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HIST 111 American History to 1877

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to describe the major political, diplomatic, economic, and social developments from the fifteenth century through the Reconstruction period. In particular, you will study the Red, Black and White cultures of pre-revolutionary America; the American Revolution and the development of American republicanism; the Transportation Revolution and the emergence of a market economy; territorial expansion and wars; 1783-1860; antebellum reformers; Civil War, 1861-1865; Reconstruction, 1865-1877. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

HIST 112 American History Since 1877

After successfully completing this course, you will be able to describe the major political, diplomatic, economic, and social developments in American history from the end of the Reconstruction period to the present. In particular, you will study: the rise of industrial capitalism, the mechanization of agriculture; the end of the frontier and the wars with the Native-Americans; immigration; urbanization; the changing role of the family; the history of women; the history of Afro-Americans; the political party system; the impact of the New Deal on current domestic politics; and the impact of World War II and the Cold War on American Foreign Policy.20 Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL101 or ENGL11120. (3 hours weekly/3 credits).
HIST 121 The Ancient World
(Prehistory to the Middle Ages)

The student will be able to describe the history and development of early world civilizations through the 13th century. The student will be able to identify and analyze the major political, economic, and intellectual movements that influenced these civilizations. The student will be able to analyze and discuss, from primary and secondary sources, the impact Middle Eastern, Asian, African, and Classical cultures had on Western Civilization. This course was formerly HIST 101. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

HIST 122 Middle Ages to 1815
(Western Civilization and the Pre-Modern World)

The student will be able to describe the major features of the development of western civilization and its relationship to non-western cultures. The course will include the use of primary and secondary sources to focus on social, economic, political, and cultural factors influencing the relationship of western and non-western societies. Prerequisites: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)
HIST 123 1815 to the Present
(Western Civilization and the Modern World)

The student will be able to describe the history and development of Western Civilization and its impact on the world from 1815 to the present. The student will identify and analyze the political, economic and intellectual movements that influenced the Western European mind. The student will examine the character of the evolving modern nation state system through the wars of unification, overseas expansion, and the competitive national rivalries. The student will evaluate the underlying factors influencing the events that shaped the modern world, including two World Wars and the Cold War. The student will examine how the post-1945 conditions affect the attitudes and makeup of the former colonial world. This course was formerly HIST 102. Prerequisite: Eligible to enroll in ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

Social and Behavioral Sciences Core Courses

HIST 201 Europe in the Twentieth Century

The student will be able to describe the political, economic, intellectual and cultural development in Europe beginning with the events and conditions that led to the breakdown of European stability and World War I. The student will examine the diplomatic maneuverings of the Peace of Paris and its consequences, the roots and impacts of the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia and the evolution and development of totalitarianism in Germany and Italy. The student will also explain the origins, events, and results of World War II, the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Empire, and the quest for a united Europe. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)
HIST 211 Asian Civilization
This study of East Asian history will enable the student to describe the major political, economic, intellectual and cultural developments in the Pacific region from antiquity to the present. The student will concentrate on the events of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries and will develop an understanding of East Asia from the historical perspective of China and Japan rather than from the West. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

HIST 213 History of Modern Russia

The student will be introduced to the history and development of the modern state of Russia from the establishment of the Romanov dynasty through the Revolution of 1917 to Stalin, Perestroika and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)
HIST 226 History of the African American Experience
This course will examine the African American experience in the United States from slavery to the present era. The student will study the chronology of black history, the African heritage, the crucible of slavery, the struggle for equality, Pan Africanism, and the development and evolution of the African American community. Special attention will be given to African American personages and their contributions to American society. The evolution of contemporary race relationships will be evaluated. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

Other History Courses

HIST 200 History of Maryland

As a result of having taken this course, the student will be able to describe and critically evaluate the major developments in the history of Maryland and Howard County from colonial times to the present. The student will also be able to examine the major primary source materials used in the study of local history. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

HIST 205 A History of Race, and Ethnicity in the United States

This course focuses on a neglected dimension in American History and society, namely the study of the diverse racial and ethnic and other non-traditional communities in the United States. The impact of the Anglo-core culture on our political, religious and economic institutions - Democracy, Protestantism, Capitalism - is the major frame of reference. Assimilationist and power conflict sociological models are applied to white, ethnic, Native-American, Afro-American, Hispanic-American and Asian- American groups. Immigration policies and hatred towards diverse groups are studied from historical and contemporary perspectives. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

HIST 215 Celtic Ireland

The student will be able to describe the history and development of Ireland from the Celtic settlements to the Cromwellian occupation. The student will be able to evaluate the impact and response of native Irish society and culture to Celtic, Christian, Norse, Anglo-Saxon and British influences. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

HIST 220/ENGL220 History and Literature
of Victorian and Edwardian Britain

The student will be able to discuss and evaluate the historical and cultural epochs of nineteenth and early twentieth century Britain as expressed through its literature. The student will accomplish these objectives through their studies of the major trends and dominating influences of the romantic movement, the social upheaval of the industrial revolution, the Victorian age of affluence, the era of imperialism, the Edwardian age, and the trauma of the First World War epoch. This cross disciplinary course is a team-taught class. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits) NOTE: Also listed as ENGL220.

HIST 221 American History Since 1945

The student will study the major political, economic, social and cultural trends from the end of World War II to the present. In particular, students will focus on the origins, implementation, and the end of our Cold War foreign policies as well as study changes on the recent domestic scene such as the imperial Presidency, the welfare state, the technotronic economy, the Black Revolution, Women's Liberation and the evolving social, cultural, and moral landscape. Prerequisite: ENGL 101 or ENGL 111. (3 hours weekly/3 credits)

HIST 906 The Art And Culture Of Ancient Egypt

This course surveys the culture and history of Ancient Egypt through its art, sculpture, and architecture. The course covers Ancient Egypt’s history from the earliest times through the end of the empire period. Throughout, you will study the major topics that will allow us to form a picture of Ancient Egypt’s culture.  Some of the topics will include how the Egyptians were able to build their pyramids, their religion, the role of women in Ancient Egypt, their hieroglyphics, and what these people looked like.

HIST 907 American Military History

This course will focus on the history of American military involvements, policies, strategies, and leadership from colonial times through the Cold War. You will study the main periods of such involvements, such as The American Revolution, national expansion, The Civil War, becoming a world power starting around 1898, World Wars I and II, Vietnam, and the post-Cold War world.