills will be developed through assigned work. (4 hours weekly)

PORT-102 Elementary Portuguese II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)
PORT-102 is a continuation of beginning Portuguese. Students continue to develop the four basic language skills, particularly oral communication. Students will look inside the cultures of the Portuguese speaking world. They will develop a project that reflects personal goals for learning Portuguese. (4 hours weekly)


PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC-101 General Psychology
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

Through this introduction to the field of psychology, the student will be able to describe how psychologists do their research and gain an appreciation of how psychologists view people through studying the views of Freud, Skinner, and Maslow. The student will be able to summarize, interpret and evaluate psychological information, especially as it appears in films and non­‑technical articles. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to describe psychological concepts and facts on the major topics of psychology. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

PSYC-102 Advanced General Psychology
3 Credits

After studying the topics of abnormal psychology, learning, psychological research methods, intelligence, social psychology, and aggression, the student will be able to objectively describe behavior, distinguish between normal and abnormal behavior, apply basic learning concepts and principles, critically evaluate secondary psychological sources, write a psychological research paper, identify important issues and problems concerning research, describe research on a variety of psychological topics and critique an article on a current social issue. This course is designed primarily for persons who are interested in taking additional psychology courses or wish an introduction to scientific psychology. Students may proceed through this course at their own pace. Prerequisite: PSYC-101. (3 hours weekly)

PSYC-202 Social Psychology
3 Credits

In addition to understanding and applying major concepts, facts, principles, and theories of social psychology, the student will be able to interpret, analyze and critically evaluate social psychological materials. The student will be able to explain the important research on these topics: T-groups, conformity, obedience, attraction, attitude change, cognitive dissonance, prejudice, and aggression. Students will study several social psychological topics of their own choosing. Prerequisite: PSYC-101. (3 hours weekly)

PSYC-203 Abnormal Psychology
3 Credits

Through this introduction to the field of abnormal psychology, the student will be able to describe both historical and current issues involved with defining and recognizing mental illness, to describe the causes of mental illness, to compare and contrast the major treatments of mental illness, and to describe some of the ways to prevent mental illness. In addition, the student will learn to be more critical of abnormal psychology information as found in the mass media. Prerequisite: PSYC-101. (3 hours weekly)

PSYC-204 Adolescent Psychology
3 Credits

This course is a description of adolescent development based on research and theory interrelating physical, psychological, intellectual and social changes during the teen years and the systems dealing with those changes. This course meets the Maryland State Department of Education Adolescent Development requirement for an initial certificate in Secondary Education. This course also meets the MSDE Human Growth and Development requirement for an initial certificate in Generic Special Education Ele­mentary/Middle and Generic Special Education Secondary/Adult. Prerequisite: PSYC-101. (3 hours weekly)

PSYC-205 Women and Psychology
3 Credits

This course will examine the history of women in psychology. Additionally, women’s lives and experiences will be explored from a lifespan developmental perspective which includes psychological, social, and biological influences. Students will examine current research on a variety of topics and critically evaluate the literature. Prerequisite: PSYC-101. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as WMST-205.


PUBLIC HEALTH

PUBH-101 Introduction to Public Health
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
Introduction to Public Health is a survey course designed to introduce students to public health topics such as biostatistics, epidemiology, environmental and occupational health, behavioral health, health policy and administration, maternal and child health, and ethics. The course provides methodology for understanding health and health policy matters at a population level and exposes students to various occupations in the field of public health. Course content will include guest lecturers who serve in a public health field and possible site visits to Public Health institutions. (3 hours weekly)

PUBH-110 Health Care Reform: Cost and Efficacy
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will address the timely issue of health care reform, its goal and objectives, and the pros and cons associated with a national health care system. Topics of study and discussion will be: Is health care for all a reality that we can afford? Can everyone be expected to be served? Will everyone be required to accept the same level of care? What are the sacrifices Americans will be asked to make to ensure health care for all? Will quantity of those insured mean diminished quality of health care? (3 hours weekly)

PUBH-210 Epidemiology
3 Credits

Epidemiology introduces students to the principles and methods public health practitioners employ to determine transmission, distribution, occurrence, and detection of communicable and non-communicable diseases and injury within a population. Epidemiology provides evidence-based data which may point to an association between exposure and development of a disease, leading researchers to further investigate a cause-and-effect relationship through laboratory experiments (i.e. tobacco use and lung cancer). Public policy measures (i.e. smoking tobacco ban) and control of diseases (i.e. SARS) benefit from epidemiologic measures by providing population and individual risk estimates. Course content will include guest lecturers who employ epidemiologic principles in their public health work. Case studies of disease outbreaks will be highlighted (i.e. food-borne illness outbreak) to allow students to practice the methods used by epidemiologists. Prerequisite: MATH-138. (3 hours weekly)

PUBH-230 Health and the Disease Process
3 Credits

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of general pathophysiology of disease processes. It is designed for students enrolled in health programs and those interested in pursuing an advanced degree in the medical/allied health fields. Causes, signs and symptoms, incidence, treatment, and patient teaching are presented. Interventions to prevent disease and promote wellness are integrated into clinical situations. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-230.

PUBH-233 Introduction to Environmental Health
3 Credits

This course examines the impact that environmental factors such as air, water, and food have on human health and well-being, and how people influence the quality of their environment. Students will learn about how human evolution and prosperity results in challenges associated with pollution, overpopulation, health economics, environmental policy, and other issues. Environmental health tools, such as epidemiology, toxicology, policy, and regulation will be applied to current issues of concern. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ENST-233.

PUBH-260 Community Advocacy in Public Health
3 Credits

This course provides students the opportunity to work directly with community-based organizations to develop practical and professional skills in the assessment, development, implementation, and evaluation of public health programming. Students will learn and demonstrate skills in community assessment and organization techniques including: stakeholder identification, coalition-building, grass-roots advocacy, and the identification of funding sources. (3 hours weekly)

PUBH-280 Global Health
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is designed to introduce students to: [1] current and emergent issues that affect the health of the global population, [2] indicators and tools used to assess population health, and [3] measures taken to address the burden of disease. The far-reaching goal of this course is to provide resources and information to motivate citizens to take action toward ensuring equitable global health care. (3 hours weekly)


RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGY

RADT-101 Introduction to Procedures
4 Credits

Students will explore introductory aspects related to the science of radiologic technology. This course is an overview of the history of x-ray, career opportunities, medical and legal ethics associated with the practice of radiologic technology, death and dying, patient care management, and basic radiation protection. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENGL-121; MATH-131, -133, -135, -145 or higher; BIOL-101, BIOL-203, and -204. Pre- or corequisite: PHYS-101. (2.5 hours theory, 6 hours on-campus lab weekly)

RADT-111 Radiologic Procedures I
4 Credits

This course continues the study of terminology and techniques required to produce quality radiographs. Included are appropriate patient-care procedures, basic exposures, positioning techniques, principles of equipment use and radiation protection. Prerequisite: RADT-101. Corequisite: RADT-112. (2 hours theory, 8 hours on-campus lab weekly)

RADT-112 Clinical Radiography I
4 Credits

Supervised use of energized equipment in the on-campus laboratory and clinical laboratory centers to produce quality radiographic images of upper and lower extremities, chest and abdomen. Prerequisite: RADT-101. Corequisite: RADT-111. (16 clinical lab hours weekly)

RADT-121 Radiologic Procedures II
3 Credits
This course will continue the study of radiographic procedures in greater depth with the addition of radiographic examinations focusing on the vertebral column, thoracic cage, pelvic girdle, skull and body systems requiring the administration of contrast materials. Prerequisites: RADT-111 and RADT-112. Corequisites: RADT-122 and RADT-123. (2 hours theory, 4 hours college lab weekly)

RADT-122 Clinical Radiography II
4 Credits

Under supervision, students will use energized equipment in the on-campus laboratory and clinical laboratory centers to develop competency in positioning, producing and processing radiographic images to include the vertebral column, thoracic cage, pelvic girdle, skull and body systems requiring administration of contrast materials. Prerequisites: RADT-111 and RADT-112. Corequisites: RADT-121and RADT-123. (16 clinical lab hours weekly)

RADT-123 Imaging Equipment and Modalities
3 Credits

This course introduces X-ray physics, circuitry and various types of radiographic equipment. Concepts of X-ray production, interaction of X-rays with matter, beam characteristics, image intensification and radiographic accessories. A review of image quality and the evaluation of radiographic equipment and accessories is emphasized. Content is designed to establish a knowledge base in radiographic, fluoroscopic, mobile and tomographic equipment and design. The course will also provide a basic knowledge of quality control. Prerequisite: RADT-111 and RADT-112. Pre- or corequisites: RADT-121 and RADT-122. (3 hours weekly)

RADT-212 Clinical Radiography III
6 Credits
Under supervision, students will use energized equipment in the on-campus laboratory and clinical laboratory centers to develop competency in positioning, producing and processing radiographic images and studies to include mammography, myelography, sialography, arthography, and other special procedures. The clinical focus will be on anatomy, special techniques, positioning, equipment, and image evaluation technique and quality assurance. Prerequisites: RADT-121, RADT-122, RADT-123. (24 clinical lab hours weekly)

RADT-231 Radiologic Procedures IV
4 Credits

This course is the study of advanced radiographic procedures with the addition of computed tomography, digital radiography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, interventional radiography and computer applications in radiology. It includes study of pathologic disorders and their respective impact on radiography. Prerequisite: RADT-212. Corequisite: RADT-232. (2 hours theory, 8 hours on-campus lab weekly)

RADT-232 Clinical Radiography IV
6 Credits

Under supervision, students will use energized equipment in the on-campus laboratory and clinical laboratory centers to develop competency in positioning, producing and processing radiographic images and studies to include computed tomography, digital radiography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and other complicated special procedures performed on ventricular, vascular and other body systems. Prerequisite: RADT-212. Corequisite: RADT-231. (24 clinical lab hours weekly)

RADT-251 Radiation Biology and Protection
2 Credits

This course presents principles of cell radiation and the responsibility of the radiographer to protect patients, personnel and the public from the effects of radiation. Content is designed to provide an overview of the principles of the interaction of radiation with living systems. Radiation effects on molecules, cells, tissues and the body as a whole are presented. Factors affecting biological response are presented, including acute and chronic effects of radiation. Additional topics included calculations of permissible radiation dosage and the effect of federal/state laws and regulations on radiation protection. Emphasis will also be placed on preparing students for the national certification examination. Prerequisites: RADT-231 and RADT-232. Corequisite: RADT-252. (2 hours weekly)

RADT-252 Clinical Radiography V
6 Credits

This course is an advanced clinical practicum which will provide supervised experience in a clinical agency; comprehensive application of previously taught skills and concepts in preparation for entry into practice. Prerequisites: RADT-231 and RADT-232. Corequisite: RADT-251. (24 hours clinical weekly)


RETAILING

RETL-103 Retail Merchandising
3 Credits

This class will acquaint students with the current world of retailing, giving a broad overview of retail store operations. It will involve a site visit to a local retailer, learning the use of current standard marketing techniques such as social networking and guerrilla marketing, goods pricing techniques, and reinforcement of the importance of an effective business plan. Also included will be the basic concepts of retailing, such as: historical and future perspectives, physical facility layouts, and team management principles. (3 hours weekly)

RETL-105 Fashion Merchandising
3 Credits

Through this course students will learn some of the fundamentals of fashion theory and consumer demands, with emphasis on how these apply to the merchandising and retailing of fashion goods. Through class projects, students will engage in analyzing merchandising plans, store images, promotions and retail management philosophies. Students will also have the opportunity throughout the course to examine career opportunities in retailing/merchandising. (3 hours weekly)

RETL-201-202 Retail Work Experience I and II
3 or 4 Credits
See COOP-201-202 Cooperative Education Work Experience I and II.


RUSSIAN

RUSS-101 Elementary Russian I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Russian-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Russian language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Russian language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

RUSS-102 Elementary Russian II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information; to compare Russian-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Russian language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Russian language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

RUSS-201 Intermediate Russian I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging, interpreting, and presenting  information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Russian-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Russian language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Russian language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

RUSS-202 Intermediate Russian II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging, interpreting, and presenting  information in complex structures  and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Russian-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Russian language to other relevant  disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Russian language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

RUSS-203 Advanced Intermediate Russian I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this literature-based, intermediate course, students will further develop skills in reading, comprehending, speaking, and writing. Grammatical concepts introduced in elementary and intermediate classes will be re-examined with the intension of expending them for use in conversation as well as in expressing ideas in writing in the form of a short essay. Content of the course will be determined by the literary works such as classical and contemporary short stories, folk tales, and poems by prominent Russian poets. Students will apply their speaking skills in conversations about the above literary works and presentations. (4 hours weekly)

RUSS-210 Russian Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary study of Russian society and culture through the medium of film. The aim of the course is to show the interconnection between artistic expression and the historical, social, and cultural realities within Russia from the 1920s to the present. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-210.


SOCIOLOGY

SOCI-101 Introduction to Sociology
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

Through this introduction to sociology, the student will develop an understanding of the basic concepts of sociology including culture, socialization, social stratification and social change and be able to apply these concepts to social problems and everyday life experiences. Students will be exposed to sociological information and ideas which will help them understand and clarify their own norms, values and attitudes. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SOCI-102 Social Problems
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

The general objective of this course is to give students a broad overview of contemporary problems both in America and around the world. This course will analyze social problems, both internationally and here in the United States using various sociological perspectives. We will use the tools of sociology–its analytical insights, its theoretical frameworks, and its methods to ask questions about what constitutes a social problem, when does a social condition become problematic, who are advocating which strategies for solutions or social change. We will focus on three general classes of social problems: problems of social inequality and conflict, problems arising within specific social institutions (family life, education, crime, and health care), and problems arising from social change (environmental crises, population growth, and social upheaval). In each case, we will study what is known: (1) about the problem and recent trends therein, (2) its causes and consequences, and (3) individual and societal responses to the phenomenon. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SOCI-103 The Sociology of the Family
3 Credits

The Sociology of the Family will introduce the student to the sociological study of the family. In part one of the course, we will examine the American family in historical and cross-cultural perspective, and in the process achieve a clearer understanding of what the family does and how it has changed. Part two will examine the various paths to family formation and the responsibilities and expectations we have as family members. In part three we will shift focus to the larger social forces that shape families and the implications this has for a social policy of the family. Finally we will turn to the stresses the contemporary family endures and the possibilities this holds for the future of the family. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SOCI-111 Introduction to Women’s Studies: Women, Gender and Society
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

An interdisciplinary study of the construction of gender and its intersection with race and class in the United States. Based primarily in the social sciences and social history, this course also draws on the arts, media, and popular culture in examining the impact of gender on society. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as WMST‑111.

SOCI-115 Emerging World Issues
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course is an interdisciplinary/emerging issues class that will introduce the student to selected issues emerging in our changing world. This course, using social science methodologies, will examine the historical, social, political and economic origins and manifestations of the issue under examination through an interdisciplinary exploration of film, art, literature, together with the economic, social, and social, and political infrastructures that drive the emerging global issue under study. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SOCI-130 Human Sexuality
3 Credits

Through this introduction to the field of human sexuality, the student will be able to recall and describe historical and current research knowledge related to physiological, psychological, anthropological, and soci­ological aspects of human sexuality across the life span. Students will discuss and evaluate their own beliefs and values relevant to the topics of various types of sexual behavior, sexual problems and their treatments. In addition, the student will be able to describe important legal and ethical sexual issues. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-130.

SOCI-160 The Aging Process: Gerontology
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will focus on the physiological, psychological and social changes that impact upon the aging population. In addition the student will focus on assessment and counseling skills relevant to preserving independence in the aged, and meeting the health needs of the aging population. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as AGNG-160.

SOCI-201 Minorities in American Society
3 Credits

Minorities in American Society will introduce students to a sociological investigation of the racial, ethnic and gender stratification system found in the United States. This course will introduce the student to concepts ­essential to the sociological analysis of the American strat­ification system such as prejudice, discrimination, minority, race, ethnicity and gender. This course will ex­amine the historical process through which the American racial and ethnic stratification system was socially constructed, and it will examine the various theoretical perspectives that have emerged in the attempt to understand this historical process. It will also teach the student to apply these concepts and theories to an analysis of contemporary social problems and to his or her every­day life experiences. The student will be exposed to sociological information and ideas that will help him or her to understand and to critically analyze the world we live in. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SOCI-202 Urban Sociology
3 Credits

Urban Sociology is a lecture and discussion course in which the student will analyze the social relationships of man in his urban environment. The student will examine the way in which spacial and physical dimensions of urban areas have been shaped; describe the various life styles of urbanized man; analyze the growth, development and planning of suburbs and new towns; and examine a number of social problems facing urban America including effective government, zoning and land use, housing, education, urban planning and crime. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SOCI-203 Sociology of Sport
3 Credits

Through this course, the student will analyze contemporary sport using theoretical tools and research methods of sociology. The student will investigate the ways in which sport is shaped by social forces such as culture, economics, politics, stratification, globalization and consumerism. The student will also study the effects of sport on the larger society by examining sport’s societal functions, its influence on social interaction, and its relation to various social problems including deviance and inequality. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SOCI-204 Social Change
3 Credits (Social and Behavioral Sciences Core)

This course is an opportunity for students to continue developing their sociological imagination as it relates to social change in society, both domestically and internationally. We will consider the social origins, purposes, and consequences of social change in contemporary societies, and will emphasize the ways in which change agents, trends, and social contexts, reproduce, reinforce, and challenge prevailing institutional relationships. This course will critically explore the evolution of social change by investigating topics that are both theoretical and practical in nature. The goal of this course is to expand an understanding of the dynamic relationships between the impetus for social change and the consequences of change as reflected in the communities in which we live and the global arena. Pre-requisite: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SOCI-225 Sociology of Conflict and Non-Violence
3 Credits

This course examines why humans engage in conflict, why violence is employed to resolve conflict and the nature and practice of non-violent conflict resolution. Students will explore the social forces that produce conflict–including cultural, economic, and psychological–and the arenas in which conflict occurs–including family, community, nation and world. Within an interdisciplinary framework (using social sciences and humanities), students will learn the theoretical, historical, practical, and political aspects of violent and non-violent conflict. Special attention will be given to emerging social and global conflicts, including examination of how or if these conflicts might be resolved in a non-violent manner. Prerequisite: SOCI-101 or SOCI-102. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as CRES-225.


SPANISH

SPAN-101 Elementary Spanish I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Spanish-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Spanish language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Spanish language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

SPAN-102 Elementary Spanish II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Spanish-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Spanish language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Spanish language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

SPAN-201 Intermediate Spanish I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Spanish-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Spanish language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Spanish language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

SPAN-202 Intermediate Spanish II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging, interpreting, and presenting  information in complex structures and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Spanish-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Spanish language to other relevant disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Spanish language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

SPAN-203 Advanced Intermediate Spanish I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this content-based, intermediate course, students will further develop skills in comprehending and speaking Spanish. Grammatical concepts introduced in elementary and intermediate classes will be re-examined with the intention of expanding them for use in conversation. Content will be based on traditional themes, such as interpersonal relationships or the environment, on topics of current interest, such as the effect of globalization or technology on society and on cultural issues. Students will apply their speaking skills in conversations, debates, short presentations and interviews. (4 hours weekly)

SPAN-204 Advanced Intermediate Spanish II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this content-based course, students will further develop skills in writing and reading. Grammatical concepts introduced in elementary and intermediate classes will be reexamined with the intention of expanding them for use in both reading and writing. Content will be based on the themes of religion and politics, family and family roles and on changing values. Students will work with short stories and film as a basis for skill development. (4 hours weekly)

SPAN-205 Spanish Through the Media
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this content-based, advanced intermediate course, students will further develop skills in comprehending and speaking Spanish. Learning will be based on current authentic Spanish media, including news from satellite channels, broadcast news, printed Spanish newspapers, computer-based materials, public lectures and current events. Grammatical concepts introduced in elementary and intermediate classes will be re-examined with the intention of expanding them for use in conversation. Students will apply their speaking skills in activities such as summarizing, rephrasing, transcribing and presenting. The fundamental goal of this course is to build fluency in all skills while developing an extensive vocabulary through media exposure. (4 hours weekly)

SPAN-221 Cultures of the Spanish-Speaking World
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

In this course, students will study the geography and history of the countries where Spanish is the main language as they apply to the development of various cultures, attitudes, and beliefs. They will compare and contrast various institutions, both governmental and social, with special emphasis on a specific country or region, such as Spain, South America, the Caribbean, and/or Mexico. Students will also look at the expression of culture through art, music, food, dress, and literature. Taught in English, this course does not fulfill the world languages sequence requirement. (3 hours weekly)
SPEECH

SPCH-105 Fundamentals of Public Speaking
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

Students will gain skill in public speaking and overcome visible nervousness when speaking in front of an audience. Students will learn how to structure informative and persuasive messages for the maximum effect and will experience using audio-visual aids effectively. Students will practice critical listening in learning to evaluate the content, delivery and style of speeches. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SPCH-110  Interpersonal Communication
3 Credits (Humanities Core)

Students will learn basic theories of oral communication, studying the types of verbal exchanges each of us has every day. The course begins with an overview of the human use of communication, including perception (with em­phasis on inter-gender and intercultural communication), listening, verbal and non-verbal language, and sending and receiving feedback. Students will practice communication skills in pairs and write extensively about their experiences. When a student’s curriculum requires HMDV-100, it should be completed before this course is taken. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SPCH-115 Intercultural Communication
3 Credits

Using directed readings, stories, media and activities, this course is designed to increase students’ sensitivity to other cultures, and just as importantly, increase awareness of their own cultural backgrounds and the contexts (social, cultural and historical) in which we live and communicate. This course is designed for students to explore communication differences and similarities when living and working with people of different ethnicity, race, sex and/or nationality. Through increased awareness and sensitivity, students will be able to articulate intercultural influences on communication. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

SPCH-142 Business Development and Sales for Emerging Leaders
3 Credits

Developing effective selling skills is important not only for professional salespeople but also for all of us who seek to persuade others. This course introduces the student to the basic skills used in business development and professional selling. Topics covered include how to prospect for potential clients, build effective relationships, assess an individual’s needs, present specific solutions and negotiate agreements. Given the growing need for global competency among business professionals, this course will also look at cultural context and the implications for negotiating agreements. This is appropriate for those interested in learning more about the profession of selling or for those who want to improve their ability to persuade others. Instruction is highly interactive with extensive use of oral and written communication and role play. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as BMGT-142.

SPCH-145 The Standard American Accent
3 Credits

This course is designed to help students reduce their regional or non-standard American English accent. This course also allows students to experience and understand the basic tools of communication, voice, and diction. Class exercises include relaxation, articulation, vocal range, and inflection. Students will learn to speak the standard American English accent with clarity and confidence. (3 hours weekly)

SPCH-151 The Spoken Word
3 Credits

The course will focus on performing literary selections as spoken presentations with an emphasis on analyzing prose, poetry, dramatic literature, and children’s literature in order to communicate its beauty, meaning, and emotional impact while emphasizing the oral and aural quality of the works. In addition, this course will empower individuals to feel more at ease making text-based presentations at public and private events. Especially recommended for all public performers, education, business and journalism /mass media majors and for those wishing to improve their delivery and articulation. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-151.

SPCH-160 Argumentation and Debate
3 Credits

The course includes skill training in reasoning and researching as well as presenting and defending positions effectively. Recommended for students seeking careers in law, business, teaching, or politics. Students will be taught the appropriateness and ethics of good argumentation. They will learn how to build arguments using effective evidence and reasoning while learning to recognize the fallacies of weak arguments. Argumentation skills will be applied for effective delivery in academic, legislative, judicial, and/or political debates. Students will enhance their skills by being videotaped and being required to review those tapes and turn‑in a self-evaluation. Prerequisite: SPCH-105. (3 hours weekly)

SPCH-175 Business Communications
3 Credits

Communication skills are vital to the success of any employable person in today’s competitive organizational environment. Those able to communicate an idea through interpersonal communication, technology, and writing will be better prepared to conduct themselves properly in an organizational setting. This course encompasses four primary facets of business communication applicable to any employment setting: business writing, interpersonal business communication, business etiquette and professionalism, and business communications utilizing technology. Students will be immersed in the business writing process, thus enabling them to plan, design, and ultimately author a number of documents applicable to today’s organizational environment. Students will compose cover letters, resumes, thank you letters, and job acceptance letters in preparation for the job search process. Students will also learn how to function cohesively and communicate as a team through delivering a persuasive group presentation. Finally, course members will learn how companies leverage technology, such as web applications, social media, and other tools to better communicate internally as well as with customers. By the completion of this course, students will also maintain a firm understanding of the nuances of business etiquette, both domestically and internationally. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as BMGT-175.

SPCH-205 Intermediate Public Speaking
3 Credits

Students will gain development of a marked degree of skill in the composition and delivery of various types of speeches. Students will obtain advanced training in speech delivery techniques in both a controlled classroom audience setting as well as presentations in corporate board rooms, orientation meetings, banquet halls, and public forums using complex and multi-media visual aids. Special emphasis on speeches related to the student’s major vocational area. Prerequisite: SPCH-105. (3 hours weekly)

SPCH-260 Voice and Diction
3 Credits

This course allows students to experience and understand the basic tools of communication, voice, and diction. Class exercises include relaxation, alignment, breathing, phonation, resonation, articulation, vocal range, and inflection. Students will develop a knowledge and sense of their own voice and speech expressing who they are and what they feel. Students will demonstrate mastery of the International Phonetic Alphabet through testing and several memorized performances. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as THET-260.


TELECOMMUNICATIONS

TELE-100 Introduction to Telecommunications
3 Credits

This course is designed to introduce to the student the theory, principles and applications of telecommunications technology. Students will receive an introduction to telecommunications regulations, communication methodology, communication theory, transmission techniques, coding schemes and transmission media. This course includes software simulation, demo instructions of communication hardware, and applications which will enhance the understanding of communication concepts. (3 hours weekly)

TELE-200 Quality Control
3 Credits

This course is designed for the student in the Photonics Technology program. The course introduces the student to (a) the principles, philosophies, and practices of Total Quality Management (TQM) and (b) the techniques of Statistical Quality Control, including fundamentals of probability and statistics, control charts for variables and attributes, and acceptance sampling. Prerequisite: MATH-070. (3 hours weekly)


TELEVISION AND RADIO

TVRD-125 Concept and Story Development
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to concept development and storytelling methods through a series of short writing assignments of various forms. Students will generate ideas and stories for creative projects in print and electronic media such as television, radio, and film. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ENGL-125.

TVRD-126 Introduction to Journalism
3 Credits

This course will provide a framework for the practical applications required to operate as a journalist in the twenty-first century. Students will discuss the role and responsibility of press in a free society and will benefit from the opportunity to evaluate popular journalistic mediums and their respective contents while applying their conclusions to their own decisions and styles as future journalists. They will take on the role of journalist as they adhere to the professional standards of news, feature, and opinion pieces for a magazine or newspaper. Finally, students will implement the writing process, from research, interviewing, and note taking through editing, proofreading, and potential publication. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ENGL-126.

TVRD-129 Mass Media
3 Credits

The major forms of mass media are studied both historically and in their present forms. Emphasis is on the effects of radio, television, and film in our society. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

TVRD-130 Introduction to Video I
3 Credits

This course will include the basic skills of video: direction, camera techniques, lighting and sound techniques, and editing techniques. The emphasis will be on producing short video segments using television field production techniques and design principles. (4 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ARTT-130.

TVRD-131 Introduction to Video II
3 Credits

This course will include the intermediate skills of video: producing, directing, camera techniques, lighting and sound techniques, and editing techniques. The emphasis will be on producing television shows using field and studio production techniques and design principles. Prerequisite: TVRD-130 or ARTT-130. (4 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ARTT-131.

TVRD-139 Principles of Film and Media Production
3 Credits

This course is an interdisciplinary study of film and media production. Emphasis is on the overview of the various types of media production a film/video student could pursue in the commercial, corporate, or artistic world. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-139.

TVRD-150 Introduction to Radio I
3 Credits

This course is an introduction to the radio industry standards and production. Students will learn the basic workings of a radio station, programming, writing, recording, editing and announcing skills. Students will also learn about the different types of radio stations, the evolution of radio, and challenges of the future. (4 hours weekly)

TVRD-151 Introduction to Radio II
3 Credits

This course is an in-depth study of radio programming for news. Students will design, develop and produce a news format radio show. The emphasis will be on news gathering, story line up, writing and announcing the news. Students will work as a team throughout the semester. Prerequisite: TVRD-150. (4 hours weekly)

TVRD-220 Introduction to Broadcasting
3 Credits

This course is a survey and introduction that concentrates on the historical development, scope, and influence of radio and television in America. Discussion in the course will focus on the philosophy, structure, organization and operation of the broadcasting medium, and will acquaint students with the interrelationships of the industry to the audience, advertisers, and government regulators. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

TVRD-223 Writing for Screen Narrative
3 Credits
This course will teach the strategies and means to develop and execute narrative scripts with the primary focus on the short form narrative film. Emphasis is placed on the student’s increasing ability to employ the tools of the craft, including but not limited to: story structure, mythic structure, plot, characterization, dialogue, format, story editing and revision. Conventional scriptwriting techniques will be covered as well as critical approaches to understanding these techniques. Elements of the feature film form will be studied, extrapolated and applied to shorter forms as well. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ENGL-223 and FILM-223.

TVRD-224 Writing for Radio and Multimedia
3 Credits

This course is an overview and introduction to writing for ear and writing for multimedia productions as they relate specifically to radio. Students will write and voice original scripts using studio recording equipment, editing software, and multimedia software tools. Emphasis is on analysis of peer scripts as well as the scripts of professional productions, and on revision. Students create several projects with focus on audience demographics, research, script writing format, storyboarding and completing a multimedia production. Topics include news writing, interviewing, promos, PSAs, commercials, pitches, personal essays, blogging and audio slideshows. Prerequisite: ENGL -121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ENGL-224.

TVRD-225 Cinematography and Lighting for Film and Television
3 Credits
This course will develop complex skills in both the theory and practice of cinematography and lighting. Advanced camera functions will be explored from a technical and creative perspective, and students will develop visual solutions for a variety of shooting situations. Lighting techniques will be examined using studio lights, grip equipment, and additive gels. Emphasis will be placed on working collaboratively in a professional studio environment to create lighting designs for both film and television. Prerequisite: ARTT-130 or TVRD-130. (4 hours weekly)

TVRD-230 Television Production I
3 Credits

This course will include the basic structure of dramatic television productions: script breakdown, casting, directing talent, as well as camera, sound, and lighting techniques for dramatic productions. Television majors will be working with students from THET-241, Acting for Television. Prerequisite: ARTT-131 or TVRD-131. (4 hours weekly)

TVRD-231 Television Production II
3 Credits
This course will include complex skills in dramatic television productions: script breakdown, casting, directing talent, as well as camera, sound, and lighting techniques for dramatic productions. Television majors will be working with students from THET-241, Acting for Television, and assembling production crews to complete short dramatic scenes. Prerequisites: TVRD-230 and TVRD-223 or ENGL-223. (4 hours weekly)

TVRD-250 Radio Production I
3 Credits
This course builds on the skills learned in Introduction to Radio I and II through hands-on radio production and programming. Students will work as a team in a real internet radio lab and will be able to produce and air a quality music-based radio show. Prerequisite: TVRD-151. (4 hours weekly)

TVRD-251 Radio Production II
3 Credits

This advanced course concentrates on information-based talk radio. Students will produce an NPR style feature, produce and publish a podcast, and conduct a one-hour talk show in the college radio lab. Students will work on interviewing skills and learn about different types of talk formats. The importance of research and show preparation will be discussed. Prerequisites: TVRD-250 and TVRD-224 or ENGL-224. (4 hours weekly)

TVRD-290 Television and Radio Internship I
3 Credits
This internship combines classroom theory and work applications with on-the-job training. Students will learn how to make the transition from school to work. The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives designed to broaden the educational experience.

TVRD-291 Television and Radio Internship II
3 Credits

This course is the second of two internship courses which combines classroom theory and work applications with on-the-job training. Students will continue to learn how to make the transition from school to work. The internship is a practicum with measurable learning objectives designed to broaden the educational experience. Prerequisite: TVRD-290.


THEATRE

THET-101 Introduction to Acting
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

An introduction to the actor’s art through exercises, improvisations and scripted work designed to boost self confidence in oral and physical communication skills as well as foster imaginative responses to the creative theatre process. (3 hours weekly)

THET-102 Acting I
3 Credits (Fine Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is an introduction to the art and craft of acting, focusing on the actor’s inner and outer resources including physical and vocal response, concentration, imagination, and sensory awareness. Also includes beginning-level work on character creation through improvisation, performance and script analysis. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

THET-120 Stage Management
3 Credits

Students will learn and practice the basic principles of organizing a rehearsal process, managing appropriate procedures and regulations, and running the performances of a theatrical production. (3 hours weekly)

THET-125 Text Analysis
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

Students will develop the skills necessary for the analysis and interpretation of play scripts from a variety of global cultures as the basis for public performance, from the viewpoints of audience members and practitioners. Students will be introduced to various play types and structures as distinct from one another and requiring different types of analysis and appreciation. Introduction to research methods for contemporary performance, including reviews, critical interpretation, and research for production. Required for all theatre majors. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

THET-131 Theatre Appreciation
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course is designed to help students not majoring in theatre develop an appreciation of the art form by understanding the relationship of theatre to society and diverse cultures. Students become familiar with components of stage art including play-writing, acting, directing, and design through practical experiences and viewing of live productions and films. Students will be prepared for greater enjoyment of theatre by developing a more critical eye for the many facets of the art form. (3 hours weekly)

THET-135 Stagecraft
3 Credits

This course will allow the student to gain knowledge in the main disciplines of theatre, including scenery, lighting and projection, costume and makeup, sound, stage management and properties. Safe operation of power tools and back stage machinery, lighting equipment, audio equipment are also covered. (4 hours weekly)

THET-136 Lighting I
3 Credits

The purpose of this class is to enable students to safely work with basic stage lighting and projection equipment for the stage and provide a basic understanding of lighting technology along with new innovations in lighting and projection technology. This will include working with electrical wiring, hand and power tools, stage lights, computerized lighting consoles, projectors and media servers. Prerequisite: THET-135. (4 hours weekly)

THET-137 Sound I
3 Credits

The purpose of this class is to enable students to safely work with basic sound equipment for the stage and provide a basic understanding of audio technology along with new innovations in audio technology. This will include working with microphones, amplifiers, mixers, tape decks and equalizers. Prerequisite: THET-135. (4 hours weekly)

THET-138 Basic Stage/Media Make-Up
3 Credits
Basic Stage/Media Make-Up is a hands-on course that will address the following topics: basic understanding of facial anatomy and its application to make-up; basic theory on the origin and need for make-up; character analysis through make-up; principles of highlight, shadow, color, and lighting; types and styles of make-up; application and design; and the purpose of the make-up designer/artist. (3 hours weekly)

THET-151 The Spoken Word
3 Credits

The course will focus on performing literary selections as spoken presentations with an emphasis on analyzing prose, poetry, dramatic literature, and children’s literature in order to communicate its beauty, meaning, and emotional impact while emphasizing the oral and aural quality of the works. In addition, this course will empower individuals to feel more at ease making text-based presentations at public and private events. Especially recommended for all public performers, education, business and journalism majors and for those wishing to improve their delivery and articulation. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as SPCH-151.

THET-160, 161, 162, 163 Theatre Practicum
1 Credit

Students will practice their knowledge and skills in designated areas of theatre production. Hands-on experience with different phases of production is the method of instruction. Students will concentrate their efforts in one of the following areas - lighting, sound, set construction, costuming, theatre management, stage management, directing, props, or acting. Acting is by audition only. The student may take theatre practicum four times for credit. Each registration should be for the next numbered course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor required. (2-3 hours weekly)

THET-177 Introduction to Stage Combat
2 Credits

This course will introduce students to the basics of safety and partnering techniques in unarmed, knife, broadsword, quarterstaff, and single sword combat for the stage. Students must work diligently to create a safe environment while portraying a character in a fight performance. Students will demonstrate these partnering skills in class performances. This class will also give an overview on stage combat styles around the world. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-177.

THET-190 Theatre History I
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)
A study of the evolution of theatre from its ritual origins through Greek and Roman traditions, the medieval worlds of England and Japan, the Renaissance through Romanticism, examining Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, Restoration and Neo-Classical traditions, as well as the 17th and 18th century Italian, German, French, Spanish, and early American Theatre. Emphasis is on the play in performance reflecting the changing physical theatre, as well as the social, political, and artistic currents of each period. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

THET-191  Theatre History II
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

A study of the evolution of theatre from the development of Realism in the 19th century through the Theatre of the Absurd in the 1960’s examining Naturalism, Idealism, Symbolism, Expressionism, and Surrealism, continuing to the highly diversified contemporary theatre from the 1960’s to the present, with special attention to issues of diversity, access, the international avant-garde, and the impact of technology. Emphasis is on the play in performance reflecting the changing physical theatre, as well as the social, political, and artistic currents of the period. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

THET-202 Acting II
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

This course expands on the critical thinking and artistic skills initiated in Acting I, creating a dialogue between theory and practice through deeper character work and detailed script analysis combined with a disciplined approach to the rehearsal process. Prerequisite: THET-102. (3 hours weekly)

THET-209 Modern Drama
3 Credits (Literature/Arts/Humanities Core)

Modern Drama studies work written for European and American theater in the last and present century. Students discuss and appraise plays; identify basic elements which distinguish modern drama from earlier periods; evaluate performances of contemporary plays; and study what playwrights have said about the nature of drama. Students also discuss the impact of major philosophical and scientific achievements on dramatic material. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ENGL-209.

THET-216 Contemporary Drama: Topics in Diversity
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities/Literature Core)

Contemporary Drama studies works written for European and American theater from 1950 until current practice. Students discuss and appraise plays; identify basic elements which distinguish contemporary drama from earlier periods; evaluate performances of contemporary plays; and study what playwrights have said about the nature of drama. Students are introduced to the formalist conventions and characteristics, terms and concepts, and critical theory of drama in order to master skills in interpretation, analysis, and critical evaluation. Students also discuss the impact of gender, race, culture, and sexual orientation studies on dramatic material. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. NOTE: Also listed as ENGL-216.

THET-224 Musical Theatre Performance
2 Credits

This course serves as an overview of all the necessary skills needed in musical theatre performance. Topics include singing techniques, music reading and sight singing, choosing and performing audition material, working with musical directors and accompanists, acting the song, the business of musical theatre, and Broadway history from 1927 to present. Students will attend at least two professional musical theatre performances. The class will culminate in a public performance of class material. Pre- or corequisite: MUSC-117 or MUSC-118. (3 hours weekly)

THET-241 Acting for Television
3 Credits

This class will prepare students to present themselves in a professional manner in any of the mass media. Voice, appearance, movement and the technical aspects of the mass media performance will be covered through comprehensive exercises and on-camera evaluation. Prerequisite: THET-102. (4 hours weekly)

THET-260 Voice and Diction
3 Credits

This course allows students to experience and understand the basic tools of communication, voice, and diction. Class exercises include relaxation, alignment, breathing, phonation, resonation, articulation, vocal range, and inflection. Students will develop a knowledge and sense of their own voice and speech expressing who they are and what they feel. Students will demonstrate mastery of the International Phonetic Alphabet through testing and several memorized performances. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as SPCH-260.

THET-261 Dialects for the Actor
3 Credits

This course will explore how to improve the voice through warm-ups and phonetic articulation. The students will use this knowledge to aid them in learning seven different dialects: standard British, Cockney, Irish, variations of American Southern, French, German, and Russian. Students will demonstrate how to research a dialect, mark a text, and speak the dialect using the sounds that are character relevant. Students will perform a monologue or scene for each dialect learned. Prerequisite: THET-260 or SPCH-260. (3 hours weekly)

THET-265 Acting Shakespeare
3 Credits

This course will introduce students to the acting techniques employed to perform the works of William Shakespeare. Topics will include scansion, voice and diction, period movement, historical overview, and stage to screen performances. Students will demonstrate their performance skills through memorized monologues and scenes. Students will participate in a public performance event at HCC, performing Shakespeare pieces learned in class. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly)

THET-271 Theatre Juried Audition Techniques
2 Credits

This course is a capstone course for the theatre performance track in the theatre area of study intended to prepare a résumé and audition monologues for both professional work and application to transfer institutions. The culmination of the course will be the presentation of monologues and résumé to a jury comprised of departmental instructors and theatre professionals. Students will be expected to put significant time into their preparation outside of class meetings. Prerequisite: THET-202. (2 hours weekly)

THET-273 Movement for the Actor
3 Credits

This course will focus on training actors to understand their own physical habits through spatial awareness exercises, Laban, Element, Lecoq, and Alexander terminology. The students will demonstrate these skills by studying the physical habits of other students in the class. The students will then apply this knowledge towards developing physical embodiments of characters in monologues and scenes. Students will also demonstrate their skills in Neutral and Character Mask work. Prerequisite: THET-102. (4 hours weekly)

THET-277 Intermediate Stage Combat: Unarmed
2 Credits
This physically-intense course will reinforce safety and partnering techniques in unarmed combat for the stage. Students must work diligently to create a safe environment while portraying a character in a fight performance. Students will demonstrate these advanced partnering skills in class performances. Students will have the option of performing a Skills Proficiency Test in Unarmed for a Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors (SAFD). If students pass, they receive a certificate of proficiency in Unarmed from the SAFD. Prerequisite: THET-177 or LFIT-177. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-277.

THET-278 Intermediate Stage Combat: Single Sword
2 Credits

This physically-intense course will reinforce the safety and partnering techniques in flashy, Hollywood sword fighting for the stage. Students must work diligently to create a safe environment while portraying a character in a fight performance. Students will demonstrate these advanced partnering skills in class performances. Students will have the option of performing a Skills Proficiency Test in Single Sword for a Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors (SAFD). If students pass, they receive a certificate of proficiency in Single Sword from the SAFD. Prerequisite: THET-177 or LFIT-177. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-278.

THET-279 Intermediate Stage Combat: Quarterstaff
2 Credits

This physically-intense course is intended for students who seek advanced actor training in quarterstaff combat for the stage. Students must demonstrate safe partnering techniques and strong acting choices while fighting with quarterstaffs onstage. Topics covered include acting the fight, scene selections from film and literature, quarterstaff techniques, critiquing choreography, and voice in violence. Students will have the option of performing a Skills Proficiency Test in Quarterstaff for a Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors (SAFD). If students pass the Skills Proficiency Test, they receive a certificate of proficiency in Quarterstaff from the SAFD. Prerequisite: THET-177 or LFIT-177. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-279.

THET-280 Intermediate Stage Combat: Knife
2 Credits

This physically-intense course is intended for students who seek advanced actor training in knife combat for the stage. Students must demonstrate safe partnering techniques and strong acting choices while fighting with aluminum theatrical knives. Topics covered include acting the fight, scene selections from film and literature, knife techniques, critiquing choreography, and voice in violence. Students will have the option of performing a Skills Proficiency Test in Knife for a Fight Master with the Society of American Fight Directors (SAFD). If students pass the Skills Proficiency Test, they receive a certificate of proficiency in Knife from the SAFD. Prerequisite: THET-177 or LFIT-177. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as LFIT-280.


TURKISH

TURK-101 Elementary Turkish I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this foundational course, students will apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to be able to communicate at a basic level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting information; to compare Turkish-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect the Turkish language to other relevant disciplines; and to begin using the Turkish language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

TURK-102 Elementary Turkish II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second-semester foundational course, students will advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to expand their ability to communicate at a basic level by  exchanging,  interpreting, and presenting  information; to compare Turkish-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Turkish language to other relevant disciplines; and to expand their use of the Turkish language outside of the classroom in limited contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary that support it will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

TURK-201 Intermediate Turkish I
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this first intermediate-level course, students will further advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to refine their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by exchanging, interpreting, and presenting  information in multiple tenses and contexts; to deepen the comparisons of Turkish-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Turkish language to other relevant  disciplines; and to expand their use of the Turkish language outside of the classroom in a variety of contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)

TURK-202 Intermediate Turkish II
4 Credits (Humanities Core)

In this second intermediate-level course, students will greatly advance their ability to apply four language skills – listening, speaking, writing, and reading – in order to further refine and expand their ability to communicate at a intermediate level by  exchanging, interpreting, and presenting  information in complex structures  and contexts; to deepen further the comparisons of Turkish-speaking cultures’ practices, perspectives, and products to students’ own cultures; to connect  the Turkish language to other relevant  disciplines and current topics; and to expand their use of the Turkish language outside of the classroom in a variety of complex contexts. Content and supporting language structures and vocabulary will be theme-based, with outcomes measured in a variety of ways, including task-based activities that support effective communication around the theme. (4 hours weekly)


WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS

WCOM-110 RF/Wireless Fundamentals
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, the student will understand the fundamentals of Radio Frequency and Wireless technologies in the real world environment and how information is transmitted and received through that medium. An overview of many types of cellular communication systems will also be presented. Prerequisite: TELE-100. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

WCOM-120 Wireless Communications
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, the student will understand the fundamentals of electromagnetic wave propagation in the real world environment and how information is transmitted and received through that medium. An overview of many types of wireless communication systems will be presented. The numerous problems in selecting the method of transmission and reception will be considered, and the impact of noise, power, and impedance on system performance will be addressed. Specific circuits unique to this branch of electronics will be examined. Pre‑ or corequisites: ELEC-213 and WCOM-110. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

WCOM-200 Wireless LANs
3 Credits

Upon completion of this course, the student will apply the principles of wireless data communications, protocols, and standards related to Wireless Local Area Networking (WLAN). Topics include: RF Transmission, propagation, WLAN frequency bands, characteristics and uses of wireless network devices, compare and contrast with standard “wired” network device and WLAN implementations. Students will have hands-on experience in building, configuring, securing and troubleshooting basic and extended WLANs. Students will be qualified to administer and support different brands of wireless LAN hardware. This course prepares students to sit for Certified Wireless Network Administrator (CWNA) certification. Prerequisite: CSCO-281. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab weekly)

WCOM-220 Advanced Topics in Wireless Communications
3 Credits

As the field of wireless industry rapidly evolves, new technologies will be introduced to keep the students abreast of the state of the art in the wireless communications industry. Students will be introduced to advanced topics, as per their area of interest, radio frequency, 3G implementation, WLAN implementation, new features and implementation of wireless security. Guest speakers will be invited to present and supplement the classroom seminars. Each student will be required to pursue individual area of interest culminating in a mentored applications-oriented wireless communications project and presentation to the class. Emphasis is placed on selecting, planning, implementing, testing and presenting the project. Prerequisite: WCOM-120 and WCOM‑200. (3 hours weekly)


WOMEN'S STUDIES

WMST-111 Introduction to Women’s Studies: Women, Gender and Society
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

An interdisciplinary study of the construction of gender and its intersection with race and class in the United States. Based primarily in the social sciences and social history, this course also draws on the arts, media, and popular culture in examining the impact of gender on society. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as SOCI-111.

WMST-150 Women’s Health
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course will introduce students to a variety of women’s health issues as well as the barriers faced by women striving to achieve a healthful lifestyle. Students will examine topics including: female sexual health and reproduction, exercise and eating behaviors, substance abuse, mental health and stress, and violence against women. This course is designed to support students in their personal exploration of attitudes, knowledge and values related to women’s health and to assist them as they analyze their personal health behaviors. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HEED-150.

WMST-193 Introduction to Women’s Studies: Women, Art, and Culture
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

An introduction to the ideas and issues central to Women’s Studies and feminism with emphasis on women’s art and culture. The course will examine how women have been represented and how gender has been constructed in the dominant culture as well as the role of the arts and of women themselves in developing an alternative women’s culture. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FINE-193.

WMST-205 Women and Psychology
3 Credits

This course will examine the history of women in psychology. Additionally, women’s lives and experiences will be explored from a lifespan developmental perspective which includes psychological, social, and biological influences. Students will examine current research on a variety of topics and critically evaluate the literature. Prerequisite: PSYC-101. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as PSYC-205.

WMST-212 By and About Women
3 Credits (Literature/Humanities Core)

By and About Women studies literature written by female authors and/or about female characters. Students critically evaluate a variety of texts for form and technique. In addition, students analyze the validity of the female experience as portrayed in literature and are expected to gain insight into the challenges and power of women in literature and in life. This course is writing intensive. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as ENGL-212.

WMST-225 Women in American History: Colonial Times to 1880
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

An in-depth study of the lives and experiences of American women from the early seventeenth century to 1880. This course examines three major cultures native, African and European as they met and mixed in colonial America with particular attention to women’s experience in this cultural mixing. Focus will be on wealthy merchant families, slave holding planter families, indentured servants, slaves, factory workers, and immigrants and will include women’s relationships with husbands, children and other women. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HIST-225.

WMST-227 Women in American History: 1880 to the Present
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)
An in-depth study of the lives and experiences of American women from diverse racial and ethnic groups from 1880 to the present. This course examines the experiences of women in the modern world from the end of the nineteenth century through the twentieth. Focus will be on the varying experiences of reformers, workers, organizers, and immigrants with particular attention to differences between married and single women and between those living in the cities and those living in rural areas. During this time period, women have gained the legal right to vote and run for office, regulate the size of their families, and receive equal pay for equal work. And yet women retain primary responsibility for housekeeping and child care. This course considers the roots of some of these contradictions. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HIST-227.

WMST-228 Women in European History: 1750 to the Present
3 Credits (Interdisciplinary and Emerging Issues Core)

This course analyzes women’s changing ­economic, family, and political roles from the ­eighteenth to the twentieth century. Topics ­include the effects of industrialization on women’s work and status, the demographic revolution, and women’s political activities in market ­riots, revolutions, and campaigns for women’s rights. Prerequisite: ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as HIST-228.

WMST-270 Women and Film
3 Credits (Arts/Humanities Core)

An interdisciplinary study of women in film, this course will review a wide variety of movies written and/or directed by women, featuring women, and dealing with women’s issues. This course draws on the arts, media, and popular culture in examining the impact of gender expectations on shaping societal roles. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL-121. (3 hours weekly) NOTE: Also listed as FILM-270.


hcc catalogue '11-'12


Accounting - ACCT
Aging Services - AGNG
American Sign Language - AMSL
Anthropology - ANTH
Arabic - ARAB 
Art - ARTT 
Astronomy - ASTR
Bioinformatics - BFMT 
Biology - BIOL 
Biomedical Engineering - BMET
Business - BMGT 
Cardiovascular Technology - CARD
Chemistry - CHEM 
Chinese - CHNS 
Cisco - CSCO 
Computer-Aided Design - CADD
Computer Forensics - CFOR 
Computer Systems - CMSY 
Conflict Resolution - CRES
Construction Management - CNST 
Cooperative Education - COOP
Criminal Justice - CRIM 
Culinary Management - CMGT 
Dance - DANC
Dental Hygiene - DHYG 
Diagnostic Medical
Sonography - DMSU

Economics - ECON 
Education - EDUC 
Electronics - ELEC 
Emergency Medical Technician/
Paramedic - EMSP
 
Engineering -ENES 
English- ENGL 
Entrepreneurship - ENTR 
Environmental Science - ENST
Exercise Science - EXSC 
Farsi - FARS
Film - FILM 
Financial Planning- FNPL 
Fine Arts - FINE 
First-Year Experience - FYEX
French - FREN 
Geography - GEOG
Geology - GEOL

German - GERM 
Greek - GREK 
Health Care - HEAL 
Health Education - HEED 
Hebrew - HBRW
Hindi - HNDI
History - HIST 
Horticulture - HORT 
Hospitality Management - HMGT
Human Development - HMDV 
Human Services - HUMS 
Humanities - HUMN
Interior Design - INDS
Italian - ITAL 
Japanese - JPNS
Korean - KORE 
Life Fitness - LFIT 
Mathematics - MATH 
Medical Laboratory
Technician - MLTS

Meteorology - METO 
Microsoft - MSFT 
Music - MUSC 
Nursing - NURS 
Nutrition - NUTR
Office Technology - OFFI 
Philosophy - PHIL 
Physical Therapist
Assistant - PTAP
 
Physics - PHYS 
Political Science - POLI 
Portuguese - PORT
Psychology - PSYC 
Public Health - PUBH
Radiologic Technology - RADT
Retailing - RETL 
Russian - RUSS 
Social Work - SOWK
Sociology - SOCI 
Spanish - SPAN 
Speech - SPCH 
Television and Radio - TVRD
Theatre - THET 
Turkish - TURK
Women's Studies - WMST